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I have a MappedMemory class that allocates a chunk of memory via Marshal.AllocHGlobal(). The class implements IDisposable, and I have it set up to auto-dispose the allocated memory when the class is finalized. However, it does not appear to be working as intended.

class MappedMemory : IDisposable
{
    private bool disposed_ = false;
    private IntPtr memoryPtr_;

    public MappedMemory( int capacity )
    {
      memoryPtr_ = Marshal.AllocHGlobal( capacity );
    }

    ~MappedMemory()
    {
      Dispose( false );
    }

    public void Dispose()
    {
      Dispose( true );
      GC.SuppressFinalize( this );
    }

    protected virtual void Dispose( bool disposing )
    {
      if ( !disposed_ )
      {
        if ( disposing )
        {
          // Clear managed resources
        }

        Marshal.FreeHGlobal( memoryPtr_ );
      }
      disposed_ = true;
    }
}

I have written two tests to ensure that the memory is being freed properly:

public MappedMemory_finalizer_frees_memory()
{
  for( var i = 0; i < 1e8; i++ )
  {
    var memory = new MappedMemory( 128 );
  }
}

public MappedMemory_dispose_frees_memory()
{
  for( var i = 0; i < 1e8; i++ )
  {
    var memory = new MappedMemory( 128 );
    memory.Dispose();
  }
}

When the tests are run, the test that manually calls Dispose() works as it should, and memory stays at a constant utilization.

The test for the finalizer, however, does not appear to be freeing the allocated memory, and it leaks out of control until it runs out of memory. I have set a breakpoint and the call to Marshal.FreeHGlobal( memoryPtr_ ) is hit.

Manually adding GC.Collect() to the test fixes the problem, so ultimately it appears that the memory is deallocated, but not garbage collected?

I am super confused as to what is happening here. Can someone explain why the finalizer does not free the memory, and how I can ensure that it does in production?

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  • 3
    This is why we use the using statement to ensure call to dispose method. You can also try to turn of server GC to see when your memory will be collected. The server GC is triggered only if necessary depending on differents factor like remaining memory, number of cpu,...
    – Kalten
    Feb 11, 2019 at 20:07

1 Answer 1

4

From the MSDN documentation here: https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/dotnet/csharp/programming-guide/classes-and-structs/destructors

The programmer has no control over when the finalizer is called because this is determined by the garbage collector. The garbage collector checks for objects that are no longer being used by the application. If it considers an object eligible for finalization, it calls the finalizer (if any) and reclaims the memory used to store the object.

As you say that forcing garbage collection frees the memory I suspect that the issue you're seeing is that there isn't enough pressure on the memory systems to cause garbage collection to run automatically. Garbage collection is a relatively expensive process so it is not run unless there is a reason to do so.

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  • Hmm, interesting. The finalizer is being called here, but under more careful inspection it isn't being called as often as a new instance is being constructed. I suppose it is something that will need to be explicitly handled in the consuming classes.
    – Haus
    Feb 11, 2019 at 20:22

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