413

I am using the datetime Python module. I am looking to calculate the date 6 months from the current date. Could someone give me a little help doing this?

The reason I want to generate a date 6 months from the current date is to produce a review date. If the user enters data into the system it will have a review date of 6 months from the date they entered the data.

  • 2
    You will have to be more specific : when is six months from march 31th? And from august 30th? – kmkaplan Feb 13 '09 at 15:21
  • 3
    Yes the edit helps: it means you can aproximate 6 months to 183 days with no ill effect. So adding 183 days to today will do the trick. – kmkaplan Feb 13 '09 at 16:42
  • 15
    The above comments strike me as silly. The concept of "adding six months" is quite clear -- take the month component and add 6 to it, with support for rolling over the year (and cycling the month back to 1) if we go past December. This happens to be exactly what relativedelta does and is in fact what every programming language with support for this sort of concept does. – Kirk Woll Jul 18 '12 at 18:30
  • 5
    @KirkWoll: I am sure it is quite clear. But still different for whoever speaks. Python: date(2015, 3, 31) + relativedelta(months = 6) gives datetime.date(2015, 9, 30). Perl: DateTime->new(year=>2000, month=>3, day=>31)->add(months=>6) gives 2000-10-01T00:00:00. Php: date_create('2000-03-31', new DateTimeZone('UTC'))->add(new DateInterval('P6M')) gives 2000-10-01. Pick your poison. – kmkaplan Feb 10 '15 at 10:12
  • 2
    ... adding 182 seems more pragmatic for generating a review date: it keeps the day of the week intact. – Wolf Mar 27 '19 at 11:35

43 Answers 43

1084

I found this solution to be good. (This uses the python-dateutil extension)

from datetime import date
from dateutil.relativedelta import relativedelta

six_months = date.today() + relativedelta(months=+6)

The advantage of this approach is that it takes care of issues with 28, 30, 31 days etc. This becomes very useful in handling business rules and scenarios (say invoice generation etc.)

$ date(2010,12,31)+relativedelta(months=+1)
  datetime.date(2011, 1, 31)

$ date(2010,12,31)+relativedelta(months=+2)
  datetime.date(2011, 2, 28)
| improve this answer | |
  • 4
    the +6 is an indicator that it could be -6, same thing applies to days and years as well :) – securecurve Feb 20 '13 at 11:04
  • 5
    @sliders_alpha You need to install the python-dateutil package (pip install python-dateutil) – poiuytrez Nov 19 '13 at 15:29
  • 19
    This is the correct solution. If the OP would have asked 6 years instead of 6 months, then the approved answer would fail miserably. So one should keep in mind that the answers are more valuable the more generalized they are. – Daniel F May 24 '14 at 20:34
  • 4
    Kindly note that the relativedelta function also takes in month as an argument, which basically replaces / sets / fixes month in the passed date, which is very different than adding more months. Just a forewarning for folks wondering if the function is broken because they forgot the extra s in months. – shad0w_wa1k3r Jul 30 '19 at 9:19
  • 1
    I'm curious: does anyone know why this isn't included by default? Timedelta seems packaged with datetime by default. I actually assumed I could pass "months" into timedelta. – dTanMan Nov 12 '19 at 3:14
55

Well, that depends what you mean by 6 months from the current date.

  1. Using natural months:

    (day, month, year) = (day, (month + 5) % 12 + 1, year + (month + 5)/12)
    
  2. Using a banker's definition, 6*30:

    date += datetime.timedelta(6 * 30)
    
| improve this answer | |
  • 3
    Could you throw in the half-year definition (183 days) plus the 26 weeks definition, too? It helps to have them all in one place. – S.Lott Feb 13 '09 at 18:02
  • 11
    just a quick remark: I think, for month, the formula would be instead (month + 5) % 12 + 1 b/c for june, your formula gives 0 whereas the expected result is 12... despite this little error, to my mind, your answer is the one that best answers the question – PierrOz Mar 15 '10 at 16:02
  • 3
    and same for year: it should be year + (month + 5)/12 – PierrOz Mar 15 '10 at 16:15
  • 9
    What if the date is 31, and the month six month later can't have 31 days (which is the case for most months with 31 days)? – akv Apr 6 '11 at 11:37
  • 5
    Downvote because the first solution (day, month, year) = (day, (month+6)%12, year+(month+6)/12) can buggy, as it generates invalid dates such as (31, 8, 2015) -> (31, 2, 2016) – ohw Jan 16 '16 at 23:40
39

