48

I want to define the type of an object but let typescript infer the keys and don't have as much overhead to make and maintain a UnionType of all keys.

Typing an object will allow all strings as keys:

const elementsTyped: { 
    [key: string]: { nodes: number, symmetric?: boolean }
} = {
    square: { nodes: 4, symmetric: true },
    triangle: { nodes: 3 }
}

function isSymmetric(elementType: keyof typeof elementsTyped): boolean {
    return elementsTyped[elementType].symmetric;
}
isSymmetric('asdf'); // works but shouldn't

Inferring the whole object will show an error and allows all kind of values:

const elementsInferred = {
    square: { nodes: 4, symmetric: true },
    triangle: { nodes: 3 },
    line: { nodes: 2, notSymmetric: false /* don't want that to be possible */ }
}

function isSymmetric(elementType: keyof typeof elementsInferred): boolean {
    return elementsInferred[elementType].symmetric; 
    // Property 'symmetric' does not exist on type '{ nodes: number; }'.
}

The closest I got was this, but it don't want to maintain the set of keys like that:

type ElementTypes = 'square' | 'triangle'; // don't want to maintain that :(
const elementsTyped: { 
    [key in ElementTypes]: { nodes: number, symmetric?: boolean }
} = {
    square: { nodes: 4, symmetric: true },
    triangle: { nodes: 3 },
    lines: { nodes: 2, notSymmetric: false } // 'lines' does not exist in type ...
    // if I add lines to the ElementTypes as expected => 'notSymmetric' does not exist in type { nodes: number, symmetric?: boolean }
}

function isSymmetric(elementType: keyof typeof elementsTyped): boolean {
    return elementsTyped[elementType].symmetric;
}
isSymmetric('asdf'); // Error: Argument of type '"asdf"' is not assignable to parameter of type '"square" | "triangle"'.

Is there a better way to define the object without maintaining the set of keys?

1

1 Answer 1

40

So you want something that infers keys but restricts the value types and uses excess property checking to disallow extra properties. I think the easiest way to get that behavior is to introduce a helper function:

// Let's give a name to this type
interface ElementType {
  nodes: number,
  symmetric?: boolean
}

// helper function which infers keys and restricts values to ElementType
const asElementTypes = <T>(et: { [K in keyof T]: ElementType }) => et;

This helper function infers the type T from the mapped type of et. Now you can use it like this:

const elementsTyped = asElementTypes({
  square: { nodes: 4, symmetric: true },
  triangle: { nodes: 3 },
  line: { nodes: 2, notSymmetric: false /* error where you want it */} 
});

The type of the resulting elementsTyped will (once you fix the error) have inferred keys square, triangle, and line, with values ElementType.

Hope that works for you. Good luck!

8
  • 2
    ok I feared that it might need an helper. would be amazing if typescript could do that without it. also I can use that only for this usecase. is there a way to make the ElementType generic too? I wasn't able to without breaking the key inference or excess property checking (thanks for the keyword ;) )
    – Jack
    Feb 11, 2019 at 15:12
  • 1
    well would be nice if I could use that there was a generic asTypedObject<MyValueType>(...) function. here: asElementTypes= asTypedObject<ElementType>.
    – Jack
    Feb 13, 2019 at 17:30
  • 7
    In the absence of partial type parameter inference you can use currying to achieve this: const asTypedObject = <E>() => <T>(et: { [K in keyof T]: E }) => et; const asElementType = asTypedObject<ElementType>();
    – jcalz
    Feb 13, 2019 at 20:14
  • 1
    It might be possible to get closer to what you’re looking for but the comment section of an already-answered question probably isn’t a great forum for it. If you’re really interested in getting an answer to this it might be worth making a new question so you get more eyes on it... after you search, of course, since “how to require a type parameter” might be answered elsewhere.
    – jcalz
    Feb 14, 2019 at 11:31
  • 1
    @Jack: function asElementTypes<T>() { return function <Obj>(obj: { [K in keyof Obj]: T }) { return obj; }; }
    – tokland
    Feb 1, 2021 at 9:26

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