12

I'm new to angular after spending the last few years on react projects.

I have a component that is using changeDetection: ChangeDetectionStrategy.OnPush and I don't like my solution. The trouble is that I am finding it tough to find any good real world examples of ChangeDetectionStrategy.OnPush

For example, I have a component a bit like this:

  files: Uploads[] = [];

  get canUpload() {
    return this.files.length > 0l
  }

  get isUploading() {
    return this.files.length > 0 && this.files.some((f) => f.state === FileUpLoadState.uploading);
  }

  get activeFiles() {
    return this.files.filter((f) => f.state !== FileUpLoadState.success);
  }

  uploadFiles() {
    if (!this.files.length) {
      return;
    }

    const fileList: FileList = (event.target as HTMLInputElement).files;

    for (const uploadedFile of Array.prototype.slice.call(fileList)) {
      // do stuff
      this.files.push(new Upload(file));
    }

  }

I have these properties that are used in the template like this;

 <button (click)="uploadFiles()" [disabled]="!this.canUpload">Upload</button>

I really don't like this, using default change detection won't scale and when changes get propagated are outside of my control.

How can I refactor this code to use OnPush change detection?

  • What have you tried? What problems have you encountered? – Jota.Toledo Feb 13 at 19:58
  • I'm refactoring to redux. No idea how it is supposed to work in angular. TBH finding angular a ghetto – dagda1 Feb 13 at 20:18
  • I have a component that is using changeDetection: ChangeDetectionStrategy.OnPush and I don't like my solution what dont you like about your current implementation? As it is, its hard to understand your question. And the fact that the implementation of uploadFiles isnt correct makes it even worst. – Jota.Toledo Feb 13 at 20:32
  • 1
    Sure, there are indeed outdated articles out there and ppl who will answer to your question without having a clear idea of what they are talking. Nevertheless, that doesnt give you an excuse to come up with a poorly written problem. I would strongly suggest you to read this article, it should give you an idea of what happens behind the scenes in angular and maybe help you reformulate your question/issue. – Jota.Toledo Feb 13 at 20:50
  • 3
    You are over exaggerating a lot of the mentioned points and going off topic. Anyhow, there are a lot of good resources out there that explain how to implement a component with OnPush cd strategy. Hopefully you will take a look and come back with a concrete issue. – Jota.Toledo Feb 13 at 22:02
3
+300

People answer you, but they don't explain you.

OnPush strategy is the most efficient strategy when it comes to change detection. Angular doesn't implement it by default, because newcomers are used to see magic (i.e. default strategy is more error-friendly and understandable when you start using Angular).

To detect changes, Angular listens to events on your view. With the default strategy, that can result in a lot of useless change detection.

In the push strategy, you control when the change detection is triggered.

In both cases, Angular uses memory references to know when your data has been updated. That's why object immutability is so important in Angular, and also why reactive programming works so well.

That being said, if you want to switch to the push strategy, you should use the following :

  // files: Uploads[] = [];
  files: BehaviorSubject<Uploads[]> = new BehaviorSubject([]);

  add(item) {
    this.files.pipe(first()).subscribe(files => this.files.next([...files, item]));
  }

  get canUpload() {
    // return this.files.length > 0l
    return this.files.pipe(
      map(files => files.length),
      map(size => !!size)
    );
  }

  get isUploading() {
    // return this.files.length > 0 && this.files.some((f) => f.state === FileUpLoadState.uploading);
    return this.files.pipe(
      startWith(false),
      filter(files => !!files.length),
      filter(files => files.some(f => f.state === FileUpLoadState.uploading)),
      map(() => true)
    );
  }

  get activeFiles() {
    // return this.files.filter((f) => f.state !== FileUpLoadState.success);
    return this.files.pipe(
      map(files => files.filter(f => f.state !== FileUpLoadState.success)),
    );
  }

  uploadFiles() {
    /*
    if (!this.files.length) {
      return;
    }

    const fileList: FileList = (event.target as HTMLInputElement).files;

    for (const uploadedFile of Array.prototype.slice.call(fileList)) {
      // do stuff
      this.files.push(new Upload(file));
    }
    */
    this.files.pipe(
      filter(files => !!files.length),
      map(files => (event.target as HTMLInputElement).files),
      first()
    ).subscribe(files => {
      for (const uploadedFile of Array.prototype.slice.call(fileList)) {
        // do stuff
        this.add(new Upload(file));
      }
    });
  }

This is one of many implementations you can do. I'm not sure this will work the way you expect, I just "translated" the code, so you might have one or two adjustements to make.

With this, your view gets updated automatically when your collection changes. You don't have to do anything. This complies with the push strategy, because the reactive programming triggers the change detection.

And because every getter depends on your BehaviorSubject, they all get updated at every change in that subject.

Just a "drawback" (which really, isn't), is that in your component template, you have to use the async pipe :

 <ng-container *ngIf="canUpload | async">...</ng-container>

if you have questions, feel free to ask them !

  • I'm using rxjs 5. There is no pipe on behaviour subject. Can you suggest an alternative. Also where is the the map function coming from – dagda1 Feb 16 at 21:29
  • it seems wrong to have these subscriptions in getters. how would you approach this problem? subscribe once in ngoninit and update a state object? – dagda1 Feb 17 at 4:09
  • @dagda1 you can use mySubject.asObservable() to get the pipe method, but it should be there by default. What version are you using ? And you don't have a single subscription in the getters, you only have observables. The subscriptions will be in your component, through the async pipe. – trichetriche Feb 18 at 7:30
  • @Milad there isn't a single subscription that isn't closed. So I don't see where you see memory leaks. Function names are objectives, I just copied the code, I don't see why you would talk about that but sure. The code is very easy to unit test, you just find it difficult because you don't know how. The code is preety simple, it's you that probably don't understand sh*t. OnPush works on memory references and reactive programming, meaning that on each change on the proxy (the subject), the changes are automatically reflected into the view. – trichetriche Feb 18 at 7:33
  • 1
    I have accepted your answer, there is nothing more I can do. I think you might have to wait a bit but I've done my bit. – dagda1 Feb 18 at 14:53
3

According the template below and using ChangeDetectionStrategy.OnPush, ChangeDetection runs only after the button click. (It implements only to DOM events). Everything else won't affect and DetectChanges() function doesn't run (for example, the fetching some data from some resource won't affect on your code)

import { ChangeDetectionStrategy } from '@angular/core';

@Component({
  selector: 'app-root',
   template: `
    <button (click)="uploadFiles()" [disabled]="!this.canUpload">Upload</button>
  `,
  changeDetection: ChangeDetectionStrategy.OnPush,
  styleUrls: ['./app.component.css']
})

export class AppComponent {
    uploadFiles() {
      .../*Here's function body*/
    }
}
0

As Dmitry S wrote in his answer, we can set the ChangeDetectionStrategy of our component to ChangeDetectionStrategy.OnPush.

This tells Angular that the component only depends on its @inputs() (aka pure), and needs to be checked only in the following cases:

  1. The Input reference changes.
  2. An event originated from the component or one of its children.
  3. We run change detection explicitly.

Netanel Basal has published a very helpful article on ChangeDetectionStrategy.OnPush.

-1

If you want full control over change detection, using the OnPush-Strategy, get a changeDetectorReference

constructor(private changeDetector: ChangeDetectorRef){}

and trigger change detection when you want to, e.g. when your array changes or in your upload-method.

uploadFiles() { 
// ...
this.changeDetector.detectChanges()
}

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