With Python 3.x you can do it like this:

from datetime import datetime, timedelta
from dateutil.relativedelta import *

date = datetime.now()
print(date)
# 2018-09-24 13:24:04.007620

date = date + relativedelta(months=+6)
print(date)
# 2019-03-24 13:24:04.007620

but you will need to install python-dateutil module:

pip install python-dateutil
| improve this answer | |
  • I'd recommend from dateutil.relativedelta import relativedelta. Using import * isn't explicit. – Sam Morgan Apr 29 at 13:55
19

For beginning of month to month calculation:

from datetime import timedelta
from dateutil.relativedelta import relativedelta

end_date = start_date + relativedelta(months=delta_period) + timedelta(days=-delta_period)
| improve this answer | |
  • 18
    This isn't the relativedelta solution mentioned above in the comments. Keep scrolling for the solution with 600+ upvotes. – Nostalg.io Feb 12 '18 at 20:16
16

What do you mean by "6 months"?

Is 2009-02-13 + 6 months == 2009-08-13? Or is it 2009-02-13 + 6*30 days?

import mx.DateTime as dt

#6 Months
dt.now()+dt.RelativeDateTime(months=6)
#result is '2009-08-13 16:28:00.84'

#6*30 days
dt.now()+dt.RelativeDateTime(days=30*6)
#result is '2009-08-12 16:30:03.35'

More info about mx.DateTime

| improve this answer | |
15

This solution works correctly for December, which most of the answers on this page do not. You need to first shift the months from base 1 (ie Jan = 1) to base 0 (ie Jan = 0) before using modulus ( % ) or integer division ( // ), otherwise November (11) plus 1 month gives you 12, which when finding the remainder ( 12 % 12 ) gives 0.

(And dont suggest "(month % 12) + 1" or Oct + 1 = december!)

def AddMonths(d,x):
    newmonth = ((( d.month - 1) + x ) % 12 ) + 1
    newyear  = int(d.year + ((( d.month - 1) + x ) / 12 ))
    return datetime.date( newyear, newmonth, d.day)

However ... This doesnt account for problem like Jan 31 + one month. So we go back to the OP - what do you mean by adding a month? One solution is to backtrack until you get to a valid day, given that most people would presume the last day of jan, plus one month, equals the last day of Feb. This will work on negative numbers of months too. Proof:

>>> import datetime
>>> AddMonths(datetime.datetime(2010,8,25),1)
datetime.date(2010, 9, 25)
>>> AddMonths(datetime.datetime(2010,8,25),4)
datetime.date(2010, 12, 25)
>>> AddMonths(datetime.datetime(2010,8,25),5)
datetime.date(2011, 1, 25)
>>> AddMonths(datetime.datetime(2010,8,25),13)
datetime.date(2011, 9, 25)
>>> AddMonths(datetime.datetime(2010,8,25),24)
datetime.date(2012, 8, 25)
>>> AddMonths(datetime.datetime(2010,8,25),-1)
datetime.date(2010, 7, 25)
>>> AddMonths(datetime.datetime(2010,8,25),0)
datetime.date(2010, 8, 25)
>>> AddMonths(datetime.datetime(2010,8,25),-12)
datetime.date(2009, 8, 25)
>>> AddMonths(datetime.datetime(2010,8,25),-8)
datetime.date(2009, 12, 25)
>>> AddMonths(datetime.datetime(2010,8,25),-7)
datetime.date(2010, 1, 25)>>> 
| improve this answer | |
  • 3
    Fixes the "Jan 31 + one month" problem: days_in_month = calendar.monthrange(newyear, newmonth)[1]; newday = min(d.day, days_in_month); (bumps the day down if too big eg Feb 31 to Feb 28/29) – Curtis Yallop Nov 30 '15 at 18:33
  • This worked for me only by converting the newyear to an integer data type def AddMonths(d,x): newmonth = ((( d.month - 1) + x ) % 12 ) + 1 newyear = d.year + int((( d.month - 1) + x ) / 12 ) return datetime.date( newyear, newmonth, d.day) – Manmeet Singh Nov 29 '19 at 10:28
14

