66

I am trying to set the state using React hook setState() using the props the component receive. I've tried using the below code:

import React,{useState , useEffect} from 'react';

const Persons = (props) =>  {

    // console.log(props.name);

   const [nameState , setNameState] = useState(props)

   console.log(nameState.name);
   console.log(props.name);

   return (
            <div>
                <p>My name is {props.name} and my age is {props.age}</p>
                <p>My profession is {props.profession}</p>
            </div>
        )

}

export default Persons;

The issue is the state is being set upon component being loaded. But when it receive new props, the state is not getting updated. How to update the state in this case? Thanks in advance.

  • Can you add the code in setNameState. – ManavM Feb 11 '19 at 7:41
  • Hi Manav, so can't we sync props to state using useState upon each time the props get updated..? – METALHEAD Feb 11 '19 at 7:51
  • no, that line is only initializing your state. if you want to update your state every time with props, you will have to use something like useEffect – ManavM Feb 11 '19 at 7:53
100

useState hooks function argument is being used only once and not everytime the prop changes. You must make use of useEffect hooks to implement what you would call the componentWillReceiveProps/getDerivedStateFromProps functionality

import React,{useState , useEffect} from 'react';

const Persons = (props) =>  {
   const [nameState , setNameState] = useState(props)

   useEffect(() => {
       setNameState(props);
   }, [props])

   return (
            <div>
                <p>My name is {props.name} and my age is {props.age}</p>
                <p>My profession is {props.profession}</p>
            </div>
        )

}

export default Persons;
| improve this answer | |
  • 2
    There have been discussions that initializing state from props in an anti-pattern, but since we have hooks, I guess things are changed. But I am not sure. What do you think? – Imdadul Huq Naim May 8 '19 at 17:11
  • 7
    But doing this re-renders the component again right. This was not the case in getDerivedStateFromProps when we are syncing the props to state. – METALHEAD Jul 27 '19 at 3:18
  • 8
    Why do you use props.name and props.age etc. in the return, instead of nameState.name & nameState.age etc. ? – sutherlandahoy Aug 29 '19 at 7:49
  • 6
    This approach looks great, but doesn't this render component twice? Because we are using setState() in useEffect. Doesn't this hit performance? – METALHEAD Feb 4 at 13:20
  • 5
    Wrong answer, this will result in a wasteful, ghost re-rendering. useEffect has no business being used here. The simplest way to do it is: reactjs.org/docs/… There are more advanced techniques applicable in some cases, like coding a useComputedState hook. Some other suggestions: reactjs.org/blog/2018/06/07/… This is a nasty by product of react hooks. – AlexG May 9 at 23:52
8

This general idea can be put into hook:

export function useStateFromProp(initialValue) {
  const [value, setValue] = useState(initialValue);

  useEffect(() => setValue(initialValue), [initialValue]);

  return [value, setValue];
}


function MyComponent({ value: initialValue }) {
  const [value, setValue] = useStateFromProp(initialValue);

  return (...);
}
| improve this answer | |
8

The props value in useState(props) is used only during the initial render, further state updates are done with the setter setNameState.

In addition, there is no need for useEffect when updating derived state:

const Person = props => {
  const [nameState, setNameState] = useState(props.name);
  // update derived state conditionally without useEffect
  if (props.name !== nameState) setNameState(props.name);
  // ... other render code
};

From React docs:

[...] you can update the state right during rendering. React will re-run the component with updated state immediately after exiting the first render so it wouldn’t be expensive.

[...] an update during rendering is exactly what getDerivedStateFromProps has always been like conceptually.

In essence, we can optimize performance by getting rid of an additional browser repaint phase, as useEffect always runs after the render is committed to the screen.

