49

As far as I understood I can use refs for a single element like this:

const { useRef, useState, useEffect } = React;

const App = () => {
  const elRef = useRef();
  const [elWidth, setElWidth] = useState();

  useEffect(() => {
    setElWidth(elRef.current.offsetWidth);
  }, []);

  return (
    <div>
      <div ref={elRef} style={{ width: "100px" }}>
        Width is: {elWidth}
      </div>
    </div>
  );
};

ReactDOM.render(
  <App />,
  document.getElementById("root")
);
<script src="https://unpkg.com/react@16/umd/react.production.min.js"></script>
<script src="https://unpkg.com/react-dom@16/umd/react-dom.production.min.js"></script>

<div id="root"></div>

How can I implement this for an array of elements? Obviously not like that: (I knew it even I did not try it:)

const { useRef, useState, useEffect } = React;

const App = () => {
  const elRef = useRef();
  const [elWidth, setElWidth] = useState();

  useEffect(() => {
    setElWidth(elRef.current.offsetWidth);
  }, []);

  return (
    <div>
      {[1, 2, 3].map(el => (
        <div ref={elRef} style={{ width: `${el * 100}px` }}>
          Width is: {elWidth}
        </div>
      ))}
    </div>
  );
};

ReactDOM.render(
  <App />,
  document.getElementById("root")
);
<script src="https://unpkg.com/react@16/umd/react.production.min.js"></script>
<script src="https://unpkg.com/react-dom@16/umd/react-dom.production.min.js"></script>

<div id="root"></div>

I have seen this and hence this. But, I'm still confused about how to implement that suggestion for this simple case.

  • Forgive me if this is ignorant, but if you’re only calling useRef() once, why do you expect the elements to have different refs? AFAIK, React uses the ref as an identifier for iterated elements, so it doesn’t know the difference between them when you use the same ref – MTCoster Feb 11 '19 at 15:21
  • 1
    No ignorance here since I'm still learning hooks and refs. So any advice is good advice for me. This is what I want to do, dynamically create different refs for different elements. My second example is just "Do not use this" example :) – devserkan Feb 11 '19 at 15:26
  • Where did [1,2,3] come from? Is it static? The answer depends on it. – Estus Flask Feb 11 '19 at 15:29
  • Eventually, they will come from a remote endpoint. But for now, if I learn the static one I will be glad. If you can explain for the remote situation that would be awesome. Thanks. – devserkan Feb 11 '19 at 15:31
37

A ref is initially just { current: null } object. useRef keeps the reference to this object between component renders. current value is primarily intended for component refs but can hold anything.

There should be an array of refs at some point. In case array length may vary between renders, an array should scale accordingly:

  const arrLength = arr.length;
  const [elRefs, setElRefs] = React.useState([]);

  React.useEffect(() => {
    // add or remove refs
    setElRefs(elRefs => (
      Array(arrLength).fill().map((_, i) => elRefs[i] || createRef())
    ));
  }, [arrLength]);

  return (
    <div>
      {arr.map((el, i) => (
        <div ref={elRefs[i]} style={...}>...</div>
      ))}
    </div>
  );

This piece of code can be optimized by unwrapping useEffect and replacing useState with useRef but it should be noted that doing side effects in render function is generally considered a bad practice:

  const arrLength = arr.length;
  const elRefs = React.useRef([]);

  if (elRefs.current.length !== arrLength) {
    // add or remove refs
    elRefs.current = Array(arrLength).fill().map((_, i) => elRefs.current[i] || createRef())
    ));
  }

