5

I have this data frame of coordinates of Belgian locations :

data
# # A tibble: 11 x 4
#         LON      LAT        x        y
#       <dbl>    <dbl>    <dbl>    <dbl>
#  1 3.618942 50.68165 96227.01 152551.2
#  2 3.473466 50.55899 86074.26 138702.0
#  3 3.442395 50.69979 84369.88 154860.5
#  4 3.293505 50.68766 73127.74 153413.9
#  5 3.352688 50.68009 77876.00 153115.7
#  6 3.567919 50.52372 93229.16 134975.7
#  7 3.333666 50.54388 76183.82 137373.9
#  8 3.394737 50.61322 80806.11 145230.0
#  9 3.410566 50.53073 82041.22 135743.9
# 10 3.613925 50.59610 96907.40 143057.9
# 11 3.502580 50.74147 88860.56 159399.0

I know x and y are in meters, but I don't know what convention is used, I got them by digging in a DB of public Belgian data but couldn't figure this out from the available info.

The longitudes and latitudes present in the table are not exact fits (x and y are coordinates of centers of regions and LAT and LON are averages of the coordinates of a sample of inhabitants of these regions) but they give a good idea of what the translation between both should be.

How can I figure out which coordinate system x and y are coded in ?

I've looked at the package sp and I've built a couple conversion functions to and from a common system (UTM), built around @josh-Obrien's answer to this question but these seem to be keys for another door.

Please see them below in case they can be adapted/used for the solution (maybe by looping somehow on the arguments of sp::CRS) ?.

I know library rgdal does coordinates conversions as well with similar syntax as sp.

data

data <- structure(list(
  LON = c(3.6189419546606, 3.47346614446389, 3.44239459327957, 
          3.29350462630471, 3.35268808777572, 3.56791893543689, 3.33366611318681, 
          3.39473714826007, 3.41056562146275, 3.61392544406354, 3.50258), 
  LAT = c(50.6816466868977, 50.5589876530483, 50.6997902260753, 
          50.6876572958438, 50.6800941411327, 50.523718459466, 50.5438833669109, 
          50.6132227223641, 50.5307279235646, 50.5960956577015, 50.7414748843137), 
  x = c(96227.0052771935, 86074.2589595734, 84369.8773101478, 
        73127.7357132523, 77875.9986049107, 93229.1592839806, 76183.8151614011, 
        80806.111537044, 82041.2236842105, 96907.4010078463, 88860.5615808823), 
  y = c(152551.212026743, 138702.046875, 154860.466229839, 153413.886429398, 
        153115.726084184, 134975.700053095, 137373.913804945, 145229.97987092, 
        135743.853978207, 143057.883184524, 159399.019607843)), 
  class = c("tbl_df", "tbl", "data.frame"), row.names = c(NA, -11L),
  .Names = c("LON", "LAT", "x", "y"))

conversion functions

#' add UTM coordinates (x and y in km) from WGS84 coordinates (long and lat)
#'
#' @param data a data frame 
#' @param out_names names of x and y columns in output data frame
#' @param in_names names of longlat columns in input, by default searches for
#'   an unambiguous set of columns with names starting with "lat" and "lon"
#'    (case insensitive)
#' @param zone UTM zone, for Belgium it's 31 (the default), see 
#'   http://www.dmap.co.uk/utmworld.htm
#'
#' @return a data frame with 2 more columns
#' @export
#'
#' @examples
#' xy <- data.frame(ID = 1:2, longitude = c(118, 119), latitude = c(10, 50))
#  add_longlat(add_utm(xy))
add_utm <- function(data, out_names = c("x","y"), in_names = NULL, zone = 31){
  nms <- names(data)
  if(length(temp <- intersect(out_names,nms)))
    stop(paste("data already contains",paste(temp,collapse =" and ")))
  if(is.null(in_names)){
    lon_col <- grep("^lon",nms, ignore.case = TRUE,value = TRUE)
    lat_col <- grep("^lat",nms, ignore.case = TRUE,value = TRUE)
    if((n <- length(lon_col)) != 1)
      stop(sprintf(
        "%s columns have names starting with 'lon' (case insensitive)", n))
    if((n <- length(lat_col)) != 1)
      stop(sprintf(
        "%s columns have names starting with 'lon' (case insensitive)", n))
    in_names <- c(lon_col, lat_col)
  }
  new_data <- data[in_names]
  sp::coordinates(new_data) <- names(new_data)
  sp::proj4string(new_data) <- sp::CRS("+proj=longlat +datum=WGS84")  ## for example
  res <- sp::spTransform(new_data, sp::CRS(sprintf("+proj=utm +zone=%s ellps=WGS84",zone)))
  res <- setNames(as.data.frame(res), out_names)
  cbind(data,res)
}

