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I have never been in the situation where I originally had two many-to-many's that were resolved. But then down another level is another many-to-many on both of those join tables. I am wondering if there is a better way to architect this w/ entity framework core. Here is what I got. I am trying to figure out which Project Owners are part of which Project Products.

I have 3 tables:

Project
Product
Owner

A Project can have many Products and a Project can have many Owners. A Product can have many Projects and an Owner can have many Projects. I resolved these two many-to-many relationships by doing the following:

ProjectProduct
Two keys: ProjectId, ProductId

ProjectOwner
Two keys: ProjectId, OwnerId

Additionally a ProjectProduct can have many ProjectOwners and a ProjectOwner can have many ProjectsProducts.

I thought the solution would be to add a unique Id to both ProjectOwner and ProjectProduct and create a new entity called ProjectProductOwner with the following keys:
ProjectProductId, ProjectOwnerId

Here is what my DBContext looks like:

// Key Specifications
modelBuilder.Entity<ProjectProductOwner>()
    .HasKey(x => new { x.ProjectProductId, x.ProjectOwnerId });

// Project Product
modelBuilder.Entity<ProjectProduct>()
    .HasOne(x => x.Project)
    .WithMany(x => x.Products)
    .HasForeignKey(x => x.ProjectId);

modelBuilder.Entity<ProjectProduct>()
    .HasOne(x => x.Product)
    .WithMany(x => x.Projects)
    .HasForeignKey(x => x.ProductId);

// Project Owner
modelBuilder.Entity<ProjectOwner>()
    .HasOne(x => x.Project)
    .WithMany(x => x.Owners)
    .HasForeignKey(x => x.ProjectId);

modelBuilder.Entity<ProjectOwner>()
    .HasOne(x => x.Owner)
    .WithMany(x => Projects)
    .HasForeignKey(x => x.OwnerId);

// Project Product Owner
modelBuilder.Entity<ProjectProductOwner>()
    .HasOne(x => x.ProjectProduct)
    .WithMany(x => x.ProjectOwners)
    .HasForeignKey(x => x.ProjectProductId);

modelBuilder.Entity<ProjectProductOwner>()
    .HasOne(x => x.ProjectOwner)
    .WithMany(x => x.ProjectProducts)
    .HasForeignKey(x => x.ProjectOwnerId);  

I am getting the error: Introducing FOREIGN KEY constraint 'FK_ProjectProductOwner_ProjectProducts_ProjectProductId' on table 'ProjectProductOwner' may cause cycles or multiple cascade paths.

additionally:

'FK_ProjectProductOwner_ProjectOwners_ProjectOwnerId' on table 'ProjectProductOwner' may cause cycles or multiple cascade paths.

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  • Why do you need ProjectProductOwner? If you have already a relation between Owner and Project and anotger one between Project and Product I think is enough. If you need Owner Products you just go via Projects. – Lucian Bumb Feb 11 '19 at 5:44
  • @LucianBumb hmm what do you mean just go via projects. Can you elaborate on that. I had a feeling what I was doing was overkill. The order that all of this happens is the following: Owners are added to the Project then a Product is added to the Project along with many Owners (limited to the ones added to the Project earlier). Then another Product can get added to the Project along with one-to-many Owners (limited to the Project owners) again. – Blake Rivell Feb 11 '19 at 6:16
  • I am trying to figure out how to store which Project Owners are part of which Project Products. – Blake Rivell Feb 11 '19 at 6:25
  • Why does adding products also adds more owners? Does this mean that first you need to add Owners to the project, so you can only add products that are "owned" by the already added owners of the project? Also: Is this a new database or something that already exists? – jpgrassi Feb 11 '19 at 8:01
  • @jpgrassi It is a completely new database using EF Core to create it w/ migrations. The order that things are going to happen on the UI is the following. Owners and Products are both configurations in the system. A Project is created by the user. Then a user picks from a multi select many Owners to be part of the Project. Then further down the line a User adds a single Product at a time to the Project but needs to assign which ProjectOwners are managing that Product. The last part is what is messing me all up. – Blake Rivell Feb 11 '19 at 9:26
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You can "merge" the ProjectProduct with the ProjectProductOwner into one table. Since you add Owners to the Project first, then you add one or more Products for each Owner in the Project I don't see a need for a third many-to-many Entity, thus simplifying it a bit :)

Note: I didn't even bother with the error, because as you said and I agree, most often these errors show up when your model isn't correct.

Owner

public class Owner
{
    public int Id { get; set; }
    public string Name { get; set; }
    public ICollection<ProjectOwner> ProjectOwners { get; set; }
    public ICollection<ProjectProductOwner> ProjectProductOwners { get; set; }
}

Product

public class Product
{
    public int Id { get; set; }
    public string Name { get; set; }
    public ICollection<ProjectProductOwner> ProjectProductOwners { get; set; }
}