  return (
    <div>
      {arr.map((el, i) => (
        <div ref={elRefs.current[i]} style={...}>...</div>
      ))}
    </div>
  );
| improve this answer | |
  • 1
    Thank you for your answer @estus. This clearly shows how I can create refs. Can you provide a way how can I use these refs with "state" if possible, please? Since at this state I can't use any of refs if I'm not wrong. They are not created before the first render and somehow I need to use useEffect and state I guess. Let's say, I want to get those elements' widths using refs as l did in my first example. – devserkan Feb 11 '19 at 18:12
  • I'm not sure if I understood you correctly. But a state likely needs to be an array as well, something like setElWidth(elRef.current.map(innerElRef => innerElRef.current.offsetWidth)] – Estus Flask Feb 11 '19 at 18:23
  • 2
    it only works if the array is always of the same length, if the length varies, your solution will not work. – Olivier Boissé May 9 '19 at 15:31
  • 1
    @OlivierBoissé In the code above this would happen inside .map((el, i) => .... – Estus Flask May 9 '19 at 15:49
  • 1
    @Greg The upside is to not have side effects in render function, which is considered a bad practice that is acceptable but shouldn't be recommended as a rule of thumb. If I did it the opposite way for the sake of preliminary optimization, it would be a reason to criticize the answer, too. I cannot think of a case that would make in-place side effect a really bad choice here but this doesn't mean it doesn't exist. I'll just leave all the options. – Estus Flask Feb 20 at 10:29
63

As you cannot use hooks inside loops, here is a solution in order to make it work when the array changes over the time.

I suppose the array comes from the props :

const App = props => {
    const itemsRef = useRef([]);
    // you can access the elements with itemsRef.current[n]

    useEffect(() => {
       itemsRef.current = itemsRef.current.slice(0, props.items.length);
    }, [props.items]);

    return props.items.map((item, i) => (
      <div 
          key={i} 
          ref={el => itemsRef.current[i] = el} 
          style={{ width: `${(i + 1) * 100}px` }}>
        ...
      </div>
    ));
}
| improve this answer | |
  • 3
    Excellent! An extra note, in TypeScript the signature of itemsRef appears to be: const itemsRef = useRef<Array<HTMLDivElement | null>>([]) – Mike Niebling Aug 30 '19 at 21:57
  • 1
    you can get the same result in a class component by creating an instance variable in the constructor with this.itemsRef = []. Then you need to move the useEffect code inside the componentDidUpdate lifecycle method. Finally in the render method you should use <div key={i} ref={el => this.itemsRef.current[i] = el} ` to store the refs – Olivier Boissé Nov 13 '19 at 16:17
  • 1
    This is not wokring for me. – Vinay Prajapati Dec 3 '19 at 10:08
  • 1
    How does this work if the array expected may be bigger? – madav Dec 23 '19 at 11:18
  • 1
    This has helped me massively, thank you – js-learner Jul 16 at 9:18
3

Note that you shouldn't use useRef in a loop for a simple reason: the order of used hooks does matter!

The documentation says

Don’t call Hooks inside loops, conditions, or nested functions. Instead, always use Hooks at the top level of your React function. By following this rule, you ensure that Hooks are called in the same order each time a component renders. That’s what allows React to correctly preserve the state of Hooks between multiple useState and useEffect calls. (If you’re curious, we’ll explain this in depth below.)

But consider that it obviously applies to dynamic arrays... but if you're using static arrays (you ALWAYS render the same amount of components) don't worry too much about that, be aware of what you're doing and leverage it 😉

| improve this answer | |
3

There are two ways

  1. use an Array of ref
const inputRef = list.map(x => useRef(null));

inputRef[idx].current.focus();

<input
  ref={inputRef[idx]}
/>

const {useRef} = React;
const App = () => {
const list = [...Array(8).keys()];
const inputRef = list.map(x => useRef(null));
const handler = idx => () => {
  const next = inputRef[idx + 1];
  if (next) {
    next.current.focus();
  }
};
return (
  <div className="App">
    <div className="input_boxes">
      {list.map(x => (
      <div>
        <input
          key={x}
          ref={inputRef[x]}
          onChange={handler(x)}
          type="number"
          className="otp_box"
        />
      </div>
      ))}
    </div>
  </div>
);
}
ReactDOM.render(<App />, document.getElementById("root"));
<div id="root"></div>
<script src="https://cdnjs.cloudflare.com/ajax/libs/react/16.12.0/umd/react.production.min.js"></script>
<script src="https://cdnjs.cloudflare.com/ajax/libs/react-dom/16.12.0/umd/react-dom.production.min.js"></script>

