1

Is the code in the example implementation of the Sieve of Eratosthenes?
What is the complexity of this implementation?

UPD: I build a chart of count operation with an array item. And I think that complexity is O(n). Am I right? enter image description here

console.time('exec');
var arr = fn(Math.pow(10, 2));
console.timeEnd('exec');

function fn(n) {
    var arr = Array.apply(null, {length: n + 1}).map(function() {return true;});
    arr[0] = arr[1] = false;
    var base = 2;
    while (Math.pow(base, 2) < n) {
        var counter = 2;
        while (counter * base < n) {
            arr[counter * base] = false;
            counter++;
        }
        base++;
    }
    return arr;
}

// show result
arr.forEach(function(item, index) {
  if (item) {
     console.log(index);
  }
});

0

3 Answers 3

3

The asymptotic time complexity of the algorithm is, I think,O(n log n).

The outer loop runs for 2 ... sqrt(n). The inner loop runs n / base times, where base is in the outer range of 2 ... sqrt(n).

Running the loops results in total iteration count that can be expressed as:

(1) (n / 2) + (n / 3) + (n / 4) + ... + (n / sqrt(n))

Parentheses above used to denote iteration count of the inner loop within a single iteration of the outer loop.

We can extract n and get

(2) n * (1/2 + 1/3 + 1/4 + ... + 1 / sqrt(n))

The parenthesized term is the harmonic series which is known to be divergent so we don't get aything nice like O(1) there, although the divergence is extremely slow. This is also proved empirically by your chart which looks linear.

It was shown that harmonic series has a constant relationship with ln(n)(source).

Hence, we get n * ln(n) and therefore complexity of O(n log n).

You're not getting the nicer O(n log log n) complexity, because your solution does not use prime factorization (and therefore prime harmonic series which is O(log log n) (source)).

Practically, this is because your algorithm checks non-primes, e.g. the same index in arr[counter * base] = false; is assigned for base and counter pairs {2, 6}, {3, 4}, {4, 3}, {6, 2}, yet base 4 and 6 are already known not to be primes at the point they are applied and by definition of the algorithm, all their multiples are also already known not be primes and therefore it is useless to check them again.

EDIT

An O(n log log n) JavaScript implementation could look like this:

function sieve(n)
{
    // primes[x] contains a bool whether x is a prime
    const primes = new Array(n + 1).fill(true);
    // 0 and 1 are not primes by definition
    primes[0] = false;
    primes[1] = false;

    function square(i)
    {
        return i * i;
    }

    for (let number = 2; square(number) <= n; number += 1)
    {
        if (!primes[number])
        {
            // we have already determined that the number is not a prime
            // therefore all its multiples are also already determined not to be primes
            // skip it
            continue;
        }

        for (let multiplier = 2; multiplier * number <= n; multiplier += 1)
        {
             // a multiple of prime is not a prime
             primes[multiplier * number] = false;
        }
    }

    return primes;    
}

Such an algorithm still runs the outer loop sqrt(n) times but the inner loop is now not ran for each number but only for primes, so for (2) we now get

(2a) n * (1/2 + 1/3 + 1/5 + 1/7 + ... + 1 / (last_prime_less_or_equal_sqrt(n))

As mentioned before, the parenthesized term is prime harmonic sequence with log log n growth. This gets us to O(n log log n) once multiplied by the n.

2

The runtime complexity is O(n*n), because you iterate base and counter up to the wanted value n (where you missed the last value in the comparisons for the loops).

console.time('exec');

function fn(n) {
    var arr = Array.from({ length: n + 1 }, (_, i) => i > 1),
        base = 2,
        counter;

    while (Math.pow(base, 2) <= n) {
        counter = 2;
        while (counter * base <= n) {
            arr[counter * base] = false;
            counter++;
        }
        base++;
    }
    return arr;
}

var arr = fn(Math.pow(10, 2));

console.timeEnd('exec');
// show result
arr.forEach(function(item, index) {
  if (item) {
     console.log(index);
  }
});

1
  • Thank you for your reply. I hoped that complexity is log(log(n)). Because I do not use for loops for each element. Instead, I increased the start point for while loops. And special thank you for the pattern create the array.
    – eustatos
    Commented Feb 10, 2019 at 10:28
0

@ZdeněkJelínek, @NinaScholz, thanks for your help. This is the code based on your suggestions.
Finally, hope that I was able to implement it with complexity O(n log log n).

console.time('exec');
var arr = fn(Math.pow(10, 5));

function fn(n) {
  var arr = Array.apply(null, {
    length: n + 1
  }).map(function(_, i) {
    return i > 1;
  });
  var base = 2;
  while (Math.pow(base, 2) < n) {
    var counter = 2;
    while (counter * base <= n) {
      arr[counter * base] = false;
      do {
        counter++;
      } while (!arr[base]);
    }
    do {
      base++;
    } while (!arr[base]);
  }
  return arr;
}
console.timeEnd('exec');
console.log('array length: ' + arr.length);

// show result
/*
arr.forEach(function(item, index) {
  if (item) {
    console.log(index);
  }
});
*/

2
  • I have updated my answer to contain an implementation in JS. Yours seem to get the gist of it, you just need to use continue instead of looping to really skip the iterations. Also, this solution lacks the <= comparison in the outer loop mentioned by Nina Scholz so your algorithm doesn't work for number inputs that are squares (e.g. fn(4) has number 4 as prime, fn(9) has 9, etc.). Commented Feb 10, 2019 at 21:57
  • As a side note: Unless you are really interested in the academic excercise, I dare say that even your original solution has a great performance and the actual asymptotic complexity class will make any difference only in cases where the arrays are so big that there would probably be bigger effect of cache misses, and possibly even page faults, in practice. Your solution looks linear for numbers up to 10^12 where the array would be around 7TB of memory, assuming 8B doubles with no overhead. Commented Feb 10, 2019 at 22:02

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