#' add WGS84 coordinates (long and lat) from UTM coordinates (x and y in km)
#'
#' @param data a data frame 
#' @param out_names names of longitude and latitude columns in output data frame
#' @param in_names names of longlat columns in input, by default searches for
#'   an unambiguous set of columns with names starting with "x" and "y"
#'    (case insensitive)
#' @param zone UTM zone, for Belgium it's 31 (the default), see 
#'   http://www.dmap.co.uk/utmworld.htm
#'
#' @return a data frame with 2 more columns
#' @export
#'
#' @examples
#' xy <- data.frame(ID = 1:2, longitude = c(118, 119), latitude = c(10, 50))
#  add_longlat(add_utm(xy))
add_longlat <- function(data, out_names = c("LON","LAT"), in_names = NULL, zone = 31){
  nms <- names(data)
  if(length(temp <- intersect(out_names,nms)))
    stop(paste("data already contains",paste(temp,collapse =" and ")))
  if(is.null(in_names)){
    lon_col <- grep("^x",nms, ignore.case = TRUE,value = TRUE)
    lat_col <- grep("^y",nms, ignore.case = TRUE,value = TRUE)
    if((n <- length(lon_col)) != 1)
      stop(sprintf(
        "%s columns have names starting with 'x' (case insensitive)", n))
    if((n <- length(lat_col)) != 1)
      stop(sprintf(
        "%s columns have names starting with 'y' (case insensitive)", n))
    in_names <- c(lon_col, lat_col)
  }
  new_data <- data[in_names]
  sp::coordinates(new_data) <- names(new_data)
  sp::proj4string(new_data) <- sp::CRS(sprintf("+proj=utm +zone=%s ellps=WGS84",zone))  ## for example
  res <- sp::spTransform(new_data, sp::CRS("+proj=longlat +datum=WGS84"))
  res <- setNames(as.data.frame(res), out_names)
  cbind(data,res)
}
  • Im not sure if i understand your question, but am i right that you are looking for the origin of your x/y coordinate-system? – TinglTanglBob Feb 8 at 16:06
  • not quite, my ultimate goal is to find a conversion system, but the aim of this question, as a first step, is to find how this system is named (so I can then lookup how to convert it). knowing the origin will not bring me closer to my goal. – Moody_Mudskipper Feb 8 at 16:11
3

I think it may be the Belgian Lambert 1972 reference system or something close to it, with EPSG code 31370. I did this basically by searching through a list of the first few EPSG codes from a search for Belgian ones, assuming the x_y coordinates were in that CRS and then transforming to WGS84 to compare against the latitude and longitude. Here is my code; you can see that 31370 has a root mean square error of around 490m which is less than others I searched through. (You can obviously expand the search range, I tried a few but this was the closest I found). Note the use of possibly to deal with the fact that the code will error when no transformation for the EPSG code is found, since I could not find an easy list of all available codes. I also do not know what the expected precision is here because you said that the lat-lon points are not exactly the same as the unknown crs ones. Depending on the size of the regions and the plausible sampling patterns, 470m could be a clincher or an indicator that we're still far off...

