5

I'm attempting to create a simple linear model with Python using no libraries (other than numpy). Here's what I have

import numpy as np

import pandas

np.random.seed(1)

alpha = 0.1

def h(x, w):
  return np.dot(w.T, x)

def cost(X, W, Y):
  totalCost = 0
  for i in range(47):
    diff = h(X[i], W) - Y[i]
    squared = diff * diff
    totalCost += squared

  return totalCost / 2

housing_data = np.loadtxt('Housing.csv', delimiter=',')

x1 = housing_data[:,0]
x2 = housing_data[:,1]
y = housing_data[:,2]

avgX1 = np.mean(x1)
stdX1 = np.std(x1)
normX1 = (x1 - avgX1) / stdX1
print('avgX1', avgX1)
print('stdX1', stdX1)

avgX2 = np.mean(x2)
stdX2 = np.std(x2)
normX2 = (x2 - avgX2) / stdX2

print('avgX2', avgX2)
print('stdX2', stdX2)

normalizedX = np.ones((47, 3))

normalizedX[:,1] = normX1
normalizedX[:,2] = normX2

np.savetxt('normalizedX.csv', normalizedX)

weights = np.ones((3,))

for boom in range(100):
  currentCost = cost(normalizedX, weights, y)
  if boom % 1 == 0:
    print(boom, 'iteration', weights[0], weights[1], weights[2])
    print('Cost', currentCost)

  for i in range(47):
    errorDiff = h(normalizedX[i], weights) - y[i]
    weights[0] = weights[0] - alpha * (errorDiff) * normalizedX[i][0]
    weights[1] = weights[1] - alpha * (errorDiff) * normalizedX[i][1]
    weights[2] = weights[2] - alpha * (errorDiff) * normalizedX[i][2]

print(weights)

predictedX = [1, (2100 - avgX1) / stdX1, (3 - avgX2) / stdX2]
firstPrediction = np.array(predictedX)
print('firstPrediction', firstPrediction)
firstPrediction = h(firstPrediction, weights)
print(firstPrediction)

First, it converges VERY quickly. After only 14 iterations. Second, it gives me a different result than a linear regression with sklearn. For reference, my sklearn code is:

import numpy
import matplotlib.pyplot as plot
import pandas
import sklearn
from sklearn.model_selection import train_test_split
from sklearn.linear_model import LinearRegression

dataset = pandas.read_csv('Housing.csv', header=None)

x = dataset.iloc[:, :-1].values
y = dataset.iloc[:, 2].values

linearRegressor = LinearRegression()

xnorm = sklearn.preprocessing.scale(x)
scaleCoef = sklearn.preprocessing.StandardScaler().fit(x)
mean = scaleCoef.mean_
std = numpy.sqrt(scaleCoef.var_)
print('stf')
print(std)

stuff = linearRegressor.fit(xnorm, y)

predictedX = [[(2100 - mean[0]) / std[0], (3 - mean[1]) / std[1]]]
yPrediction = linearRegressor.predict(predictedX)
print('predictedX', predictedX)
print('predict', yPrediction)


print(stuff.coef_, stuff.intercept_)

My custom model predicts 337,000 for the value of y and sklearn predicts 355,000. My data is 47 rows that look like

2104,3,3.999e+05
1600,3,3.299e+05
2400,3,3.69e+05
1416,2,2.32e+05
3000,4,5.399e+05
1985,4,2.999e+05
1534,3,3.149e+05

Complete data available at https://github.com/shamoons/linear-logistic-regression/blob/master/Housing.csv

I assume either (a) my regression with gradient descent is somehow wrong or (b) I'm not using sklearn properly.

Any other reasons why the 2 wouldn't predict the same output for a given input?

  • Can you provide a copy of your data please? – rayryeng - Reinstate Monica Feb 8 at 2:20
  • I added a link to the complete data set – Shamoon Feb 8 at 14:05
  • 1
    I think the linear regressor is based on scipy.linalg.lstsq, which uses lapack gelsd driver (svd to solve the least square problem). I think because you are using gradient descent and not the same algorithm, they may be leading to different weights and hence different predictions. – plasmon360 Feb 10 at 4:44
  • @plasmon360 can I make the scikit use a gradient descent? – Shamoon Feb 10 at 6:07
  • @Shamoon I think you can use stochastic gradient regressor (scikit-learn.org/stable/modules/generated/…) It is similar to gradient descent, but differs in the way the gradient are calculated. – plasmon360 Feb 10 at 6:31
3
+50

I think you are missing the 1/m term (where m is the size of y) in the gradient descent. After including the 1/m term, I seem to get a predicted value similar to your sklearn code.

see below

....
weights = np.ones((3,))

m = y.size
for boom in range(100):
  currentCost = cost(normalizedX, weights, y)
  if boom % 1 == 0:
    print(boom, 'iteration', weights[0], weights[1], weights[2])
    print('Cost', currentCost)

  for i in range(47):
    errorDiff = h(normalizedX[i], weights) - y[i]
    weights[0] = weights[0] - alpha *(1/m)* (errorDiff) * normalizedX[i][0]
    weights[1] = weights[1] - alpha *(1/m)*  (errorDiff) * normalizedX[i][1]
    weights[2] = weights[2] - alpha *(1/m)* (errorDiff) * normalizedX[i][2]

...

this gives the firstprediction to be 355242.

This agrees well with the linear regression model even though it does not do gradient descent.

I also tried sgdregressor (uses stochastic gradient descent) in sklearn and it too seem to get a value close to linear regressor model and your model. see the code below

import numpy
import matplotlib.pyplot as plot
import pandas
import sklearn
from sklearn.model_selection import train_test_split
from sklearn.linear_model import LinearRegression, SGDRegressor

dataset = pandas.read_csv('Housing.csv', header=None)

x = dataset.iloc[:, :-1].values
y = dataset.iloc[:, 2].values

sgdRegressor = SGDRegressor(penalty='none', learning_rate='constant', eta0=0.1, max_iter=1000, tol = 1E-6)

xnorm = sklearn.preprocessing.scale(x)
scaleCoef = sklearn.preprocessing.StandardScaler().fit(x)
mean = scaleCoef.mean_
std = numpy.sqrt(scaleCoef.var_)
print('stf')
print(std)

yPrediction = []
predictedX = [[(2100 - mean[0]) / std[0], (3 - mean[1]) / std[1]]]
print('predictedX', predictedX)
for trials in range(10):
    stuff = sgdRegressor.fit(xnorm, y)
    yPrediction.extend(sgdRegressor.predict(predictedX))
print('predict', np.mean(yPrediction))

results in

predict 355533.10119985335

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.