16

I was going through the hooks documentation when I stumbled upon useRef.

Looking at their example…

function TextInputWithFocusButton() {
  const inputEl = useRef(null);
  const onButtonClick = () => {
    // `current` points to the mounted text input element
    inputEl.current.focus();
  };
  return (
    <>
      <input ref={inputEl} type="text" />
      <button onClick={onButtonClick}>Focus the input</button>
    </>
  );
}

…it seems like useRef can be replaced with createRef.

function TextInputWithFocusButton() {
  const inputRef = createRef(); // what's the diff?
  const onButtonClick = () => {
    // `current` points to the mounted text input element
    inputRef.current.focus();
  };
  return (
    <>
      <input ref={inputRef} type="text" />
      <button onClick={onButtonClick}>Focus the input</button>
    </>
  );
}

Why do I need a hook for refs? Why does useRef exist?

22

The difference is that createRef will always create a new ref. In a class-based component, you would typically put the ref in an instance property during construction (e.g. this.input = createRef()). You don't have this option in a function component. useRef takes care of returning the same ref each time as on the initial rendering.

Here's an example app demonstrating the difference in the behavior of these two functions:

import React, { useRef, createRef, useState } from "react";
import ReactDOM from "react-dom";

function App() {
  const [renderIndex, setRenderIndex] = useState(1);
  const refFromUseRef = useRef();
  const refFromCreateRef = createRef();
  if (!refFromUseRef.current) {
    refFromUseRef.current = renderIndex;
  }
  if (!refFromCreateRef.current) {
    refFromCreateRef.current = renderIndex;
  }
  return (
    <div className="App">
      Current render index: {renderIndex}
      <br />
      First render index remembered within refFromUseRef.current:
      {refFromUseRef.current}
      <br />
      First render index unsuccessfully remembered within
      refFromCreateRef.current:
      {refFromCreateRef.current}
      <br />
      <button onClick={() => setRenderIndex(prev => prev + 1)}>
        Cause re-render
      </button>
    </div>
  );
}

const rootElement = document.getElementById("root");
ReactDOM.render(<App />, rootElement);

Edit 1rvwnj71x3

11

createRef always returns a new ref, which you'd generally store as a field on a class component's instance. useRef returns the same ref upon every render of a functional component's instance. This is what allows the state of the ref to persist between renders, despite you not explictly storing it anywhere.

In your second example, the ref would be re-created upon every render.

  • This is incorrect, do you have a reference to back up your statement? – Adeel Imran Feb 10 at 20:38
  • There's a comment here by one of the React devs explaining that this is how it works: reddit.com/r/reactjs/comments/a2pt15/… I'd be interested to know what you think is incorrect about this answer. – Joe Clay Feb 10 at 20:40
  • I saw that link before I tried answering this question, where does it state this fact in the link you have shared? I couldn't find it? :) – Adeel Imran Feb 10 at 20:44
  • The link I shared shows a simplified implementation of useRef, posted by one of the React developers. It is not the same as simply calling createRef, as createRef isn't a hook and doesn't persist any state between calls. Ryan Cogswell's answer also has a good example of the differences. – Joe Clay Feb 10 at 20:48
  • 1
    My understanding from that context only inferred that useRef is a custom hook that uses createRef inside. Thank you for sharing the knowledge. – Adeel Imran Feb 10 at 20:52

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.