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I am scripting a ksh file where I am looking to return the file with the most number of lines in a directory. The script can only take one argument and must be a valid directory. I have the 2 error cases figured out but am having trouble with the files with max lines portion so far I have below:

#!/bin/ksh
#Script name: maxlines.sh
ERROR1="error: can only use 0 or 1 arguments.\nusage: maxlines.sh [directory]"
ERROR2="error: argument must be a directory.\nusage: maxlines.sh [directory]\n"
$1
if [[ $# -gt 1 ]]
        then
                printf "$ERROR1"
                exit 1
fi
if [ ! -d "$1" ]
        then
        prinf "$ERROR2"
fi
for "$1"
do
    [wc -l | sort -rn | head -2 | tail -1]

From what I have been finding the max lines will come from using wc, but am unsure of the formatting as I am still new to shell scripting. Any advice will help!

  • What do you mean by am unsure of the formatting ? Does it do what you want? I think it should be correct. If you ONLY want the name and not the number of lines you can tack on ` | awk '{$1=""};1'` ... – tink Feb 9 at 5:34
1
> for "$1"
> do
>    [wc -l | sort -rn | head -2 | tail -1]

The for loop has a minor syntax error, and the square brackets are completely misplaced. You don't need a loop anyway, because wc accepts a list of file name arguments.

wc -l "$1"/* | sort -rn | head -n 1

The top line, not the second line, will contain the file with the largest number of lines. Perhaps you'd like to add an option to trim off the number and return just the file name.

If you wanted to loop over the files in $1, that would look like

for variable in list of items
do
    : things with "$variable"
done

where list of items could be the wildcard expression "$1"/* (as above}, and the do ... done take the place where you imagine you'd want square brackets.

(Square brackets are used in comparisons; [ 1 -gt 2 ] runs the [ command to compare two numbers. It can compare a lot of different things -- strings, files, etc. ksh also has a more developed variant [[ which has some features over the traditional [.)

  • wc -l "$1"/* | sort -rn | head -2 | tail -1 is giving me what I am looking for, thanks for the tips about the [ ] that is good know going forward – hanktank45 Feb 9 at 16:18
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my quoting is a little rusty, but try this bourne shell script:

#!/bin/sh
#Script name: maxlines.sh
ERROR1="error: can only use 0 or 1 arguments.\nusage: maxlines.sh [directory]"
ERROR2="error: argument must be a directory.\nusage: maxlines.sh [directory]\n"
echo argument 1: "$1"
if [ $# -gt 1 ]
        then
        echo "$ERROR1"
    exit 1
fi
if [ ! -d "$1" ]
        then
        echo "$ERROR2"
    exit 1
fi
rm temp.txt
#echo "$1"/*
for i in "$1"/*
    do
    if [ -f "$i" ] 
        then
            #echo 2: $i
            wc -l "$i" >> temp.txt
        #else echo $1 is not a file!
    fi
    done
cat temp.txt | sort -rn | head -1
  • theny is a typo. You don't need a temporary file; just pipe done | wc -l – tripleee Feb 9 at 8:00

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