1

I have a table (2M+ records) which keeps track of a ledger. Some entries add points, while others subtract points (there are only two kinds of entries). The entries which subtract points, always reference the (adding) entries they were subtracted from with referenceentryid. The adding entries would always have NULL in referenceentryid.

This table has a dead column which would be set to true by a worker when some additions was depleted or expired, or when the subtractions is pointing at a "dead" additions. Since the table has a partial index on dead=false, SELECT on live rows works pretty fast.

My problem is with the performance of the worker that sets dead to NULL.

The flow would be: 1. Get an entry for each addition which indicates the amount added, subtracted and whether or not it's expired. 2. Filter away entries which are both not expired and have more addition than subtraction. 3. Update dead=true on every row where either the id or the referenceentryid is in the filtered set of entries.

WITH entries AS 
(
    SELECT 
        additions.id AS id,
        SUM(subtractions.amount) AS subtraction,
        additions.amount AS addition,
        additions.expirydate <= now() AS expired
    FROM 
        loyalty_ledger AS subtractions
    INNER JOIN 
        loyalty_ledger AS additions
    ON 
        additions.id = subtractions.referenceentryid
    WHERE
        subtractions.dead = FALSE
        AND subtractions.referenceentryid IS NOT NULL
    GROUP BY 
        subtractions.referenceentryid, additions.id
), dead_entries AS (
    SELECT
        id
    FROM
        entries
    WHERE
        subtraction >= addition OR expired = TRUE
)
-- THE SLOW BIT:
SELECT
    *
FROM 
    loyalty_ledger AS ledger
WHERE
    ledger.dead = FALSE AND
    (ledger.id IN (SELECT id FROM dead_entries) OR ledger.referenceentryid IN (SELECT id FROM dead_entries));

In the query above the inner part runs pretty fast (a few seconds) while the last part would run for ever.

I have the following indexes on the table:

CREATE TABLE IF NOT EXISTS loyalty_ledger (
        id SERIAL PRIMARY KEY,
        programid bigint NOT NULL,   
        FOREIGN KEY (programid) REFERENCES loyalty_programs(id) ON DELETE CASCADE,
        referenceentryid    bigint,
        FOREIGN KEY (referenceentryid) REFERENCES loyalty_ledger(id) ON DELETE CASCADE,
        customerprofileid bigint NOT NULL,
        FOREIGN KEY (customerprofileid) REFERENCES customer_profiles(id) ON DELETE CASCADE,
        amount int NOT NULL,
        expirydate TIMESTAMPTZ,
        dead boolean DEFAULT false,
        expired boolean DEFAULT false
);

CREATE index loyalty_ledger_referenceentryid_idx ON loyalty_ledger (referenceprofileid) WHERE dead = false;
CREATE index loyalty_ledger_customer_program_idx ON loyalty_ledger (customerprofileid, programid) WHERE dead = false;

I'm trying to optimise the last part of the query. EXPLAIN gives me the following:

"Index Scan using loyalty_ledger_referenceentryid_idx on loyalty_ledger ledger  (cost=103412.24..4976040812.22 rows=986583 width=67)"
"  Filter: ((SubPlan 3) OR (SubPlan 4))"
"  CTE entries"
"    ->  GroupAggregate  (cost=1.47..97737.83 rows=252177 width=25)"
"          Group Key: subtractions.referenceentryid, additions.id"
"          ->  Merge Join  (cost=1.47..91390.72 rows=341928 width=28)"
"                Merge Cond: (subtractions.referenceentryid = additions.id)"
"                ->  Index Scan using loyalty_ledger_referenceentryid_idx on loyalty_ledger subtractions  (cost=0.43..22392.56 rows=341928 width=12)"
"                      Index Cond: (referenceentryid IS NOT NULL)"
"                ->  Index Scan using loyalty_ledger_pkey on loyalty_ledger additions  (cost=0.43..80251.72 rows=1683086 width=16)"
"  CTE dead_entries"
"    ->  CTE Scan on entries  (cost=0.00..5673.98 rows=168118 width=4)"
"          Filter: ((subtraction >= addition) OR expired)"
"  SubPlan 3"
"    ->  CTE Scan on dead_entries  (cost=0.00..3362.36 rows=168118 width=4)"
"  SubPlan 4"
"    ->  CTE Scan on dead_entries dead_entries_1  (cost=0.00..3362.36 rows=168118 width=4)"

Seems like the last part of my query is very inefficient. Any ideas on how to speed it up?