Working example

This is a contrived example illustrating above pattern - in real code you would read props.name directly. See the React blog post for more appropriate derived state use cases.

const Person = props => {
  const [nameState, setNameState] = React.useState(props.name);
  // Here, we update derived state without useEffect
  if (props.name !== nameState) setNameState(props.name);

  return (
    <p>
      <h3>Person</h3>
      <div>{nameState} (from derived state)</div>
      <div>{props.name} (from props)</div>
      <p>Note: Derived state is synchronized/contains same value as props.name</p>
    </p>
  );
};

const App = () => {
  const [personName, setPersonName] = React.useState("Lui");
  const changeName = () => setPersonName(personName === "Lukas" ? "Lui" : "Lukas");

  return (
    <div>
      <Person name={personName} />
      <button onClick={changeName}>Change props</button>
    </div>
  );
};

ReactDOM.render(<App />, document.getElementById("root"));
<script src="https://cdnjs.cloudflare.com/ajax/libs/react/16.13.0/umd/react.production.min.js" integrity="sha256-32Gmw5rBDXyMjg/73FgpukoTZdMrxuYW7tj8adbN8z4=" crossorigin="anonymous"></script>
<script src="https://cdnjs.cloudflare.com/ajax/libs/react-dom/16.13.0/umd/react-dom.production.min.js" integrity="sha256-bjQ42ac3EN0GqK40pC9gGi/YixvKyZ24qMP/9HiGW7w=" crossorigin="anonymous"></script>
<div id="root"></div>

| improve this answer | |
  • But does this hold good if we are getting a whole new object as a prop and we need to sync it to the state. How can we do the deep serach inside an object to check what's changed and what's not? – METALHEAD May 21 at 19:17
  • Not sure, what you are trying to do. Though you would have to write the deep comparison logic manually, like in above code: if (props.name.first !== nameState.first). Or use a deep comparison helper – ford04 May 21 at 20:00
6

For that, you need to use the useEffect so your code looks like. As you want to avoid to re-render again if pros didn't change then you have to check first on useEffect and then set the props to current variable.

import React, { useState, useEffect } from "react";

const Persons = props => {
  // console.log(props.name);

  const [nameState, setNameState] = useState(props);

  console.log(nameState.name);
  console.log(props.name);
  useEffect(
    () => {
      if (nameState !== props.name) {
        setNameState(props.name);
      }
    },
    [nameState]
  );
  return (
    <div>
      <p>
        My name is {props.name} and my age is {props.age}
      </p>
      <p>My profession is {props.profession}</p>
    </div>
  );
};

export default Persons;

Demo

| improve this answer | |
  • 1
    This approach looks great, but doesn't this render component twice? Because we are using setState() in useEffect. Doesn't this hit performance? – METALHEAD Feb 4 at 13:21
  • 1
    @METALHEAD: it will not be called twice because we have also checked if nameState changed then only useEffect should execute, see the second argument of useEffect – Dhaval Patel Feb 5 at 7:57
  • 3
    @DhavalPatel The prop changed triggered a render and the setNameState() triggers another one. Seems like twice to me. – Drazen Bjelovuk Mar 22 at 23:42
1
import React, { useState, useEffect } from "react";

const Persons = props => {
  // console.log(props.name);

  const [nameState, setNameState] = useState(props);

  console.log(nameState.name);
  console.log(props.name);
  useEffect(
    () => {
      if (nameState !== props) {
        setNameState(props);
      }
    },
    [nameState]
  );
  return (
    <div>
      <p>
        My name is {props.name} and my age is {props.age}
      </p>
      <p>My profession is {props.profession}</p>
    </div>
  );
};

export default Persons;

As per the Hooks react document, all the time when any props is update or any update in component is there then useEffect will be called. So you need to check the condition before updating useState and then update your value so that it continuously doesn't do re-rendering

| improve this answer | |
0

I believe the problem indicates an attempt to use one conceptual variable or set of variables to do two different things. For example trying to get props.name and name to do the same thing.

So if

const [name, setName] = useState(props.name)

isn't enough and you find yourself trying to force props.name into state variable name later in the function then maybe name is being overloaded. Try setting up another state variable - eg. updatedName and see if things work better.

The original example doesn't demonstrate this problem since the state variables are never used except in log statements.

If const [name, setName] = useState(props.name) updated on ever re-render there would be no point in having state variable name since it would always be the same as props.name (and further attempts to change it would cause re-render).

| improve this answer | |

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