Project and many-to-many tables

public class Project
{
    public int Id { get; set; }
    public string Name { get; set; }
    public ICollection<ProjectOwner> ProjectOwners { get; set; }
    public ICollection<ProjectProductOwner> ProjectProductOwners { get; set; }

    public Project()
    {
        ProjectOwners = new List<ProjectOwner>();
        ProjectProductOwners = new List<ProjectProductOwner>();
    }
}

public class ProjectOwner
{
    public int OwnerId { get; set; }
    public Owner Owner { get; set; }
    public int ProjectId { get; set; }
    public Project Project { get; set; }
}

public class ProjectProductOwner
{
    public int ProductId { get; set; }
    public Product Product { get; set; }
    public int OwnerId { get; set; }
    public Owner Owner { get; set; }
    public int ProjectId { get; set; }
    public Project Project { get; set; }
}

DbContext configuration

protected override void OnModelCreating(ModelBuilder modelBuilder)
{
    // Configure Owners in a Project
    modelBuilder.Entity<ProjectOwner>()
        .HasKey(p => new { p.ProjectId, p.OwnerId });

    modelBuilder.Entity<ProjectOwner>()
        .HasOne(bc => bc.Project)
        .WithMany(b => b.ProjectOwners)
        .HasForeignKey(bc => bc.ProjectId);

    modelBuilder.Entity<ProjectOwner>()
        .HasOne(bc => bc.Owner)
        .WithMany(c => c.ProjectOwners)
        .HasForeignKey(bc => bc.OwnerId);

    // Configure Products for each owner in a Project
    modelBuilder.Entity<ProjectProductOwner>()
        .HasKey(p => new { p.ProjectId, p.ProductId, p.OwnerId });

    modelBuilder.Entity<ProjectProductOwner>()
        .HasOne(bc => bc.Project)
        .WithMany(b => b.ProjectProductOwners)
        .HasForeignKey(bc => bc.ProjectId);

    modelBuilder.Entity<ProjectProductOwner>()
        .HasOne(bc => bc.Product)
        .WithMany(c => c.ProjectProductOwners)
        .HasForeignKey(bc => bc.ProductId);

    modelBuilder.Entity<ProjectProductOwner>()
        .HasOne(bc => bc.Owner)
        .WithMany(c => c.ProjectProductOwners)
        .HasForeignKey(bc => bc.OwnerId);
}

Finally, you can add new projects and query it with something like this:

using (var db = new ProjectContext())
{
    var project = new Project();
    project.Name = "My project";

    // assumes there's 3 owners and 2 products already inserted in the DB

    // Add the 3 owners to the project
    project.ProjectOwners.Add(new ProjectOwner { OwnerId = 1});
    project.ProjectOwners.Add(new ProjectOwner { OwnerId = 2});
    project.ProjectOwners.Add(new ProjectOwner { OwnerId = 3});

    // Add Product 1 to Owner 1 and 2
    project.ProjectProductOwners.Add(new ProjectProductOwner { ProductId = 1, OwnerId = 1 });
    project.ProjectProductOwners.Add(new ProjectProductOwner { ProductId = 1, OwnerId = 2 });

    // Add Product 2 to Owner 1 and 3
    project.ProjectProductOwners.Add(new ProjectProductOwner { ProductId = 2, OwnerId = 1 });
    project.ProjectProductOwners.Add(new ProjectProductOwner { ProductId = 2, OwnerId = 3 });

    db.Add(project);
    db.SaveChanges();

    var projects = db.Project
        .Include(p => p.ProjectOwners)
        .ThenInclude(p => p.Owner)
        .Include(p => p.ProjectProductOwners)
        .ThenInclude(p => p.Product)
        .FirstOrDefault();
}
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  • Just realized I was thinking about this in the wrong way. Product is actually ProductType. A Project/ProductType/Owner combination isn't always truly unique. There is the rare case that the user can do the following: Within Project1, select ProductType1, select Owner1. Then when adding another combination within Project1 the user selects ProductType1 again, and then selects Owner1 and Owner2. In this case we would have duplicate keys for (Project1.Id/ProductType1.Id/Owner1.Id). Any idea how I can adjust this architecture so this scenario can be handled? – Blake Rivell Feb 16 '19 at 15:28
  • But ProductType1 + Owner1 already exists so you just add ProductType1 + Owner2. No need to create another row for Project1 + ProductType1 + Owner1. You could either check before saving or not even allowing to select Owner1 if that combination is already present :) – jpgrassi Feb 16 '19 at 15:31
  • For instance, when displaying the "dialog" to select the owners after selecting a ProductType you could run a query on Owners where OwnerId does not exist on ProjectProductOwners (meaning, only return the Owners that were not yet assigned for this project and this producttype) – jpgrassi Feb 16 '19 at 15:35
  • What I am saying is that through the UI the user can add the same exact combination. Maybe I should just tell you my real entities instead of using these dummy entities for the example. It is Loan, Borrower, CollateralType. Two borrowers get added to a loan. Then on the next screen the user selects a CollateralType (i.e. Car) and then associates it with borrower(s). Then the user can select another collateral type (could be the same one) and then associates it with borrower(s) (could be the same borrower(s) from the first one) if the Borrower owns two cars they want to collateralize. – Blake Rivell Feb 16 '19 at 16:35
  • I think I got it the first time hehe. Anyway, unless you need to actually count if Borrower1 was added twice for CollateralType1, it doesn't make a difference adding it twice, or? Is CollateralType the same Id in both cases? I guess this is the part which you need to figure it out. If it's the same (like an enum table) then it doesn't make sense to add it twice. – jpgrassi Feb 16 '19 at 16:40

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