-3

Say I have a string, string = 'a'

I do string.split() and I get ['a']

I don't want this, I only want a list when I have whitespace in my string, ala string = 'a b c d'

So far, I've tried all the following with no luck:

>>> a = 'a'
>>> a.split()
['a']
>>> a = 'a b'
>>> a.split(' ')
['a', 'b']
>>> a = 'a'
>>> a.split(' ')
['a']
>>> import re
>>> re.findall(r'\S+', a)
['a']
>>> re.findall(r'\S', a)
['a']
>>> re.findall(r'\S+', a)
['a', 'b']
>>> re.split(r'\s+', a)
['a', 'b']
>>> a = 'a'
>>> re.split(r'\s+', a)
['a']
>>> a.split(" ")
['a']
>>> a = "a"
>>> a.split(" ")
['a']
>>> a.strip().split(" ")
['a']
>>> a = "a".strip()
>>> a.split(" ")
['a']

Am I crazy? I see no whitespace in the string "a".

>>> r"[^\S\n\t]+"
'[^\\S\\n\\t]+'
>>> print(re.findall(r'[^\S\n\t]+',a))
[]

What up?

EDIT

FWIW, this is how I got what I needed:

# test for linked array
if typename == 'org.apache.ctakes.typesystem.type.textsem.ProcedureMention':
    for f in AnnotationType.all_features:
        if 'Array' in f.rangeTypeName:
            if attributes.get(f.name) and typesystem.get_type(f.elementType):
                print([ int(i) for i in attributes[f.name].split() ])

and that is the end...

  • 2
    split just returns a list. that's what up. – Steve Feb 12 at 1:59
  • 2
    The method .split() applied to a string will always return a list of all the sub-strings in that spring, split by spaces (unless another splitting character is provided). 'a' has one sub-string, namely 'a' and that's what is returned in the list ['a']. – Grismar Feb 12 at 1:59
  • 2
    "I only want a list when I have whitespace in my string" - bad idea. It's much easier to work with a result that's consistently a list, instead of sometimes a string and sometimes a list. A str.split that worked the way you ask for would be a major source of bugs. – user2357112 Feb 12 at 1:59
  • .split() always returns a list even if does not split the string, and this is probably the more consistent behaviour. See docs.python.org/3/library/stdtypes.html#str.split – Selcuk Feb 12 at 2:02
  • 1
    You're falling into a common newbie trap, where you think "wouldn't it be easier if the result of this operation was just a single [thing] instead of a [container] of [things] when there's only one [thing], so I don't have to get the [thing] out of the [container]", but in fact, not having a consistent return type means you have to write more code to conditionally work with either a single thing or a container of things. In fact, you usually end up putting the single thing in a container anyway, as the easiest way to deal with both cases. – user2357112 Feb 12 at 2:03
2

Split will always return a list, try this.

def split_it(s):
    if len(s.split()) > 1:
        return s.split()
    else:
        return s
  • 1
    Thanks! It's been a LONG day. I think it's time to quit! Oy! – horcle_buzz Feb 12 at 2:05
  • 1
    Np! 10 points for throwing as much as you did at it, looks gruelling. – blewittrb Feb 12 at 2:08
  • 1
    I've had worse. Needed to determine if a feature/attribute in an XMI annotation/tag is a representation of an array. It's just Monday dead brain syndrome. – horcle_buzz Feb 12 at 2:12
  • 1
    @horcle_buzz: This seems like a bad way to check that. After all, your attribute could be a representation of an array that happens to have only one element. – user2357112 Feb 12 at 2:17
  • 1
    Actually, I have it. I'm using a data structure (UIMA CAS) that has a defined type system definition file. I can just search the type system file for attributes/features that are arrays! Thanks @user2357112 for getting me to think a bit deeper. – horcle_buzz Feb 12 at 2:23
1

The behavior of split makes sense, it always returns a list. Why not just check if the list length is 1?

def weird_split(a):
    words = a.split()
    if len(words) == 1:
        return words[0]
    return words
0

You could use the conditional expression to check for the presence of space, and use split only if a space is detected:

str1 = 'abc'
split_str1 = str1 if (' ' not in str1) else str1.split(' ')
print (split_str1)
str1 = 'ab c'
split_str1 = str1 if (' ' not in str1) else str1.split(' ')
print (split_str1)

This would give the output:

abc
['ab', 'c']

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