1

The below code results in the following compile error:

error: no matching member function for call to 'push' 
st.push(ptr);

The issue goes away if I remove the const for the ptr parameter within func. So this seems to mean that you can't push a constant pointer into a stack. Why is this the case? It also appears to give the same error if I try to push it into std::queue, and I suspect other containers as well.

#include <iostream>
#include <stack>

void func(const int *&ptr)
{
   std::stack<int *> st;
   st.push(ptr);
}

int main(int argc, char const *argv[])
{    
   int i = 2;
   auto ptr = &i;
   func(ptr);
}
3
  • 1
    A const T * cannot be converted implicitly (and should pretty much never be converted explicitly) to a T *. You are trying to store a const int * to a container of int * which would require a conversion. Feb 11, 2019 at 20:24
  • 1
    its not "constant pointer" but pointer to const int
    – marcinj
    Feb 11, 2019 at 20:25
  • Decide whether your stack is going to contain constant objects, or not. If it is, then you'll have no difficulty only passing pointers to constant objects. It not, then don't try putting pointers to const objects into it. Feb 11, 2019 at 20:35

2 Answers 2

2

The intent of a const pointer is to make sure that the pointed object cannot be modified (at least not via this pointer).

If you could tranform the const int* into int* when pushing the pointer onto the stack, you could then change the object by poping the non const pointer. This is why this code doesn't compile.

The solution is to make the stack a stack of const pointers

void func(const int *&ptr)
{
   std::stack<const int *> st;
   st.push(ptr);
}

Now this is not sufficient: your problem will then shift the error message to the caller. You can solve this:

int main(int argc, char const *argv[])
{    
   int i = 2;
   const int* ptr = &i;   // <------ not auto
   func(ptr);
}

Why ? Because the function expects a reference to a const pointer as parameter. Passing a normal pointer ptr does not allow to build a reference to a const pointer.

If you would pass the pointer by value instead by reference, it would work whether ptr is const or not, because the compiler is allowed to implicitly convert a non const pointer value to a const one.

1

Make the stack contain const int *:

void func(const int *&ptr)
{
   std::stack<const int *> st;  // <== Add const before int * here.
   st.push(ptr);
}

Explanation:

A const pointer means: You can read the thing it points to, but you cannot write to the thing it points to. And a non-const pointer (i.e. a normal pointer) may read and write the thing it points to. The compiler always checks that you only ever tighten the capabilities when assigning pointers.

You may push non-const pointers into a stack containing const pointers. The pointers in the stack will always be const pointers and will be able to do less than your original pointer.

On the other hand, you may not push const pointers into a stack of non-const pointers (this is your case), because then you would be able to do more with the pointers in the stack than you were previously allowed.

In other words: You may always add const along the way, but you may never (*) remove it again.

(*) You can remove const by casting, but you should only do it if you know exactly what you are doing. This is usually not necessary.

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