8

Can a swift switch be exhaustive for type Double without a default case?

This switch (without a default case) gives the error: switch must be exhaustive:

    var minY = 1.0

    switch minY {
    case -(Double.infinity)..<0.9:
        yAxisMinimum = 0.0
    case (0.9..<0.99):
        yAxisMinimum = 0.9
    case (0.99..<0.999):
        yAxisMinimum = 0.99
    case (0.999..<0.9999):
        yAxisMinimum = 0.999
    case (0.9999...Double.infinity):
        yAxisMinimum = 0.9999
    }

But this switch, with the (useless) default case, works:

    var minY = 1.0

    switch minY {
    case -(Double.infinity)..<0.9:
        yAxisMinimum = 0.0
    case (0.9..<0.99):
        yAxisMinimum = 0.9
    case (0.99..<0.999):
        yAxisMinimum = 0.99
    case (0.999..<0.9999):
        yAxisMinimum = 0.999
    case (0.9999...Double.infinity):
        yAxisMinimum = 0.9999
    default:
        yAxisMinimum = 0.0
    }

I try to avoid default cases with my switches, but don't know if that's possible with a Double.

5
  • Well your first switch hasn't covered all cases. You still need to deal with NaNs as well. (Though I have no idea whether that would fix the compiler error.) Feb 10, 2019 at 23:37
  • 1
    You also haven't dealt with inf, either. In any case, I don't think the compiler has a check to determine exhaustivity for ints/doubles
    – Alexander
    Feb 10, 2019 at 23:40
  • 2
    Unrelated : -(Double.infinity)..<0.9 could be written ..<0.9
    – ielyamani
    Feb 10, 2019 at 23:41
  • Well, you can do it without default by using case _: which will match anything, but I know that isn't what you want either.
    – vacawama
    Feb 10, 2019 at 23:42
  • 2
    Possible duplicate of Exhaustive condition of switch case in Swift
    – ielyamani
    Feb 10, 2019 at 23:48

1 Answer 1

11

No because only enum types can be exhaustively checked.

But in this case, the problem is even deeper. Even if Integers could be exhaustively checked, you still couldn't exhaustively check Double without a where clause. One of the options is .nan ("not a number"), which you're not considering. So you might think to just add that case:

case .nan:
    yAxisMinimum = .nan

Not only won't this make it exhaustive, it won't even work the way you'd expect.

var minY = Double.nan

switch minY {
case -(Double.infinity)..<0.9:
    yAxisMinimum = 0.0
// ...
case .nan:
    yAxisMinimum = .nan
default:
    yAxisMinimum = 0
}

yAxisMinimum // 0

Why? Because of this:

var minY = Double.nan
minY == .nan   // false

NaN is unequal to everything, including NaN. So there's no way to include it directly in a switch statement. You have to use a where clause:

case _ where minY.isNaN:
    yAxisMinimum = .nan

And that's definitely beyond the compiler's ability to validate.

1
  • Rob - Your answer brings up a good point, but there are definitely things in Swift other than eNums, that don't require a default. Here is an example straight from the Reference Manual (5.1): let anotherPoint = (2, 0) switch anotherPoint { case (let x, 0): print("on the x-axis with an x value of (x)") case (0, let y): print("on the y-axis with a y value of (y)") case let (x, y): print("somewhere else at ((x), (y))") } // Prints "on the x-axis with an x value of 2"
    – cdeerinck
    Jun 30, 2019 at 23:32

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.