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[UPDATE: 2/20/19] I figured out a pretty trivial solution to solve this problem.

CREATE TRIGGER TriggerClaims_History on Claims
AFTER INSERT
AS
BEGIN
    SET NOCOUNT ON
    INSERT INTO Claims_History
    SELECT name, status, claim_date
    FROM Claims
    EXCEPT SELECT name, status, claim_date FROM Claims_History
END
GO

I am standing up a SQL Server database for a project I am working on. Important info: I have 3 tables - enrollment, cancel, and claims. There are files located on a server that populate these tables every day. These files are NOT deltas (i.e. each new file placed on server every day contains data from all previous files) and because of this, I am able to simply drop all tables, create tables, and then populate tables from files each day. My question is regarding my claims table - since tables will be dropped and created each night, I need a way to keep track of all the different status changes.

I'm struggling to figure out the best way to go about this.

I was thinking of creating a claims_history table that is NOT dropped each night. Essentially I'd want my claims_history table to be populated each time an initial new record is added to the claims table. Then I'd want to scan the claims table and add a row to the claims_history table if and only if there was a change in the status column (i.e. claims.status != claims_history.status).

Day 1:

select * from claims          

id | name     | status
 1 | jane doe | received

select * from claims_history  

id | name     | status   | timestamp
 1 | jane doe | received | datetime

Day 2:

select * from claims          

id | name     | status
 1 | jane doe | processed

select * from claims_history  

id | name     | status    | timestamp
 1 | jane doe | received  | datetime
 1 | jane doe | processed | datetime

Is there a SQL script that can do this? I'd also like to automatically have the timestamp field populate in claims_history table each time a new row is added (status change). I know I could write a python script to handle something like this, but i'd like to keep it in SQL if at all possible. Thank you.

  • 2
    Doesnt look like you have previous days data in Day 2? Why you drop the tables? Anyway looks like you need a trigger. docs.microsoft.com/en-us/sql/t-sql/statements/… – Juan Carlos Oropeza Feb 11 at 15:37
  • 1
    Yes you can do this. It sounds like you might need a trigger. Also, I would avoid using the name timestamp because it is a datatype (horribly named) that has nothing to do with date or time. But it seems kind of odd to keep a history table if you drop and recreate the table every single day. – Sean Lange Feb 11 at 15:37
  • @SeanLange I probably should have clarified that those aren't my real column names - I only put datetime in there to show that is the data type I am looking for. Thank you for the suggestions. I'll go ahead and start doing some research into triggers. – Jjman88 Feb 11 at 15:48
  • @JuanCarlosOropeza I have to drop all tables and create them again every night because the files my SSIS package picks up include all rows from the inception date. Therefore a day 3 file would include all enrollments & date from day 2 & day 1, etc. This is why I must drop the tables. Originally I was not asked to keep track of status', but now it is a last minute requirement so I'm trying to determine the best way to go about this. Thank you. – Jjman88 Feb 11 at 15:50
  • Not sure what you are tracking but your process would fail an audit because you are tracking history of a claim but the data gets dropped every night. – Sean Lange Feb 11 at 15:51
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Acording to your questions you need to create a trigger after update of the column claims.status and it very simple to do that use this link to know and see how to do a simple trigger click here create asimple sql server trigger

then as if there is many problem to manipulate dateTime in a query a would suggest you to use UNIX time instead of using datetime you can use Long or bigInt UNix time store the date as a number to know the currente time simple use the query SELECT UNIX_TIMESTAMP()

0

A very common approach is to use a staging table and a production (or final) table. All your ETLs will truncate and load the staging table (volatile) and then you execute an Stored Procedure that adds only the new records to your final table. This requires that all the data you handle this way have some form of key that identifies unequivocally a row.

What happens if your files suddenly change format or are badly formatted? You will drop your table and won't be able to load it back until you fix your ETL. This approach will save you from that, since the process will fail while loading the staging table and won't impact the final table. You can also keep deleted records for historic reasons instead of having them deleted.

