18

I have encountered this problem while scaling graph, which is drawn over GIS control Greatmap. But a simple experiment persuades me that problems is somewhere deeper in WPF.

Consider simple WPF application:

This is MainWindow.xaml

<Grid>
    <StackPanel>
        <Slider ValueChanged="Size_Changed" Minimum="0" Maximum="300000"/>
        <TextBox x:Name="Value"></TextBox>
    </StackPanel>
    <Canvas>
        <Path x:Name="MyPath" Stroke="Black" StrokeThickness="2" />
    </Canvas>
</Grid>

And this is its code behind

private void Size_Changed(object sender,
        RoutedPropertyChangedEventArgs<double> e)
    {
        if (MyPath == null) return;

        var g = new StreamGeometry();
        using (var s = g.Open())
        {
            var pointA = new Point(0, 200);

            s.BeginFigure(pointA, false, false);

            var pointB = new Point(e.NewValue, 200);

            s.PolyLineTo(new[] {pointB}, true, true);

            Value.Text = $"zoom = {e.NewValue:0.0} ;  pointA = {pointA.X:#,0} ; pointB = {pointB.X:#,0}";
        }

        g.Freeze();

        MyPath.Data = g;
    }

While I drag slider from 0 to 249999 it’s all right. I can see line on my view. But at the very moment slider’s value becomes 250000 – line disappears.

Is there any limitations in WPF ?

  • Could it have something to do with the data type you picked? perhaps you could try to use decimal or float variables instead and see if the problem persist. – Dark Templar Feb 11 at 16:40
  • No, surely I use only double. By the way, just now encoutered the very similar thing in Google Earth. I put the path between points 40,40 and 50,50 and than I start zoom in in the middle of this path and at some scale half of the path disappeared. I don't know what technology Google Earth uses but it was fanny. – mli Feb 12 at 6:46
  • 1
    It's actually related to the proportion between thickness and length of your path/poly line. For stroke thickness 3 line collapses at length 375,000; for stroke thickness 4 it collapses at length 500,000 and so on, at 1/125,000 proportion for thickness/length, for a perfect horizontal line, that is. – jsanalytics Feb 13 at 12:54
  • @jsanalytics But why does it collapse? And only with Point(0, 200), with Point(0.0000001, 200) it doesn't. – Rekshino Feb 13 at 13:12
  • 3
    Such as the hazards of floating point math. That WPF uses double for sizes and locations was wishful thinking from the designers, the backend is still stuck in float land. Where all graphics engines roam. Very well demonstrated by this question. – Hans Passant Feb 13 at 14:41
2
+50

For some reason, the underlying algorithms (could be Direct2D or it's ancestor) considers the ratio StrokeThickness / Geometry extent and decides the stroke is invisible at some point (1 vs 125000). It's also somewhat mentioned here in this other question: WPF DrawGeometry does not draw stroke.

But the stroke is a brush, so you can trick the system like this, using a custom brush, for example in this case:

// use pen size instead of StrokeThickness
var geo = new GeometryDrawing(null, new Pen(Brushes.Black, 2), 
              new RectangleGeometry(new Rect(0, 0, e.NewValue, 1))); // use desired width for the geometry
var brush = new DrawingBrush(geo);
brush.Stretch = Stretch.None; // use this brush size, don't stretch to stroke thickness
brush.Freeze();
MyPath.Stroke = brush;

// choose a big number (more than desired thickness * 125000) to fool WPF or its friends
MyPath.StrokeThickness = 1000;
  • Nice idea! But what to do with arbitrary (not horizontal or vertical) path ? – mli Feb 15 at 9:40
  • @mli - I haven't thought about it. I don't think there are good fixes in all cases. I've also tested Direct2D with an UWP app + Win2D and I don't see any problem. Note the question was posted also here: stackoverflow.com/questions/13731593/… there was a bug reported to connect but now connect has gone and I can't find what was said in that bug report. In any case, it shows Microsoft was aware of this, so it's more a by design limit than a bug... – Simon Mourier Feb 15 at 15:04
0

I see no limitations in WPF. For me it looks like a WPF bug in rendering.

I can only offer a workaround, but I don't know why it causes the issue after 250000. I don't know whether this workaround applicable to your real case. The idea is to use LayoutTransform to draw a horizontal line:

private void Size_Changed(object sender, RoutedPropertyChangedEventArgs<double> e)
{
    if (MyPath == null) return;

    var g = new StreamGeometry();
    using (var s = g.Open())
    {
        var pointA = new Point(0, 200);

        s.BeginFigure(pointA, false, false);

        var pointB = new Point(1, 200);

        s.PolyLineTo(new[] { pointB }, true, true);

        MyPath.LayoutTransform = new ScaleTransform(e.NewValue, 1);

        Value.Text = $"zoom = {e.NewValue:0.0} ;  pointA = {pointA.X:#,0} ; pointB = {pointB.X:#,0}";
    }

    g.Freeze();

    MyPath.Data = g;
}
0

Very exciting issue, I guess it must be a bug. If you changed the pointA as below:

var pointA = new Point(1, 200);

then it would work ... :-)

  • It work's even for Point(0.000000000001, 200), but not for Point(0, 200). – Rekshino Feb 13 at 13:01
  • Possibly a bug??? – Chinh Nguyen Feb 13 at 13:17
0

This appears to be related to the issue described in the the following Horizontal or vertical WPF Lines limited to 125,000 pixels?

There appears to be a maximum length to stroke width to length ratio in WPF relating to how the graphics are rendered - which could be dictated by the graphics rendering. It the stroke width is varied the following can be observed:

  • If the stroke width is 1 : max length allowed is 125,000
  • If the stroke width is 2 : max length allowed is 250,000
  • If the stroke width is 3 : the max length allowed is 375,000

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