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How can I create private labels in assembly functions that can only be used from within the defining function, but cannot be used from other functions as e.g. jump targets?

In the below example, I don't want .private_label to be reachable from _main. However, it compiles just fine using clang -S -masm=intel example.s -o example.

I've previously seen this feature in NASM, but now I've decided to switch to Clang.

Bonus: Where can I look this information up myself? I've already did some research myself.

.intel_syntax noprefix
.globl _main

.text

_f:
push rbp 
mov rbp, rsp
.private_label:
mov rsp, rbp
pop rbp
ret

_main:
push rbp 
mov rbp, rsp
jmp .private_label
mov rax, 0x5
mov rsp, rbp
pop rbp
ret 
3

Labels that are not marked .global are inaccessible from other modules. Labels that begin with .L are additionally not entered into the symbol table.

There is no way to make a label inaccessible from the same module, but you can get a similar effect with numbered labels. The 10 labels 0 to 9 can only be accessed with the syntax 0b for “the previous label 0” and 0f for “the next label 0.” If you surround your label with two labels of the same number, it is not possible to refer to it from the outside. For example:

# the label is inaccessible here
0:

# the label is accessible here using 0f
    jmp 0f

# our label
0:  ud2

# the label is accessible here using 0b

0:

# the label is inaccessible here

Note that nothing prevents somebody else from just guessing the address your label ends up being assigned and jumping there. I am not sure what you want to achieve.

For further documentation, refer to the GNU assembler manual. The assembler shipped with the LLVM distribution supports a subset of this functionality. Note that if you are programming on macOS as it seems, the assembler being used might be the macOS assembler. Refer the man page as(1) for details on this tool.

  • thanks for your answer. What I want to achieve, is that I don't accidentally jump to labels defined in another function by mistake (typo). By module, do you mean a source code (assembly) file? Aren't there any assembly reference manual for Intel style assembly accepted by the LLVM assembler? – Shuzheng 2 days ago
  • @Shuzheng Yes, “module” refers to one source file. As far as I am concerned, there is no documentation for the LLVM assembler. I might have missed it though. – fuz 2 days ago
  • Can you link to a good documentation e.g. GCC or MASM, that may be used as a reference for LLVM assembler, since the syntax and directives are similar? I'd be grateful! – Shuzheng 2 days ago
  • @Shuzheng I already told you to have a look at the GNU assembler manual. – fuz 2 days ago

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