1

For large datasets, I have found semi-joins to have much better performance than query in-lists:

from
  loyalty_ledger as ledger
WHERE
    ledger.dead = FALSE AND (
    exists (
      select null
      from dead_entries d
      where d.id = ledger.id
      ) or
    exists (
      select null
      from dead_entries d
      where d.id = ledger.referenceentryid
      )
    )

I honestly don't know, but I think each of these would also be worth a try. It's less code and more intuitive, but there is no guarantee they will work better:

ledger.dead = FALSE AND
exists (
  select null
  from dead_entries d
  where d.id = ledger.id or d.id = ledger.referenceentryid 
)

or

ledger.dead = FALSE AND
exists (
  select null
  from dead_entries d
  where d.id in (ledger.id, ledger.referenceentryid) 
)
0

What helped me in the end was to do the id IN filtering part in the second WITH step, replacing IN with ANY syntax:

   WITH entries AS 
        (
            SELECT 
                additions.id AS id,
                additions.amount - coalesce(SUM(subtractions.amount),0) AS balance,
                additions.expirydate <= now() AS passed_expiration
            FROM 
                loyalty_ledger AS additions
            LEFT JOIN 
                loyalty_ledger AS subtractions
            ON 
                subtractions.dead = FALSE AND
                additions.id = subtractions.referenceentryid
            WHERE
                additions.dead = FALSE AND additions.referenceentryid IS NULL
            GROUP BY 
                subtractions.referenceentryid, additions.id
        ), dead_rows AS (
            SELECT
                l.id AS id,
                -- only additions that still have usable points can expire
                l.referenceentryid IS NULL AND e.balance > 0 AND e.passed_expiration AS expired
            FROM
                loyalty_ledger AS l
            INNER JOIN
                entries AS e
            ON
                (l.id = e.id OR l.referenceentryid = e.id)
            WHERE
                l.dead = FALSE AND
                (e.balance <= 0 OR e.passed_expiration)
           ORDER BY e.balance DESC
        )
        UPDATE
            loyalty_ledger AS l
        SET 
            (dead, expired) = (TRUE, d.expired)
        FROM 
            dead_rows AS d
        WHERE
            l.id = d.id AND
            l.dead = FALSE;
0

I also believe

-- THE SLOW BIT:
SELECT
    *
FROM 
    loyalty_ledger AS ledger
WHERE
    ledger.dead = FALSE AND
    (ledger.id IN (SELECT id FROM dead_entries) OR ledger.referenceentryid IN (SELECT id FROM dead_entries));

Can be rewritten into a JOIN and UNION ALL which most likely also will generate a other execution plan and might be faster.
But hard to verify for sure without the other table structures.

SELECT
    *
FROM 
    loyalty_ledger AS ledger
INNER JOIN (SELECT id FROM dead_entries) AS dead_entries
ON ledger.id = dead_entries.id AND ledger.dead = FALSE

UNION ALL 

SELECT
    *
FROM 
    loyalty_ledger AS ledger
INNER JOIN (SELECT id FROM dead_entries) AS dead_entries
ON ledger.referenceentryid = dead_entries.id AND ledger.dead = FALSE

And because CTE's in PostgreSQL are materialized and not indexed. Your are most likely better off removing the dead_entries alias from the CTE and repeat outside the CTE.

 SELECT
    *
FROM 
    loyalty_ledger AS ledger
INNER JOIN (SELECT
    id
FROM
    entries
WHERE
    subtraction >= addition OR expired = TRUE) AS dead_entries
ON ledger.id = dead_entries.id AND ledger.dead = FALSE

UNION ALL 

SELECT
    *
FROM 
    loyalty_ledger AS ledger
INNER JOIN (SELECT
    id
FROM
    entries
WHERE
    subtraction >= addition OR expired = TRUE) AS dead_entries
ON ledger.referenceentryid = dead_entries.id AND ledger.dead = FALSE

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