library(tidyverse)
library(sf)
#> Linking to GEOS 3.6.1, GDAL 2.1.3, PROJ 4.9.3
data <- structure(list(LON = c(3.6189419546606, 3.47346614446389, 3.44239459327957, 3.29350462630471, 3.35268808777572, 3.56791893543689, 3.33366611318681, 3.39473714826007, 3.41056562146275, 3.61392544406354, 3.50258), LAT = c(50.6816466868977, 50.5589876530483, 50.6997902260753, 50.6876572958438, 50.6800941411327, 50.523718459466, 50.5438833669109, 50.6132227223641, 50.5307279235646, 50.5960956577015, 50.7414748843137), x = c(96227.0052771935, 86074.2589595734, 84369.8773101478, 73127.7357132523, 77875.9986049107, 93229.1592839806, 76183.8151614011, 80806.111537044, 82041.2236842105, 96907.4010078463, 88860.5615808823), y = c(152551.212026743, 138702.046875, 154860.466229839, 153413.886429398, 153115.726084184, 134975.700053095, 137373.913804945, 145229.97987092, 135743.853978207, 143057.883184524, 159399.019607843)), class = c("tbl_df", "tbl", "data.frame"), row.names = c(NA, -11L), .Names = c("LON", "LAT", "x", "y"))
epsg_belgium <- c(3447, 3812, 31370, 31300, 21500, 4809, 4313, 4215, 25832, 8370, 6190, 5710, 25831)
guess_crs <- function(tbl, lon_lat, x_y, epsg_codes) {
  if(! requireNamespace("lwgeom"))
    stop("Package 'lwgeom' must be installed to use `guess_crs`")
  wgs84 <- tbl %>%
    st_as_sf(coords = lon_lat, crs = 4326)
  compare_crs <- function(epsg) {
    tbl %>%
      st_as_sf(coords = x_y, crs = epsg) %>%
      st_transform(4326) %>%
      st_distance(wgs84, by_element = TRUE) %>%
      as.numeric %>%
      `^`(2) %>%
      mean %>%
      sqrt
  }
  poss_commpare <- possibly(compare_crs, otherwise = Inf)
  tibble(
    crs = epsg_codes,
    rms_dist = map_dbl(epsg_codes, poss_commpare)
  ) %>%
    arrange(rms_dist)
}
guess_crs(data, c("LON", "LAT"), c("x", "y"), epsg_belgium)

#> # A tibble: 13 x 2
#>      crs rms_dist
#>    <dbl>    <dbl>
#>  1 31370     492.
#>  2  6190     492.
#>  3 21500     533.
#>  4 31300    1101.
#>  5  3447    1695.
#>  6  3812  706664.
#>  7 25832 5466924.
#>  8 25831 5478500.
#>  9  4809 9862261.
#> 10  4215 9882639.
#> 11  8370     Inf 
#> 12  5710     Inf 
#> 13  4313      NA

Created on 2019-02-08 by the reprex package (v0.2.1)

  • Excellent work! I will confirm on monday that it solves my issue and mark as answered then. Thanks a bunch! – Moody_Mudskipper Feb 8 at 20:47
  • I cannot reproduce it, all my distances are Inf, I didn't have time to investigate it much but I'll most probably figure out myself, and will check answered in time, with the info on what went wrong – Moody_Mudskipper Feb 12 at 8:40
  • I put otherwise = Inf into possibly so it would sort to the bottom, maybe that is the proximate cause? so likely something is erroring earlier and making everything Inf – Calum You Feb 12 at 22:01
  • The problem came from the fact st_distance needs lwgeom to be installed, the fact you used possibly hided this explicit error. Installing it (no need to attach it) solved the issue and I could reproduce your answer. Thanks for the good work! – Moody_Mudskipper Feb 23 at 15:22
  • I permitted myself to edit a requireNamespace call in to make it more robust – Moody_Mudskipper Feb 23 at 15:26

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