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I am running R on macOS and R can see 4 cores and 8 hyperthreaded units:

> library(parallel)
> detectCores(logical=TRUE)
[1] 8
> detectCores(logical=FALSE)
[1] 4

The following script has a function that sleeps for 0.1 seconds, calls it 10 times, and parallelises those calls on a number of cores ranging from 1 to 12:

long_function <- function(x) {
  Sys.sleep(0.1)
  x
}

for (no_cores in 1:12) {

  start <- Sys.time()
  x <- mclapply(1:10, long_function, mc.cores = no_cores)
  end <- Sys.time()

  print(paste0("Parallelised over ", no_cores, " cores, time = ", end - start))
}

The results are:

[1] "Parallelised over 1 cores, time = 1.00716304779053"
[1] "Parallelised over 2 cores, time = 0.553637027740479"
[1] "Parallelised over 3 cores, time = 0.447566032409668"
[1] "Parallelised over 4 cores, time = 0.338685035705566"
[1] "Parallelised over 5 cores, time = 0.234640121459961"
[1] "Parallelised over 6 cores, time = 0.223365068435669"
[1] "Parallelised over 7 cores, time = 0.226859092712402"
[1] "Parallelised over 8 cores, time = 0.227418899536133"
[1] "Parallelised over 9 cores, time = 0.226329803466797"
[1] "Parallelised over 10 cores, time = 0.116447925567627"
[1] "Parallelised over 11 cores, time = 0.116322040557861"
[1] "Parallelised over 12 cores, time = 0.12298583984375"

The time spent decreases below the lower bound of 1/8=0.125 seconds.

The results are the same whether the jobs are prescheduled with mc.preschedule={T,F}, and similar on Ubuntu on Azure with 4 vCPUs, where the running time goes below the lower bound of 1/4=0.25 seconds.

How can this be?

  • 1
    Isn't the lower bound 1/10 because you're only iterating over 10 items? And your mclapply code seems to work with 12 cores – Mike H. Feb 11 at 17:03
  • The total processing time is 0.1 seconds of waiting time, multiplied by 10 inputs, so 1 second. It can run on at most 8 cores, so 1/8=0.125 per core. So I think the lower bound is 0.125 seconds. I also tried with running it over 5 inputs 1:5, where the lower bound according to your calculation would be 0.2 seconds, and the total time is still lower than 0.2. – mmorin Feb 11 at 17:07
  • For 1:5 wouldn't it be 0.1 as the lower bound? You have 5 processes each taking ~0.1 seconds and > 5 cores. So it should all be done at once. I think a better question is how you can use 12 cores – Mike H. Feb 11 at 17:11
  • Also, maybe someone else can weigh in but to me atleast your calculation method doesn't make sense. With 8 cores (or anything less than 10), the lower bound should be 0.2 because you have 10 items. All 8 cores are assigned to the first 8 processes (min time = 0.1). Once they are done, two cores then finish the last two processes (min time = 0.1) for a total time of 0.2. I don't think cores can "split" processes to make it faster. I.e. each of your 8 cores cannot do 1/8 of the work of a single iteration of the for loop – Mike H. Feb 11 at 17:20
  • Yes, I agree with your computation of the lower bound. I experimented with using 1:8 as inputs and I do not go below 0.1, and with 1:16 I do not go below 0.2. So I wonder if parallelisation on "12 cores" implies assigning 2 jobs to the same thread and doing high-frequency swapping between them. – mmorin Feb 11 at 17:26

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