1

I have a table in a JSON format (list of dicts), where each row is a dict.

Say for simplicity that I have a row like this:

{
    'dimension1': 'foo',
    'dimension2': 'bar',
    'metric1': 102,
    'metric2': 200
}

I would like to know if there a simple way (maybe using pandas or any other python tool), to split this row into a given number of n rows where:

  1. Dimensions will be kept as is.
  2. Metrics values will be splitted evenly across all rows.
  3. All metrics are int and should be kept int.
  4. The sum should be equal to the original row.

For example, if n = 4, the output for the row above should be:

[{
    'dimension1': 'foo',
    'dimension2': 'bar',
    'metric1': 25,
    'metric2': 50
},{
    'dimension1': 'foo',
    'dimension2': 'bar',
    'metric1': 25,
    'metric2': 50
},{
    'dimension1': 'foo',
    'dimension2': 'bar',
    'metric1': 26,
    'metric2': 50
},{
    'dimension1': 'foo',
    'dimension2': 'bar',
    'metric1': 26,
    'metric2': 50
}]

I tried to search for a way of doing this with pandas or other tools, but couldn't find a way to give a set of dimensions that should be kept static and a set of metrics that should be splitted while keeping the sum.

Hope this is clear enough. I know it's possible to write this logic explicitly but wanted to know if there's any simpler, more robust way I am missing here.

1

Might not be the cleanest one but give it a go using np.histrogram to convert the values into bins

def value_to_bins(df_value,n):
    value=np.arange(df_value, dtype=int)
    return np.histogram(value, bins=n)[0]

import pandas as pd
import numpy as np
d={
    'dimension1': 'foo',
    'dimension2': 'bar',
    'metric1': 101,
    'metric2': 200
}
df=pd.DataFrame(d,index=[0])
n=2

df2=pd.DataFrame(index=range(n),columns=['dimension1','dimension2']) # create new dataframe with NaN
df2.dimension1=df2.dimension1.fillna(df.dimension1[0]) # fill with values of previous dimension1
df2.dimension2=df2.dimension2.fillna(df.dimension2[0]) # fill with values of previous dimension2

df2['metric1'] = value_to_bins(df.metric1[0],n)
df2['metric2'] = value_to_bins(df.metric2[0],n)
df2.to_dict('records')

Output

[{'dimension1': 'foo', 'dimension2': 'bar', 'metric1': 50L, 'metric2': 100L},
 {'dimension1': 'foo', 'dimension2': 'bar', 'metric1': 51L, 'metric2': 100L}]

To keep the int values

[{k:int(v) if v!=np.nan and k in ['metric1','metric2']  else v for k,v in i.items() } for i in df2.to_dict('records')]

Output

[{'dimension1': 'foo', 'dimension2': 'bar', 'metric1': 50, 'metric2': 100},
 {'dimension1': 'foo', 'dimension2': 'bar', 'metric1': 51, 'metric2': 100}]
  • Thanks for this solution. I agree that it's doesn't look so clean but it's the cleaner than what I could think of. I have taken your idea and made it a bit more generic. Would be nicer to loop over the dimensions and metrics instead of explicitly writing them down. :) – A. Sarid Feb 12 at 16:53
0

You can use floor and list comprehension and dictionary comprehension : idea is calculation floor then divide and share reminder by 1 for each element to have close element as much as possible, for example assuming 102 and n=4 we have reminder=2, so result is : 25+1,25+1,25,25

import math

data={
'dimension1': 'foo',
'dimension2': 'bar',
'metric1': 102,
'metric2': 203
}
#finds all keys with integer values
division_fields=[k for k,v in data.items() if str(v).isdigit()]
values={}
n=4
#creates a list with desired  values for each numeric field
#and diveds reminder betweens elements of list by 1 foreach element 
for  field in division_fields:
    values[field]= [math.floor(data[field]/n) if i+1>data[field]%n else math.floor(data[field]/n)+1 for i in range(0,n)]

result=[{k:values[k][i] if k in division_fields else v for k,v in data.items() } for i in range(0,n)]

print (result)

Output(for n=4):

[{'dimension1': 'foo', 'dimension2': 'bar', 'metric1': 26, 'metric2': 51},
 {'dimension1': 'foo', 'dimension2': 'bar', 'metric1': 26, 'metric2': 51},
 {'dimension1': 'foo', 'dimension2': 'bar', 'metric1': 25, 'metric2': 51},
 {'dimension1': 'foo', 'dimension2': 'bar', 'metric1': 25, 'metric2': 50}]
  • The value for metric2 should not remain as 200 it should be 50 as per the value you opted – mad_ Feb 11 at 17:00
  • right, thanks for pointing out. – Mehrdad Dowlatabadi Feb 11 at 17:22
  • @MehrdadDowlatabadi What will happen if metric1 is 102? If I understand your solution correctly, the last element will have now 27. I want it to be evenly (as much as possible), meaning that two rows will be 26 and two 25. I'll also update my question accordingly. – A. Sarid Feb 12 at 9:24
  • I have edited my answer hope it is what you need. – Mehrdad Dowlatabadi Feb 12 at 10:09

Your Answer

By clicking "Post Your Answer", you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.