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Working on an assignment. Taking classes online and I've emailed my prof with the same question but I'm hoping to get a quicker response from you wonderful people here (as I only have 2 hours per day that I can work on school and Ive hit a roadblock).

Assignment is to finish the code for a binary search tree and blah blah implement some stuff.

I'm hung up on one chunk of code that I just cant understand.

This is a code snippet from the LinkedBinaryTree class that was provided. LinkedBinaryTree relies on a BinaryTreeNode class for the nodes.

public class LinkedBinaryTree<T> implements BinaryTreeADT<T>, Iterable<T>
{
   protected BinaryTreeNode<T> root; 
   protected int modCount;
}

//Constructors

public LinkedBinaryTree() 
{
    root = null;
}  

public LinkedBinaryTree(T element) 
{
    root = new BinaryTreeNode<T>(element);
}

public LinkedBinaryTree(T element, LinkedBinaryTree<T> left, 
        LinkedBinaryTree<T> right) 
{
    root = new BinaryTreeNode<T>(element);
    root.setLeft(left.root);
    root.setRight(right.root);
}

This is primarily what I fail to grasp.

root.setLeft(left.root);

root.setRight(right.root);

What is .root and how does that work.

The variable is being used in two places? is this some kind of recursion/magic that I just haven't encountered yet? (And currently fail to understand) If so, I will get reading let me know and point me in the right direction.

I will post the code for the BinaryTreeNode methods below. I don't understand these parameters that are being passed.

root is a variable of the type BinaryTreeNode but in its use it is passing a LinkedBinaryTree either left or right as the parameters for a method that requires a variable of type BinaryTreeNode

public class BinaryTreeNode<T>{

    protected T element;
    protected BinaryTreeNode<T> left, right;

//Constructors

public BinaryTreeNode(T obj) 
{
    element = obj;
    left = null;
    right = null;
}

public BinaryTreeNode(T obj, LinkedBinaryTree<T> left, LinkedBinaryTree<T> right) 
{
    element = obj;
    if (left == null)
        this.left = null;
    else
        this.left = left.getRootNode();

    if (right == null)
        this.right = null;
    else
        this.right = right.getRootNode();
}

And the methods in question

public void setLeft(BinaryTreeNode<T> node)
{
    left = node;
}

public void setRight(BinaryTreeNode<T> node) 
{
    right = node;
}
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  • If you're asking about left.root and right.root, it's just getting the root of the left node, and the root of the right node. Each node has two child nodes (that's what makes it a binary tree). That's just getting the root of each of the children. Feb 7, 2019 at 23:52
  • hmm sorry, this seems realy to broad, Imo the explanation would fill a chapter in a book(given I understand the question correctly). So I want to ask you with all respect if you can break your question down into smaller chunks?
    – kai
    Feb 7, 2019 at 23:57
  • I just don't understand how .root works, more specifically. How is this able to retrieve the root node from the left or right tree. In the LinkedBinaryTree class there is no method for .root Feb 7, 2019 at 23:58
  • It's exactly what @Carcigenicate said. left is a LinkedBinaryTree and LinkedBinaryTree has a root instance variable. It's right there in your listing just before modCount. So left.root accesses (or in this case reads) the value of that variable.
    – markspace
    Feb 8, 2019 at 0:00
  • Well I don't know if the straight answer helps you, but well: its a member in a object.
    – kai
    Feb 8, 2019 at 0:00

1 Answer 1

0

This is a binary tree, as mentioned.

Every not-null node has a node to the left and right. Sometimes the value of nodes are null.

As explained in the comments of the question, you are calling the root variable from the type BinaryTreeNode. It would only make sense because the code was written.

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