1

I need to output two cleaned and recalculated dataframes to Excel file as separate sheets. This code works, but opening resulting file in Excel produces "file corrupted" - it gets repaired and opens fine afterwards, but this is annoying.

The code is on Azure Jupiter Notebook, Python 3.6, I download Excel file and open in Excel 365, Win 10.

# Create a Pandas Excel writer using XlsxWriter as the engine.
writer = pd.ExcelWriter('PR_weatherGDDid.xlsx', engine='xlsxwriter') 

# Write each dataframe to a different worksheet.
df.to_excel(writer, sheet_name='Daily', index=False)     
doystats.to_excel(writer, sheet_name='stats')    

# Close the Pandas Excel writer and output the Excel file.
writer.save()

So: Excel file gets created but has a problem to be opened in Excel.

1

As Larisa Golovko noted, this appears to be an issue only with XlsxWriter on Azure Notebooks. It doesn't happen with XlsxWriter, Pandas or Jupyter in offline environments.

I dug into it a bit more here and it looks like it there is a zipfile compression error on the .rels files in the xlsx archive. Currently I don't know what is causing that but it appears to be related to the standard Python zipfile library on that environment. I'll try to put together a simpler test case without XlsxWriter.

A workaround is to use the XlsxWriter in_memory constructor option:

workbook = xlsxwriter.Workbook('hello_world.xlsx', {'in_memory': True})

# Or:

writer = pd.ExcelWriter('pandas_example.xlsx',
                        engine='xlsxwriter',
                        options={'in_memory': True})
4

Here is the correct way.

>>> with pd.ExcelWriter('PR_weatherGDDid.xlsx') as writer: 
...     df.to_excel(writer, sheet_name='Daily')
...     doystats.to_excel(writer, sheet_name='stats')
  • Thank you, this looks shorter and more concise! – landviser Feb 8 at 22:18
2

This is my code and I can open the Excell file allright:

# Create a Pandas Excel writer using XlsxWriter as the engine.
writer = pd.ExcelWriter('PR_weatherGDDid.xlsx') 

data = [['AMN987','Ok'],['AMN987','Ok'],['AMN987','Error'], ['BBB987','Ok'],['BBB987','Ok'],['CCC','Error']]
df = pd.DataFrame(data, columns=['Serial', 'Status'])

days_to = [['02/08/19',4],['02/08/19',8],['02/08/19',3], ['02/08/19',6],['02/08/19',0],['02/08/19',9]]
doystats = pd.DataFrame(days_to, columns=['Date', 'Day'])

# Write each dataframe to a different worksheet.
df.to_excel(writer, sheet_name='Daily', index=False)     
doystats.to_excel(writer, sheet_name='stats')    

# Close the Pandas Excel writer and output the Excel file.
writer.save()
writer.close()

The output looks like this:

enter image description here enter image description here

  • 1
    Thank you. It is probably not the code but the fact that I write it on Azure notebook and open downloaded Excel file on laptop, maybe? Your sample code produced the file which is opened after "repair" just the same way as mine did... I used two different laptops, but both Win10 and Excel365. Will try to run code directly on laptop... – landviser Feb 10 at 1:27
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The problem with Excel only opening the created file after "repairs" seems to stem from the fact that file was created in Azure Jupiter notebook online. All 3 code variants (mine and suggested by @atlas and @sharif) produced file needing "repairs" in the online environment, but made normal Excel file when I run it through local-installed Jupiter Notebooks (Anaconda).

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  • 1
    I would be interested in debugging this if it is possible to set up a shared Jupyter instance on Azure that I could look at. It would probably be best to raise this as an XlsxWriter issue, rather than dealing with it in the comments here. – jmcnamara Feb 11 at 11:27
  • 1
    I was able to reproduce this myself. I've opened an XlsxWriter issue for it here: Issue 599. The issue appears to be caused by a zip compression error for .rels files in the xlsx archive. It isn't an XlsxWriter issue, it is in the standard Python zipfile library or else something specific to the Azure installation or environment. – jmcnamara Feb 11 at 12:45
  • @jmcnamara - This is the link to my whole code on Azure weather - the Excel part is toward the end. I am just learning Python and has been finding a lot of answers on Stack Overflow, which prompted me to create an account. Also new to GitHUB - not sure how to work with Jupiter Notebooks there and contribute to your projects. – landviser Feb 12 at 14:30
  • No need to submit anything. I was able to isolate the issue myself. Thanks. – jmcnamara Feb 12 at 14:31

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