So, here is an example of the dateutil.relativedelta which I found useful for iterating through the past year, skipping a month each time to the present date:

>>> import datetime
>>> from dateutil.relativedelta import relativedelta
>>> today = datetime.datetime.today()
>>> month_count = 0
>>> while month_count < 12:
...  day = today - relativedelta(months=month_count)
...  print day
...  month_count += 1
... 
2010-07-07 10:51:45.187968
2010-06-07 10:51:45.187968
2010-05-07 10:51:45.187968
2010-04-07 10:51:45.187968
2010-03-07 10:51:45.187968
2010-02-07 10:51:45.187968
2010-01-07 10:51:45.187968
2009-12-07 10:51:45.187968
2009-11-07 10:51:45.187968
2009-10-07 10:51:45.187968
2009-09-07 10:51:45.187968
2009-08-07 10:51:45.187968

As with the other answers, you have to figure out what you actually mean by "6 months from now." If you mean "today's day of the month in the month six years in the future" then this would do:

datetime.datetime.now() + relativedelta(months=6)
| improve this answer | |
12

I know this was for 6 months, however the answer shows in google for "adding months in python" if you are adding one month:

import calendar

date = datetime.date.today()    //Or your date

datetime.timedelta(days=calendar.monthrange(date.year,date.month)[1])

this would count the days in the current month and add them to the current date, using 365/12 would ad 1/12 of a year can causes issues for short / long months if your iterating over the date.

| improve this answer | |
11

There's no direct way to do it with Python's datetime.

Check out the relativedelta type at python-dateutil. It allows you to specify a time delta in months.

| improve this answer | |
10

Just use the timetuple method to extract the months, add your months and build a new dateobject. If there is a already existing method for this I do not know it.

import datetime

def in_the_future(months=1):
    year, month, day = datetime.date.today().timetuple()[:3]
    new_month = month + months
    return datetime.date(year + (new_month / 12), (new_month % 12) or 12, day)

The API is a bit clumsy, but works as an example. Will also obviously not work on corner-cases like 2008-01-31 + 1 month. :)

| improve this answer | |
  • 3
    Error in your code: new_month % 12 should be (new_month % 12) or 12. Otherwise if you try this in November you will get an error. :) – Jordan Reiter May 2 '11 at 21:45
  • This is actually much cleaner than the accepted solution. This doesn't require any new import, just basic maths – Simon PA Apr 2 '19 at 16:26
  • return datetime.date(year + (new_month/ / 12), (new_month % 12) or 12, day) – paytam Apr 19 at 5:57
9

Dateutil package has implementation of such functionality. But be aware, that this will be naive, as others pointed already.

| improve this answer | |
  • dateutil is awesome. It can be installed with easy_install too. – Soviut Feb 13 '09 at 15:42
  • Excellent. Thanks for suggesting that. That seems to be a god-sent. – ayaz Apr 21 '10 at 7:38
9

Using Python standard libraries, i.e. without dateutil or others, and solving the 'February 31st' problem:

import datetime
import calendar

def add_months(date, months):
    months_count = date.month + months

    # Calculate the year
    year = date.year + int(months_count / 12)

    # Calculate the month
    month = (months_count % 12)
    if month == 0:
        month = 12

    # Calculate the day
    day = date.day
    last_day_of_month = calendar.monthrange(year, month)[1]
    if day > last_day_of_month:
        day = last_day_of_month

    new_date = datetime.date(year, month, day)
    return new_date

Testing:

>>>date = datetime.date(2018, 11, 30)

>>>print(date, add_months(date, 3))
(datetime.date(2018, 11, 30), datetime.date(2019, 2, 28))

>>>print(date, add_months(date, 14))
(datetime.date(2018, 12, 31), datetime.date(2020, 2, 29))
| improve this answer | |
  • This has a bug: If the target month is December, it will return a date one year later than needed. Example: add_months(datetime.date(2018, 11, 30), 1) returns datetime.date(2019, 12, 30) (the year should be 2018, not 2019). So, better use a dedicated, well tested library for this! If you really need to only use standard library modules, see my answer to a similar question. – taleinat May 6 at 15:40
5