I prefer to separate the staging tables into their proper schema, for example:

CREATE SCHEMA Staging
GO

CREATE TABLE Staging.Claims (
    ID INT,
    Name VARCHAR(100),
    Status VARCHAR(100))

Now you do all your loads from your files into these staging tables, truncating them first:

TRUNCATE TABLE Staging.Claims

BULK INSERT Staging.Claims
FROM '\\SomeFile.csv'
WITH
    --...

Once this table is loaded you execute a specific SP that adds your delta between the staging content and your final table. You can add whichever logic you want here, like doing only inserts for new records, or inserting already existing values that were updated on another table. For example:

CREATE TABLE dbo.Claims (
    ClaimAutoID INT IDENTITY PRIMARY KEY,
    ClaimID INT,
    Name VARCHAR(100),
    Status VARCHAR(100),
    WasDeleted BIT DEFAULT 0,
    ModifiedDate DATETIME,
    CreatedDate DATETIME DEFAULT GETDATE())
GO

CREATE PROCEDURE Staging.UpdateClaims
AS
BEGIN

    BEGIN TRY

        BEGIN TRANSACTION

            -- Update changed values
            UPDATE C SET
                Name = S.Name,
                Status = S.Status,
                ModifiedDate = GETDATE()
            FROM
                Staging.Claims AS S
                INNER JOIN dbo.Claims AS C ON S.ID = C.ClaimID -- This has to be by the key columns
            WHERE
                ISNULL(C.Name, '') <> ISNULL(S.Name, '') AND
                ISNULL(C.Status, '') <> ISNULL(S.Status, '')

            -- Insert new records
            INSERT INTO dbo.Claims (
                ClaimID,
                Name,
                Status)
            SELECT
                ClaimID = S.ID,
                Name = S.Name,
                Status = S.Status
            FROM
                Staging.Claims AS S
            WHERE
                NOT EXISTS (SELECT 'not yet loaded' FROM dbo.Claims AS C WHERE S.ID = C.ClaimID) -- This has to be by the key columns

            -- Mark deleted records as deleted
            UPDATE C SET
                WasDeleted = 1,
                ModifiedDate = GETDATE()
            FROM
                dbo.Claims AS C
            WHERE
                NOT EXISTS (SELECT 'not anymore on files' FROM Staging.Claims AS S WHERE S.ClaimID = C.ClaimID) -- This has to be by the key columns


        COMMIT

    END TRY

    BEGIN CATCH

        DECLARE @v_ErrorMessage VARCHAR(MAX) = ERROR_MESSAGE()

        IF @@TRANCOUNT > 0
            ROLLBACK

        RAISERROR (@v_ErrorMessage, 16, 1)

    END CATCH

END

This way you always work with dbo.Claims and the records are never lost (just updated or inserted).


If you need to check the last status of a particular claim you can create a view:

CREATE VIEW dbo.vClaimLastStatus 
AS
WITH ClaimsOrdered AS
(
    SELECT
        C.ClaimAutoID,
        C.ClaimID,
        C.Name,
        C.Status,
        C.ModifiedDate,
        C.CreatedDate,
        DateRanking = ROW_NUMBER() OVER (PARTITION BY C.ClaimID ORDER BY C.CreatedDate DESC)
    FROM
        dbo.Claims AS C
)
SELECT
    C.ClaimAutoID,
    C.ClaimID,
    C.Name,
    C.Status,
    C.ModifiedDate,
    C.CreatedDate,
FROM
    ClaimsOrdered AS C
WHERE
    DateRanking = 1
  • This looks great. I'd have to spend some time to fully understand this approach, but from what I can see this would solve the problem. Could you talk about the performance of using this approach? Right now my SSIS package goes something like this - drop staging tables; create staging tables; import files for each table; drop production tables; create production tables; insert data from staging to production; archive files; send successful email to appropriate parties. Do you know what the performance would be, good or bad, using your approach vs the one I used? – Jjman88 Feb 11 at 16:53
  • @Jjman88 Well using this approach you will win some time by not dropping the production tables and loading them fully again. The SP will run very fast if both the staging tables and the production tables have indexes on the columns they are joining with. The amount of time you win will increase with the amount if data the files contain. Also you will be loading each file once to staging and not twice. – EzLo Feb 12 at 7:12

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