1

I have design requirement to be able to save an IPv6 address in a decimal format. In java I have BigInteger that can hold 40 digit number and Oracle takes it via JDBC driver just fine.

How can do this in Elastic or Mongo DB. From what I read, max numbers supported in elastic or mongodb are 64bit bigint numbers. For e.g. if i convert

 FFFF:FFFF:FFFF:FFFF:FFFF:FFFF:FFFF:FFFF, 

decimal format is

 340282366920938463463374607431768211455 (total of 39 digits). 

What is the best way to solve this in elastic or mongo. I need to be able to run range functions (=,<,<=,>=) on this field to search the documents.

2

Starting from Elasticserch 5.0 there is an ip field type, which supports both IPv4 and IPv6.

I would recommend to go with this one, in Elasticsearch, rather than do integer/string conversion.

The reason for this is that it’s naturally support subnet style queries, which I think is quite handy. E.g.

GET index/_search
{
    “query”: {
        “term”: {
            “ip_addr”: “2001:db8::/48”
        }
    }
}

Range queries are supported as well for this field type

  • Yes, i have tried that. I am using ip type to store actual IP address, but i need to see if I can store decimal as well. Ofcourse if its not possible, i will have to rely on this type. – Sannu Feb 11 at 13:58
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    @Sannu Just use the fields feature to index the IP address as an IP as well as a number. For 39 digits, you'd probably want to use a double. – dmbaughman Feb 11 at 21:57
  • @dmbaughman, i use fields to store other stuff such as text and raw of same text field. But in this case, i need to find a way to store 128 bit decimal. Double and long dont offer enough space. Not sure if there is a way to split this large number into 3 or 4 smaller number and still run queries on these. – Sannu Feb 12 at 14:14

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