I have a better way to solve the 'February 31st' problem:

def add_months(start_date, months):
    import calendar

    year = start_date.year + (months / 12)
    month = start_date.month + (months % 12)
    day = start_date.day

    if month > 12:
        month = month % 12
        year = year + 1

    days_next = calendar.monthrange(year, month)[1]
    if day > days_next:
        day = days_next

    return start_date.replace(year, month, day)

I think that it also works with negative numbers (to subtract months), but I haven't tested this very much.

| improve this answer | |
  • 1
    This answer has the merit of correctly solving the problem using only built-in Python libraries. Check stackoverflow.com/a/4131114/302264 for an equivalent but slightly more concise answer. – Eduardo Dobay Apr 4 '18 at 12:23
5

This doesn't answer the specific question (using datetime only) but, given that others suggested the use of different modules, here there is a solution using pandas.

import datetime as dt
import pandas as pd

date = dt.date.today() - \
       pd.offsets.DateOffset(months=6)

print(date)

2019-05-04 00:00:00

Which works as expected in leap years

date = dt.datetime(2019,8,29) - \
       pd.offsets.DateOffset(months=6)
print(date)

2019-02-28 00:00:00
| improve this answer | |
4

The QDate class of PyQt4 has an addmonths function.

>>>from PyQt4.QtCore import QDate  
>>>dt = QDate(2009,12,31)  
>>>required = dt.addMonths(6) 

>>>required
PyQt4.QtCore.QDate(2010, 6, 30)

>>>required.toPyDate()
datetime.date(2010, 6, 30)
| improve this answer | |
3

How about this? Not using another library (dateutil) or timedelta? building on vartec's answer I did this and I believe it works:

import datetime

today = datetime.date.today()
six_months_from_today = datetime.date(today.year + (today.month + 6)/12, (today.month + 6) % 12, today.day)

I tried using timedelta, but because it is counting the days, 365/2 or 6*356/12 does not always translate to 6 months, but rather 182 days. e.g.

day = datetime.date(2015, 3, 10)
print day
>>> 2015-03-10

print (day + datetime.timedelta(6*365/12))
>>> 2015-09-08

I believe that we usually assume that 6 month's from a certain day will land on the same day of the month but 6 months later (i.e. 2015-03-10 --> 2015-09-10, Not 2015-09-08)

I hope you find this helpful.

| improve this answer | |
  • 1
    day + datetime.timedelta(6*365/12) won't work always, as some years have 365 days and others have 366 days. – 3kstc Jan 8 '18 at 7:12
2

Modified the AddMonths() for use in Zope and handling invalid day numbers:

def AddMonths(d,x):
    days_of_month = [31, 28, 31, 30, 31, 30, 31, 31, 30, 31, 30, 31]
    newmonth = ((( d.month() - 1) + x ) % 12 ) + 1
    newyear  = d.year() + ((( d.month() - 1) + x ) // 12 ) 
    if d.day() > days_of_month[newmonth-1]:
      newday = days_of_month[newmonth-1]
    else:
      newday = d.day() 
    return DateTime( newyear, newmonth, newday)
| improve this answer | |
  • This does not seem to consider leap years (29 days in feb). – handle Apr 4 '18 at 12:19
2
import time

def add_month(start_time, months):  

        ret = time.strptime(start_time, '%Y-%m-%d')
        t = list(ret)

        t[1] += months

        if t[1] > 12:
            t[0] += 1 + int(months / 12)

            t[1] %= 12

        return int(time.mktime(tuple(t)))
| improve this answer | |
1
import datetime


'''
Created on 2011-03-09

@author: tonydiep
'''

def add_business_months(start_date, months_to_add):
    """
    Add months in the way business people think of months. 
    Jan 31, 2011 + 1 month = Feb 28, 2011 to business people
    Method: Add the number of months, roll back the date until it becomes a valid date
    """
    # determine year
    years_change = months_to_add / 12

