1

At first, I used a user-defined convert function to implicitly convert an object to int and then inserted it to cout with << operator. The program was compiled successfully and printed '0'.

#include <iostream>

using namespace std;

class T {
public:
    operator int () {
        return 0;
    }
};

int main()
{
    T a;
    cout << a << endl;
    return 0;
}

Then, I tried to do the same thing except that the object was converted to a std::string. The program got a compile error.

#include <iostream>
#include <string>

using namespace std;

class T {
public:
    operator string () {
        return "";
    }
};

int main()
{
    T a;
    cout << a << endl;
    return 0;
}

Why implicit conversion doesn't happen on the second case.

closed as off-topic by Mat, Neil Butterworth, πάντα ῥεῖ, DebanjanB, Jack Bashford Feb 11 at 0:05

This question appears to be off-topic. The users who voted to close gave this specific reason:

  • "Questions seeking debugging help ("why isn't this code working?") must include the desired behavior, a specific problem or error and the shortest code necessary to reproduce it in the question itself. Questions without a clear problem statement are not useful to other readers. See: How to create a Minimal, Reproducible Example." – Mat, πάντα ῥεῖ, DebanjanB, Jack Bashford
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  • To get the compiler error in the first case as well, use explicit operator int () { return 0; }. – Eljay Feb 10 at 15:19
  • I voted to reopen the question because MCVE has been provided and the question is quite clear now. – songyuanyao Feb 11 at 8:42
7

Why implicit conversion doesn't happen on the second case.

Because operator<<(std::basic_string) is a template function,

template <class CharT, class Traits, class Allocator>
std::basic_ostream<CharT, Traits>& 
    operator<<(std::basic_ostream<CharT, Traits>& os, 
               const std::basic_string<CharT, Traits, Allocator>& str);

That means given T a; cout << a << endl;, for it to be called, all the three template parameters need to be deduced. But in template argument deduction, implicit conversion won't be considered and then deduction fails.

Type deduction does not consider implicit conversions (other than type adjustments listed above): that's the job for overload resolution, which happens later.

On the other hand, std::basic_ostream::operator<<(int) is a non-template function; it doesn't have such issues.

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