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How is it possible to use directly a List returned by a method when it is an Interface, the return type of the method is indeed a Boolean List, and I can use it, I thought that the interfaces could not be used directly and that they had to be implemented using a non-abstract class, that's what I see everywhere in fact.

Example :

List<Boolean> booleanList = getBooleanList();
booleanList.get(0);

Sorry for this question, I had not understood the concept, vote for deletion and I will delete it.

marked as duplicate by Kevin Cruijssen, Lino, GhostCat java Feb 11 at 14:19

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  • 1
    Please provide some sample code. – Arnaud Feb 11 at 14:10
  • Well, this method then returns an arbitrary instance of an object which implements the interface List. Might be an ArrayList or a LinkedList, maybe something else. – deHaar Feb 11 at 14:12
  • 1
    You aren't using something that is a List: you're using an instance of a concrete type which implements List. – Andy Turner Feb 11 at 14:12
  • You can not instantiate a List, but any instance of a subtype of List is still a List. – tobias_k Feb 11 at 14:12
  • 3
3

You're not using an object of type List, you're using a reference of type List. The object itself will be a concrete implementation anyway.

public List<String> getNames() {
    final List<String> names = new ArrayList<>();
    names.add("x");
    names.add("y");
    return names;
}

public void process() {
    // In fact, there is an ArraysList
    final List<String> names = getNames();
}

Some IDEs can even show you the actual object type:

enter image description here

You can use List reference type as consumer until API returns the List type, but you need to understand that there is a point somewhere when an implementation should be provided.

In fact, this is a feasible example as well:

public List<String> getNames() {
    final List<String> names = new ArrayList<>();
    names.add("x");
    names.add("y");
    return names;
}

public void process() {
    // In fact, there is an ArraysList
    final Iterable<String> names = getNames();
}

As you can see that even top-level interfaces can be used as a reference type, because both List and ArrayList are Iterable.

3

Well, when you use an object of type List, you are actually using an implementation. Which implementation? Don't know, don't care, but you are not using a List object, you are using an object that implements the List interface.

  • Okay, that makes more sense, thank you, but how do I know which type is implementing the List class? – Tao Feytout Feb 11 at 14:18
  • 1
    @TaoFeytout in general: you don't, that is the whole point. – luk2302 Feb 11 at 14:20
  • The very point of using an interface is that you don't need to know which type it actually is. – kjerins Feb 11 at 14:20
  • @GhostCat Can be handy when using marker interfaces, such as RandomAccess though I've just said it, they're still interfaces, so the implementation is still a not used detail :) – Lino Feb 11 at 14:22
  • 1
    @Lino When the actual type really matters, then your code should say so and for example return RandomAccessList instead of List ;-) – GhostCat Feb 11 at 14:23

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