1

I'm developing a NodeJS web app to receive Real Time updates from Firestore DB through Admin SDK.

This is the init code for the Firestore object. It's executed just once, when the app is deployed (on AWS Elastic Beanstalk):

const admin = require('firebase-admin');

var serviceAccount = require('./../key.json');

admin.initializeApp({
    credential: admin.credential.cert(serviceAccount)
});

var db = admin.firestore();

FUNC.firestore = db;

Then I use this firestore object in a websocket comunication to send realtime updates to browser. The idea is to use the server as a proxy between browser and Firestore.

socket.on('open', function (client) {
    var query = FUNC.firestore.collection("notifications").doc(client.user.id.toString()).collection("global");
    query.onSnapshot(querySnapshot => {
        querySnapshot.docChanges().forEach(change => {
            client.send({ id: change.doc.id, body: change.doc.data(), type: change.type });
        });
    }, err => {
        console.log(`Encountered error: ${err}`);
    });
});

socket.on('close', function (client) {
    var unsub = FUNC.firestore.collection("notifications").doc(client.user.id.toString()).collection("global").onSnapshot(() => {
    });
    unsub();
});

It works well for a while, but after few hours the client stop receiving onSnapshot() updates, and after a while the server log the error: Encountered error: Error: 10 ABORTED: The operation was aborted.

What's wrong? Should I initialized firestore on each connection? Is there some lifecycle mistake?

Thank you

EDIT (A very bad solution)

I've tried to create a single firebase-admin app instance for each logged user and changed my code in this way

const admin = require('firebase-admin');

var serviceAccount = require('./../key.json');

admin.initializeApp({
  credential: admin.credential.cert(serviceAccount)
});

FUNC.getFirestore = function (user) {
  try {
    user.firebase = admin.app(user.id.toString());
    return user.firebase.firestore();
  } catch(e) {
    //ignore
  }

  var app = admin.initializeApp({
    credential: admin.credential.cert(serviceAccount)
  }, user.id.toString());

  user.firebase = app;

  return user.firebase.firestore();
}

FUNC.removeFirebase = function (user) {
  if (user.firebase) {
    user.firebase.delete();
  }
}

And then socket listeners:

    self.on('open', function (client) {
        var query = FUNC.getFirestore(client.user).collection("notifications").doc(client.user.id.toString()).collection("global");
        query.onSnapshot(querySnapshot => {
            querySnapshot.docChanges().reverse();
            querySnapshot.docChanges().forEach(change => {
                client.send({ id: change.doc.id, body: change.doc.data(), type: change.type });
            });
        }, err => {
            console.log(`Encountered error: ${err}`);
        });
    });

    self.on('close', function (client) {
        var unsub = FUNC.getFirestore(client.user).collection("notifications").doc(client.user.id.toString()).collection("global").onSnapshot(() => {
        });
        unsub();
        FUNC.removeFirebase(client.user);
});

So when a client disconnect for a reason the server removes its firebase app, it works, but I've noticed a huge memory leak on server, I need some help

  • Please check in google-cloud-firestore documentation limits. Either you have reached the firebase connection time limit or the session operation limit. Detect this situation and re-establish the connection. Or better periodically test connection status. – bato3 Feb 11 at 16:55
  • I see, so according to you, is better to have a single firebase-admin instance and check connection timeouts, ore use multiple firebase-admin instances (one for each logged user)? – Philip Feb 11 at 23:15
  • IDK, I don't know firebase, but standard for websockets is one datasource and broadcasting results for al users. Finally life will show what is possible to do ;) – bato3 Feb 11 at 23:25
  • And I think I know why you do not work. If one of the recipients closes the connection from the websocket, then you end up connecting to firesotre for everyone. Or I do not know myself anymore, you create a new connection for each client... Please check this, how to send broadcast message stackoverflow.com/q/41773965/1194525 – bato3 Feb 11 at 23:33
  • No no, when a client disconnect I close only onSnapshot listener for that specific user collection, not the whole firebase connection, indeed for some hours it works well (tested with 20 users connected). Anyway I'm making more test so I could add more details to my question – Philip Feb 12 at 8:33
0

Finally I can answar from myself. First of all the second solution I've tried is a very bad one, because each new app created through Admin SDK is stored in RAM, with 20/30 users the app reaches more then 1GB of RAM, absolutely unacceptable.

So the first implementation was the better solution, anyway I've wrong the register/unregister onSnapshot listener lifecycle. Each onSnapshot() call returns a different function, even if called on the same reference. So, instead of close the listener when socket close, I opened another one. This is how should be:

socket.on('open', function (client) {
    var query = FUNC.firestore.collection("notifications").doc(client.user.id.toString()).collection("global");
    client.user.firestoreUnsub = query.onSnapshot(querySnapshot => {
        querySnapshot.docChanges().forEach(change => {
            client.send({ id: change.doc.id, body: change.doc.data(), type: change.type });
        });
    }, err => {
        console.log(`Encountered error: ${err}`);
    });
});

socket.on('close', function (client) {
    client.user.firestoreUnsub();
});

After almost 48h, listeners still works without problems and no memory leaks occurs.

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