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The iterative function returns the result of a factorial operation. The code seems to break after I try to compute a number that will result in an integer overflow. How could I best handle this? Would it make sense and is it accurate? to store every iteration over the maximum limit as a power of and return the limit plus a character string describing the amount of times it can be multiplied by itself?

int ft_iterative_factorial(int nb)
{
  int i;
  int n;
  int res;

  i = 1;
  n = nb;
  res = nb;
  while (i < nb)
  {
    if (nb == 1 || nb == 0)
    {
      res = 1;
      break ;
    }
    res = res * (n - 1);
    i++;
    n--;
  }
  return ((nb < 0 || nb > 31) ? 0 : res);
}
  • 2
    You can use long long, which is capable of holding any integer less than 2^63. – L. F. Feb 11 at 12:43
  • 2
    What's the largest value of nb for which you require nb!? – Bathsheba Feb 11 at 12:53
  • Figured the "Selected members of the factorial sequence" on the right side of the wikipedia page: "Factorial" would be a point of reference for the implementation... so ehm 1000 000 I guess? – Mike Feb 11 at 15:07
  • If I go over 31!, that is 32!, it returns -2147483648, and everything passed that will just give 0. – Mike Feb 11 at 15:29
3

Your function is really complicated.

Consider rather this implementation:

int ft_iterative_factorial(int nb)
{
  int res = 1;

  for (int i = 2; i <= nb; i++)
  {
    res = res * i;
  }

  return res;
}

Your test return ( nb < 0 ? 0 : res); doesn't make much sense after the loop, you should do it before the loop, and nor does if (nb == 1 || nb == 0) inside the loop. But these tests are pointless anyway in my code.

int is probably a 32 bit type and 32 bits is not enough to store 16!.

Either use long long (usually 64 bit) instead of int (but then you'd be limited at 21 or so), or handle cases where value >16 otherwise.

BTW: if you really want to be fast, don't calculate the factorial but use a lookup table, this is left as an exercise to the reader.

  • @EricPostpischil you're right, I misread the OP's totally convoluted and incredibly complicated code. Editing. Thanks. – Jabberwocky Feb 11 at 13:41
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Either use a long long or try to optimise your computations if possible.

At last, an alternative is to search for big integer libraries.

  • “ Optimise” is usually used to describe performance, not supporting larger numbers. – Eric Postpischil Feb 11 at 13:41
  • In the past,I had to compute small numbers based on huge computation, and with optimisation I was able to code it fully with ìnt only. – AfroDisco Feb 11 at 16:42
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You are using signed integers to compute and a signed integer overflow is undefined behaviour. So whatever your code returns it correct according to the C standard. What usually happens is that you simply get the lower bits of the right result. Which, since it's signed int, can be negative.

If you only want to get an approximate result for large numbers then why not change your code to use double? For small numbers like 3! you would still get 6 but past 17 or so you get something like 4.643+E8, meaning 4.643 * 10^8. The double type will eventually run out of exponents but it gets you a lot further than even unsigned long long.

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For capable maximum factorial, you can use unsigned long long for return type of this function. And your function is recursive style, the running time is slower then non-recursive style. I think here is a good solution

unsigned long long ft_iterative_factorial(int nb)
{
    unsigned long long result = 1;

    for (int i = 2; i <= nb; i++)
    {
        result = result * (unsigned long long)i;
    }

    return result;
}

int main()
{
    cout << ft_iterative_factorial(17) << endl;
    return 0;
}
  • uintmax_t could be wider than unsigned long long, making it a better choice for maximal range. – Toby Speight Feb 11 at 17:33

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