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I'm hunting for the cause of a bug and think I may have found it if my understanding of using #define is correct.

As i understand it, once you define something, its set that way, even if the define is filled with the value of a variable, it sticks with the value at the time of compile and would not change if the variable changed later? So this code:

int values[] = {5,6,7,8};
int x = 0;
#define DEF_VALUE values[x]

DEF_VALUE would be 5, as 5 is the value of position 0 in the values array.

But if I was to do this:

int values[] = {5,6,7,8};
int x = 0;
#define DEF_VALUE values[x]
x = 2;

DEF_VALUE would still be 5 as that was the output of values[x] at the time that #define was called, so changing the value of x later to 2 would not cause a change in DEF_VALUE to 7 (the value of position 2 in the values array).

Is my logic here correct?

If so I think I've found my bug as the original programmer of this code was relying on updating x to update the value of DEF_VALUE later in the code for a location address for selections.

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The way #define works in C is that it creates an expansion, that is any place where DEF_VALUE occurs, the compiler treats it as if values[x] was written. The C pre-processor effectively re-writes the code by applying these expansions and the resulting re-written code is what's supplied to the compiler.

In this case changing x has the effect of changing what DEF_VALUE ultimately evaluates to, but not what it expands to.

In your second case it expands to 7 if and only if x is 2. If this #define is used in another scope then the results are unknown or a syntax error depending on what variables are present.

Some test code:

void demo() {
  int values[] = {5,6,7,8};
  int x = 0;
  #define DEF_VALUE values[x]
  x = 2;

  printf("%d\n", DEF_VALUE);
}

Here it shows 7 as expected.

Once the pre-processor has finished with this code it ends up in this form:

void demo() {
  int values[] = {5,6,7,8};
  int x = 0;
  x = 2;

  printf("%d\n", values[x]);
}

If later in your code you have this:

void other() {
  printf("%d\n", DEF_VALUE);
}

You get a syntax error. That's because the code the compiler is told to work with is actually:

void other() {
  printf("%d\n", values[x]);
}

As neither values nor x are present in that scope it can't compile.

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  • 1
    Ah great, thank you for the explanation. Shame that that means I haven't found the source of the bug, but glad to have had my understanding of #define corrected.
    – solexious
    Feb 8, 2019 at 1:13
  • 1
    @solexious: An attempt at finding a bug -- any bug, really -- usually requires reproducibility. Complete source example, observed output, expected output. Actually, any question on StackOverflow asking "why doesn't this work as expected?" that does not come with a minimal reproducible example is usually attacting close-votes pretty fast. ;-)
    – DevSolar
    Feb 12, 2019 at 7:55

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