4

I am trying to remove a member function based on the template type. The problem is to make a later template specialization match the type signature of my function in a case when it is not removed.

I tried the following code, which compiles with GCC (9.0.1) but gives an error in Clang (9.0.0). I think it also fails to build the code in MSVC++.

#include <type_traits>
#include <iostream>

template <typename T>
struct my_type {
    template <typename Q = T>
    std::enable_if_t<!std::is_same<bool, Q>::value, my_type<T>> my_fun(const my_type<T>& v) {
        std::cout << "Base";
        return v;
    }
};

template <>
template <typename Q> 
std::enable_if_t<!std::is_same<bool, double>::value, my_type<double>> my_type<double>::my_fun(const my_type<double>& v) {
    std::cout << "Specialized";
    return v;
}


int main()
{
    my_type<double> aa, bb;
    aa.my_fun(bb);
}

The error with Clang is

prog.cc:16:88: error: out-of-line definition of 'my_fun' does not match any declaration in 'my_type<double>'
std::enable_if_t<!std::is_same<bool, double>::value, my_type<double>> my_type<double>::my_fun(const my_type<double>& v) {
                                                                                       ^~~~~~
1 error generated.

I would like to know how to make the code work, and also why the results are not consistent cross all the major compilers.

  • What is the error? – interjay Feb 11 at 15:28
  • @interjay I've added the error to the description – DDaniel Feb 11 at 15:31
  • 1
    The infamous issue... I saw it happening from time to time :( – Matthieu Brucher Feb 11 at 15:32
  • Off-topic: std::is_same<bool, double>::value would evaluate to false anyway, so there's actually no need for having the std::enable_if around any more... – Aconcagua Feb 11 at 15:35
  • 2
    template <> template <> std::enable_if_t<!std::is_same<bool, double>::value, my_type<double>> ... will make it compile on clang and gcc. Still fails with MSVS. – NathanOliver Feb 11 at 15:54
3

In both cases: my_type is specialised to double. Then compare non-specialised version of my_fun

template < >
template <typename Q> 
std::enable_if_t<!std::is_same_v<bool, Q>::value, my_type<double>>
//                                     ^ (!)
my_type<double>::my_fun(const my_type<double>& v)

against the fully specialised my_fun:

template < >
template < >
//        ^
std::enable_if_t<!std::is_same<bool, double>::value, my_type<double>>
my_type<double>::my_fun<double>(const my_type<double>& v)
//                        ^

Both of above variants would be legal; you, in contrast, ended up somewhere in between...

GCC accepting this code doesn't look right to me, I join the 'this is a bug' fraction in the comments.

Perhaps even worse: Consider my_type<double>::my_fun<bool> specialisation – it should still exist, shouldn't it?

  • Reg. your last comment. The reason I need to make my_fun into a function template is because you will otherwise get compiler errors when creating an object of type my_type<bool> (it will complain about enable_if<**false**, ...> not having a type named "type"). But if you make it into a template function this error will go away. (I guess SFINAE?) – DDaniel Feb 11 at 16:42
  • @DDaniel Indeed, you're right... – Aconcagua Feb 11 at 16:48
  • @DDaniel Maybe good idea to prevent 'cross-instantiations' by adding a second check: && std::is_same_v<Q, T>... – Aconcagua Feb 11 at 16:50
2

I don't know how to make this work with specialization. But I do know how to just side-step the issue entirely:

template <typename> struct tag { };

template <typename Q = T>
std::enable_if_t<!std::is_same_v<bool, Q>, my_type<T>> my_fun(const my_type<T>& v) {
    return my_fun_impl(v, tag<Q>{});
}

with:

template <typename U>
my_type my_fun_impl(const my_type& v, tag<U>) {
    std::cout << "Base";
    return v;
}

my_type my_fun_impl(const my_type& v, tag<double>) {
    std::cout << "Specialized";
    return v;
}

If you wanted specialization to give users the ability to add specialized implementations, you could make my_fun_impl a free function instead of a member function. If the goal was just to specialize for certain types, you can make them private member functions.

1

You cannot use enable_if here to suppress a member function depending on the template parameter of the class, i.e. T (but only depending on the template parameter of the function, i.e. Q.

Your code is wrong, as clang rightly points out. I don't know why gcc accepts it and how it can detect what Q is in your 'specialisation' (I reckon your code compiled with gcc stated "Base" -- correct? Also as there is no inheritance, it's not clear why you use "Base".)

W/o tag type, you could do the following.

template <typename T>
struct my_type {
  private:
    template<bool Standard>
    std::enable_if_t<Base, my_type> my_fun_impl(const my_type& v)
    {
        std::cout << "Standard";
        return v;
    }
    template<bool Standard>
    std::enable_if_t<!Standard, my_type> my_fun_impl(const my_type& v)
    {
        std::cout << "Specialised";
        return v;
    }
  public:
    my_type my_fun(const my_type& v)
    {
        return my_fun_impl<is_standard<T>::value>(v);
    }
};

for whatever is_standard<> you want.

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