    # determine if there is carryover from adding months
    if (start_date.month + (months_to_add % 12) > 12 ):
        years_change = years_change + 1

    new_year = start_date.year + years_change

    # determine month
    work = months_to_add % 12
    if 0 == work:
        new_month = start_date.month
    else:
        new_month = (start_date.month + (work % 12)) % 12

    if 0 == new_month:
        new_month = 12 

    # determine day of the month
    new_day = start_date.day
    if(new_day in [31, 30, 29, 28]):
        #user means end of the month
        new_day = 31


    new_date = None
    while (None == new_date and 27 < new_day):
        try:
            new_date = start_date.replace(year=new_year, month=new_month, day=new_day)
        except:
            new_day = new_day - 1   #wind down until we get to a valid date

    return new_date


if __name__ == '__main__':
    #tests
    dates = [datetime.date(2011, 1, 31),
             datetime.date(2011, 2, 28),
             datetime.date(2011, 3, 28),
             datetime.date(2011, 4, 28),
             datetime.date(2011, 5, 28),
             datetime.date(2011, 6, 28),
             datetime.date(2011, 7, 28),
             datetime.date(2011, 8, 28),
             datetime.date(2011, 9, 28),
             datetime.date(2011, 10, 28),
             datetime.date(2011, 11, 28),
             datetime.date(2011, 12, 28),
             ]
    months = range(1, 24)
    for start_date in dates:
        for m in months:
            end_date = add_business_months(start_date, m)
            print("%s\t%s\t%s" %(start_date, end_date, m))
| improve this answer | |
1

Modified Johannes Wei's answer in the case 1new_month = 121. This works perfectly for me. The months could be positive or negative.

def addMonth(d,months=1):
    year, month, day = d.timetuple()[:3]
    new_month = month + months
    return datetime.date(year + ((new_month-1) / 12), (new_month-1) % 12 +1, day)
  • 2
    It DOESN'T "work perfectly" when the day in the start date is greater than the number of days in the target month. Example: 2001-01-31 plus one month tries to create a date 2001-02-31. – John Machin Jan 16 '10 at 9:25
1

Yet another solution - hope someone will like it:

def add_months(d, months):
    return d.replace(year=d.year+months//12).replace(month=(d.month+months)%12)

This solution doesn't work for days 29,30,31 for all cases, so more robust solution is needed (which is not so nice anymore :) ):

def add_months(d, months):
    for i in range(4):
        day = d.day - i
        try:
            return d.replace(day=day).replace(year=d.year+int(months)//12).replace(month=(d.month+int(months))%12)
        except:
            pass
    raise Exception("should not happen")
| improve this answer | |
1

From this answer, see parsedatetime. Code example follows. More details: unit test with many natural-language -> YYYY-MM-DD conversion examples, and apparent parsedatetime conversion challenges/bugs.

#!/usr/bin/env python
# -*- coding: utf-8 -*-
import time, calendar
from datetime import date

# from https://github.com/bear/parsedatetime
import parsedatetime as pdt

def print_todays_date():
    todays_day_of_week = calendar.day_name[date.today().weekday()]
    print "today's date = " + todays_day_of_week + ', ' + \
                              time.strftime('%Y-%m-%d')

def convert_date(natural_language_date):
    cal = pdt.Calendar()
    (struct_time_date, success) = cal.parse(natural_language_date)
    if success:
        formal_date = time.strftime('%Y-%m-%d', struct_time_date)
    else:
        formal_date = '(conversion failed)'
    print '{0:12s} -> {1:10s}'.format(natural_language_date, formal_date)

print_todays_date()
convert_date('6 months')

The above code generates the following from a MacOSX machine:

$ ./parsedatetime_simple.py 
today's date = Wednesday, 2015-05-13
6 months     -> 2015-11-13
$ 
| improve this answer | |
1

Here's a example which allows the user to decide how to return a date where the day is greater than the number of days in the month.

