7

I recently came across this raytracer in LINQ. Just wondering if anyone can top that?

var pixelsQuery =
from y in Enumerable.Range(0, screenHeight)
let recenterY = -(y - (screenHeight / 2.0)) / (2.0 * screenHeight)
select from x in Enumerable.Range(0, screenWidth)
       let recenterX = (x - (screenWidth / 2.0)) / (2.0 * screenWidth)
       let point = Vector.Norm(Vector.Plus(scene.Camera.Forward, 
                                           Vector.Plus(Vector.Times(recenterX, scene.Camera.Right),
                                                       Vector.Times(recenterY, scene.Camera.Up))))
       let ray = new Ray { Start = scene.Camera.Pos, Dir = point }
       let computeTraceRay = (Func<Func<TraceRayArgs, Color>, Func<TraceRayArgs, Color>>)
        (f => traceRayArgs =>
         (from isect in
              from thing in traceRayArgs.Scene.Things
              select thing.Intersect(traceRayArgs.Ray)
          where isect != null
          orderby isect.Dist
          let d = isect.Ray.Dir
          let pos = Vector.Plus(Vector.Times(isect.Dist, isect.Ray.Dir), isect.Ray.Start)
          let normal = isect.Thing.Normal(pos)
          let reflectDir = Vector.Minus(d, Vector.Times(2 * Vector.Dot(normal, d), normal))
          let naturalColors = 
              from light in traceRayArgs.Scene.Lights
              let ldis = Vector.Minus(light.Pos, pos)
              let livec = Vector.Norm(ldis)
              let testRay = new Ray { Start = pos, Dir = livec }
              let testIsects = from inter in
                                   from thing in traceRayArgs.Scene.Things
                                   select thing.Intersect(testRay)
                               where inter != null
                               orderby inter.Dist
                               select inter
              let testIsect = testIsects.FirstOrDefault()
              let neatIsect = testIsect == null ? 0 : testIsect.Dist
              let isInShadow = !((neatIsect > Vector.Mag(ldis)) || (neatIsect == 0))
              where !isInShadow
              let illum = Vector.Dot(livec, normal)
              let lcolor = illum > 0 ? Color.Times(illum, light.Color) : Color.Make(0, 0, 0)
              let specular = Vector.Dot(livec, Vector.Norm(reflectDir))
              let scolor = specular > 0 
                           ? Color.Times(Math.Pow(specular, isect.Thing.Surface.Roughness), light.Color) 
                           : Color.Make(0, 0, 0)
              select Color.Plus(Color.Times(isect.Thing.Surface.Diffuse(pos), lcolor),
                                Color.Times(isect.Thing.Surface.Specular(pos), scolor))
          let reflectPos = Vector.Plus(pos, Vector.Times(.001, reflectDir))
          let reflectColor = 
              traceRayArgs.Depth >= MaxDepth
              ? Color.Make(.5, .5, .5)
              : Color.Times(isect.Thing.Surface.Reflect(reflectPos), 
                            f(new TraceRayArgs(new Ray { Start = reflectPos, Dir = reflectDir }, 
                                               traceRayArgs.Scene, 
                                               traceRayArgs.Depth + 1)))
          select naturalColors.Aggregate(reflectColor, (color, natColor) => Color.Plus(color, natColor)))
                              .DefaultIfEmpty(Color.Background).First())
       let traceRay = Y(computeTraceRay)
       select new { X = x, Y = y, Color = traceRay(new TraceRayArgs(ray, scene, 0)) };

foreach (var row in pixelsQuery)
    foreach (var pixel in row)
        setPixel(pixel.X, pixel.Y, pixel.Color.ToDrawingColor());
6

I doubt that there's anything to top the raytracer. I'm quite fond of my Mandelbrot expression though:

from row in Enumerable.Range(0, ImageHeight)
from col in Enumerable.Range(0, ImageWidth)
// Work out the initial complex value from the row and column
let c = new Complex((col * SampleWidth) / ImageWidth + OffsetX,
                    (row * SampleHeight) / ImageHeight + OffsetY)
// Work out the number of iterations
select Generate(c, x => x * x + c).TakeWhile(x => x.SquareLength < 4)
                                  .Take(MaxIterations)
                                  .Count() into count
// Map that to an appropriate byte value
select (byte)(count == MaxIterations ? 0 : (count % 255) + 1); 
5

Mads Torgersen demonstrates how to write a self-contained recursive lambda expression in LINQ to calculate (e.g.) a factorial:

i => new Func<Func<int,int>,Func<int,int>>(fac => x => x == 0 ? 1 : x * fac(x
- 1))(new SelfApplicable<Func<Func<Func<int,int>,Func<int,int>>,Func<int,int>
>>(y => f => x => f(y(y)(f))(x))(y => f => x => f(y(y)(f))(x))(fac => x => x
== 0 ? 1 : x * fac(x - 1)))(i)

Mads notes:

I can’t even figure out how to line break it so that it approaches readable, so I haven’t.

  • Fascinating (the blog entry, that is - the lambda itself is eye-agonising...) – Marc Gravell Feb 13 '09 at 14:20
2

Call me crazy, but I'm a big fan of readability - so I tend to just have a sequence of individually-innocent-looking expressions that I then combine. Of course, it depends how you define LINQ: if you mean query-syntax in C#, then I don't tend to go overboard... but if you mean meta-programming (i.e. C# code that creates a LINQ expression), I've got a few good examples:

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.