  1. use one ref with multiple current elements
const inputRef = useRef([]);

inputRef.current[idx].focus();

<input
  ref={el => inputRef.current[idx] = el}
/>

const {useRef} = React;
const App = () => {
const list = [...Array(8).keys()];
const inputRef = useRef([]);
const handler = idx => e => {
  const next = inputRef.current[idx + 1];
  if (next) {
    next.focus()
  }
};
return (
  <div className="App">
    <div className="input_boxes">
      {list.map(x => (
      <div>
        <input
          key={x}
          ref={el => inputRef.current[x] = el} 
          onChange={handler(x)}
          type="number"
          className="otp_box"
        />
      </div>
      ))}
    </div>
  </div>
);
}
ReactDOM.render(<App />, document.getElementById("root"));
<div id="root"></div>
<script src="https://cdnjs.cloudflare.com/ajax/libs/react/16.12.0/umd/react.production.min.js"></script>
<script src="https://cdnjs.cloudflare.com/ajax/libs/react-dom/16.12.0/umd/react-dom.production.min.js"></script>

| improve this answer | |
  • option two is what worked for me trying to use showCallout() on react-native-maps Markers – 7ahid Jul 6 at 1:25
2

Assuming that your array contains non primitives, you could use a WeakMap as the value of the Ref.

function MyComp(props) {
    const itemsRef = React.useRef(new WeakMap())

    // access an item's ref using itemsRef.get(someItem)

    render (
        <ul>
            {props.items.map(item => (
                <li ref={el => itemsRef.current.set(item, el)}>
                    {item.label}
                </li>
            )}
        </ul>
    )
}
| improve this answer | |
  • Actually, in my real case, my array contains non-primitives but I had to loop over the array. I think it is not possible with WeakMap, but it is a good option indeed if no iteration is needed. Thanks. PS: Ah, there is a proposal for that and it is now Stage 3. Good to know :) – devserkan Jun 10 at 11:52
1

You can use an array(or an object) to keep track of all the refs and use a method to add ref to the array.

NOTE: If you are adding and removing refs you would have to empty the array every render cycle.

import React, { useRef } from "react";

const MyComponent = () => {
   // intialize as en empty array
   const refs = useRefs([]); // or an {}
   // Make it empty at every render cycle as we will get the full list of it at the end of the render cycle
   refs.current = []; // or an {}

   // since it is an array we need to method to add the refs
   const addToRefs = el => {
     if (el && !refs.current.includes(el)) {
       refs.current.push(el);
     }
    };
    return (
     <div className="App">
       {[1,2,3,4].map(val => (
         <div key={val} ref={addToRefs}>
           {val}
         </div>
       ))}
     </div>
   );

}

working example https://codesandbox.io/s/serene-hermann-kqpsu

| improve this answer | |
  • Why, if you're already checking if el is in the array, should you empty it at every render cycle? – GWorking Mar 26 at 10:03
  • Because every render cycle it will add it to the array, we want only one copy of the el. – Neo Apr 2 at 22:09
  • Yes, but aren't you checking with !refs.current.includes(el)? – GWorking Apr 3 at 20:28
0

We can't use state because we need the ref to be available before the render method is called. We can't call useRef an arbitrary number of times, but we can call it once:

Assuming arr is a prop with the array of things:

const refs = useRef([]);
// free any refs that we're not using anymore
refs.current = refs.current.slice(0, arr.length);
// initialize any new refs
for (let step = refs.current.length; step < arr.length; step++) {
    refs.current[step] = createRef();
}
| improve this answer | |
  • References should be updated in a side effect, like useEffect(). ...avoid setting refs during rendering — this can lead to surprising behavior. Instead, typically you want to modify refs in event handlers and effects. reactjs.org/docs/… – Daniele Orlando Mar 11 at 16:41

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