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I'm trying to get the percentage weight of the Mcap of a stock in relation to the sum of the Mcap of the Index.

In the example there are only seven stocks included. I know that the SQL statement is wrong an I'm missing something conceptual about this. My results are twisted and I tried to write the SQL statement differently but not successful.

Maybe I've to mention, but not sure, that I'm using a SQLite database here. So please if you can help me, be so kind and explain also what is missing from the conceptual side.

def mcap_weight():
    '''Gets the weight of the stock in relation to the Dow Jones Index
    based on Mcap
    - Weight is in percent'''
    path = str(curr_path) + '/DowJonesInvestments.db'
    connection = sqlite3.connect(path)
    cursor = connection.cursor()
    cursor.execute("""
                    SELECT MemberId, Ticker, MemberName,
                    (SELECT COUNT(Mcap/1000000000.0)/(Sum(Mcap/1000000000.0)))*100
                    FROM MarketData
                    LEFT JOIN DowMembers
                    ON MarketData.MarketDataId = DowMembers.MemberId
                    GROUP BY MemberId
                    ORDER by (MemberId);""")
    results = cursor.fetchall()
    cursor.close()
    connection.close()
    return results    

Script result:

[(1, 'MMM',  '3M',               0.8889056834224927),
 (2, 'AXP',  'American Express', 1.1358444855147836),
 (3, 'AAPL', 'Apple',            0.12735796496692525),
 (4, 'BA',   'Boeing',           0.4545127533610421),
 (5, 'CAT',  'Caterpillar',      1.2944838109829184),
 (6, 'CVX',  'Chevron',          0.4421289423517639),
 (7, 'CSCO', 'Cisco',            0.46983908340252634)]

Correct result from xls:

ID Ticker  Mcap             Percentage
1  MMM     114,830,710,459  6.66 
2  AXP     88,040,221,417   5.11
3  AAPL.O  785,188,425,600  45.54
4  BA      220,015,828,512  12.76
5  CAT     77,250,869,537   4.48
6  CVX     226,178,362,059  13.12
7  CSCO.O  212,838,828,298  12.34

Total  1,724,343,245,88

Table schema:

    **Name            Data type  Primary Key    Default value**
 1.   MarkedDataId    Integer    Yes            Null
 2.   Price           Real                      Null
 3.   Mcap            Real                      Null
 4.   Dividend        Real                      Null
 5.   Date            Date                      Null 

Market Data table:

    **MarketDataId     Price      Mcap            Dividend         Date**
 1. 1                  199.09     112497874482    5.411            2019-01-29

 2. 2                  103.06     88040221417     1.61             2019-01-29
 3. 3                  166.52     785188425600    3.07186          2019-01-29
 4. 4                  387.43     220015828512    7.96029          2019-01-29

 5. 5                  130.91     77250869537     3.42824          2019-01-29


 6. 6                  118.37     226178362059    4.67556          2019-01-29

 7. 7                  47.34      212838828298    1.38477          2019-01-29
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    Show the rows from your tables used to get those results. The table definitions too. – Shawn Feb 11 at 18:23
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    Your question is only about SQLite3. Python is irrelevant as Python does not do any processing of the data that could possibly affect the correctness of the results. – tonypdmtr Feb 11 at 22:06
  • @shawn I've included the table schema and also the figures from the MarketData table. Also thanks for the reformatting help – pygalaxy Feb 12 at 10:44
  • @ArtOfWarfare thanks for the reformatting – pygalaxy Feb 12 at 10:48
  • @Xero Smith thanks for the reformatting – pygalaxy Feb 12 at 10:48
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I believe your mistake is this:

COUNT(Mcap/1000000000.0)

What is that supposed to accomplish? Testing with an Oracle database (possibly behaves different from sqllite) it returns the same thing as Count(Mcap), which I also don't think is the right thing. I think for your fourth column, you actually want this:

Mcap/(Select Sum(Mcap) from MarketData)*100
  • Thank you @ArtofWarfare this was it. Works perfect and you improved my understanding of nested queries. – pygalaxy Feb 12 at 18:51

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