def add_months(date, months, endOfMonthBehaviour='RoundUp'):
    assert endOfMonthBehaviour in ['RoundDown', 'RoundIn', 'RoundOut', 'RoundUp'], \
        'Unknown end of month behaviour'
    year = date.year + (date.month + months - 1) / 12
    month = (date.month + months - 1) % 12 + 1
    day = date.day
    last = monthrange(year, month)[1]
    if day > last:
        if endOfMonthBehaviour == 'RoundDown' or \
            endOfMonthBehaviour == 'RoundOut' and months < 0 or \
            endOfMonthBehaviour == 'RoundIn' and months > 0:
            day = last
        elif endOfMonthBehaviour == 'RoundUp' or \
            endOfMonthBehaviour == 'RoundOut' and months > 0 or \
            endOfMonthBehaviour == 'RoundIn' and months < 0:
            # we don't need to worry about incrementing the year
            # because there will never be a day in December > 31
            month += 1
            day = 1
    return datetime.date(year, month, day)


>>> from calendar import monthrange
>>> import datetime
>>> add_months(datetime.datetime(2016, 1, 31), 1)
datetime.date(2016, 3, 1)
>>> add_months(datetime.datetime(2016, 1, 31), -2)
datetime.date(2015, 12, 1)
>>> add_months(datetime.datetime(2016, 1, 31), -2, 'RoundDown')
datetime.date(2015, 11, 30)
| improve this answer | |
1

given that your datetime variable is called date:

date=datetime.datetime(year=date.year+int((date.month+6)/12),
                       month=(date.month+6)%13 + (1 if (date.month + 
                       months>12) else 0), day=date.day)
| improve this answer | |
1

General function to get next date after/before x months.

from datetime import date

def after_month(given_date, month):
    yyyy = int(((given_date.year * 12 + given_date.month) + month)/12)
    mm = int(((given_date.year * 12 + given_date.month) + month)%12)

    if mm == 0:
        yyyy -= 1
        mm = 12
    return given_date.replace(year=yyyy, month=mm)


if __name__ == "__main__":
    today = date.today()
    print(today)

    for mm in [-12, -1, 0, 1, 2, 12, 20 ]:
        next_date = after_month(today, mm)
        print(next_date)
| improve this answer | |
  • This is clearly the best answer. Simple and effective, without rounding issues. – jprobichaud Apr 3 '18 at 15:08
1

A quick suggestion is Arrow

pip install arrow

>>> import arrow

>>> arrow.now().date()
datetime.date(2019, 6, 28)
>>> arrow.now().shift(months=6).date()
datetime.date(2019, 12, 28)
| improve this answer | |
1

The "python-dateutil" (external extension) is a good solution, but you can do it with build-in Python modules (datetime and datetime)

I made a short and simple code, to solve it (dealing with year, month and day)

(running: Python 3.8.2)

from datetime import datetime
from calendar import monthrange

# Time to increase (in months)
inc = 12

# Returns mod of the division for 12 (months)
month = ((datetime.now().month + inc) % 12) or 1

# Increase the division by 12 (months), if necessary (+ 12 months increase)
year = datetime.now().year + int((month + inc) / 12)

# (IF YOU DON'T NEED DAYS,CAN REMOVE THE BELOW CODE)
# Returns the same day in new month, or the maximum day of new month
day = min(datetime.now().day,monthrange(year, month)[1])

print("Year: {}, Month: {}, Day: {}".format(year, month, day))
| improve this answer | |
0

This is what I came up with. It moves the correct number of months and years but ignores days (which was what I needed in my situation).

import datetime

month_dt = 4
today = datetime.date.today()
y,m = today.year, today.month
m += month_dt-1
year_dt = m//12
new_month = m%12
new_date = datetime.date(y+year_dt, new_month+1, 1)
| improve this answer | |
0

I use this function to change year and month but keep day:

def replace_month_year(date1, year2, month2):
    try:
        date2 = date1.replace(month = month2, year = year2)
    except:
        date2 = datetime.date(year2, month2 + 1, 1) - datetime.timedelta(days=1)
    return date2

You should write:

new_year = my_date.year + (my_date.month + 6) / 12
new_month = (my_date.month + 6) % 12
new_date = replace_month_year(my_date, new_year, new_month)
| improve this answer | |
0

I think it would be safer to do something like this instead of manually adding days:

import datetime
today = datetime.date.today()

def addMonths(dt, months = 0):
    new_month = months + dt.month
    year_inc = 0
    if new_month>12:
        year_inc +=1
        new_month -=12
    return dt.replace(month = new_month, year = dt.year+year_inc)

newdate = addMonths(today, 6)
| improve this answer | |

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.