3

I have read in multiple places that when declaring an extern variable, the memory is not designated until the definition is made. I was trying this code which is giving contradictory output in gcc.

#include <stdio.h>

int main() {
    extern int a;
    printf("%lu", sizeof(a));
    return 0;
}

it should have shown error or zero size. but the output was following. please justify the output. Is it example of another undefined behavior?

aditya@theMonster:~$ ./a
4
2
  • 10
    You're just outputting the size of a type. That's perfectly valid. Are you sure you understand what sizeof does? Feb 11, 2019 at 18:49
  • @AdityaGaddhyan: you can accept one of the answers by clicking on the grey checkmark below its score and upvote those that helped you.
    – chqrlie
    Mar 8, 2019 at 7:14

5 Answers 5

3

You're able to get away with it here because a is never actually used. The expression sizeof(a) is evaluated at compile time. So because a is never referenced, the linker doesn't bother looking for it.

Had you done this instead:

printf("%d\n", a);

Then the program would have failed to link, printing "undefined reference to `a'"

2

The size of a variable is the size of its data type, whether it is presently only an extern or not. Since sizeof is evaluated at compile time, whereas symbol resolution is done at link time, this is acceptable.

Even with -O0, gcc doesn't care that it's extern; it puts 4 in esi for the argument to printf: https://godbolt.org/z/Zv2VYd

Without declaring a, however, any of the following will fail:

a = 3;
printf("%d\n", a);
int *p = &a;
2

The a is an integer, so its size is 4.

Its location(address) and value are not currently known.
(it is extern somewhere at some other location)

But the size is well defined.

1

size_t sizeof(expr/var_name/data_type) 1 is a unary operator which when not provided with a variable length array, do not evaluate the expression. It just check the data type of expression.

Similarly, here, in sizeof(a), the complier only checks the data type of a which is int and hence returns the size of int.

Another example to clear your confusion is in sizeof(i++), i do not get incremented. Its data type is checked and returned.

One more example:

void main(){
   int p=0;
   printf("%zu",sizeof(p=2+3.0));
   printf("%d",p);
}

will give u output on gcc as:

4
0
0

There is indeed a problem in your code, but not where you expect it:

  • passing a value of type size_t for printf conversion specification %ld has undefined behavior if size_t and unsigned long have different sizes or representations, as is the case on many systems (16-bit systems, Windows 64-bit...).

Here is a corrected version, portable to non C99-conforming systems, whose C library printf might not support %zu:

#include <stdio.h>

int main(void) {
    extern int a;
    printf("%lu\n", (unsigned long)sizeof(a));
    return 0;
}

Regarding why the program compiles and executes without an error:

  • Variable a is declared inside the body of main with extern linkage: no space is allocated for it and a would be undefined outside the body of main.
  • sizeof(a) is evaluated at compile time as the constant value sizeof(int), which happens to be 4 on your platform.
  • No further reference to a is generated by the compiler, so the linker does not complain about a not being defined anywhere.

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