This question already has an answer here:

Sorry for that dumb question. How can I use a condition for a case in the javascript switch-case language element? Like in the example below, a case should match when the variable liCount is <=5 and >0; however, my code does not work:

switch (liCount) {
    case 0:
        setLayoutState('start');
        var api = $('#UploadList').data('jsp');
        api.reinitialise();
        break;
    case (liCount<=5 && liCount>0):
        setLayoutState('upload1Row');
        var api = $('#UploadList').data('jsp');
        api.reinitialise();
        break;
    case (liCount<=10 && liCount>5):
        setLayoutState('upload2Rows');
        var api = $('#UploadList').data('jsp');
        api.reinitialise();
        break;
    case (liCount>10):
        var api = $('#UploadList').data('jsp');
        api.reinitialise();
        break;                  
}

Thanks for any advice!

marked as duplicate by DanMan, icktoofay javascript Dec 22 '14 at 0:36

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

  • 2
    use if statements instead if u want to do that.. – Neal Mar 28 '11 at 19:59
  • 1
    added a new answer below, this is totally possible and you should ignore everyone telling you to use ifs. – dmp Jan 29 '12 at 18:29
  • 3
    You should not ignore everyone telling you to use ifs, because they are right. This is a terrible application of switch. – lincolnk Jul 19 '14 at 0:08
  • I can't believe this solution hasn't been provided. You can do this, the statement just needs to evaluate to the value in the switch clause. So this would work: var liCount = 2; switch (liCount) { case 0: console.log(0); break; case (liCount<=5 && liCount>0) && liCount: console.log('liCount<=5 && liCount>0'); break; case (liCount<=10 && liCount>5) && liCount: console.log('liCount<=10 && liCount>5'); break; case (liCount>10) && liCount: console.log(liCount); break; } – Noitidart Dec 24 '16 at 8:56
up vote 7 down vote accepted

See dmp's answer below. I'd delete this answer if I could, but it was accepted so this is the next best thing :)

You can't. JS Interpreters require you to compare against the switch statement (e.g. there is no "case when" statement). If you really want to do this, you can just make if(){ .. } else if(){ .. } blocks.

  • 9
    That's incorrect. Here's a demo showing it working: jsfiddle.net/Ender/fr3wL. The ECMAScript standard explicitly states that this is allowed: docstore.mik.ua/orelly/webprog/jscript/ch06_05.htm#FOOTNOTE-18 – Ender Mar 28 '11 at 20:13
  • 3
    @Ender How is that the same as what haemse is trying to do? – Aistina Jan 30 '12 at 20:16
  • @Aistina It's not. Since his case conditions produce a true/false value rather than a numerical value, haemse would have needed to test his cases for a truthy value (such as suggested by danp's answer), rather than testing against the numerical value of liCount. I was merely pointing out that cwolves original statement that "JS Interpreters require case statements to be static values" was incorrect. cwolves has since revised this statement, so my comment is no longer relevant. – Ender Jan 31 '12 at 17:00
  • how is the best answer downvoted to hell – Gabriel ThaKid Jul 17 '14 at 8:12
  • Because this doesn't answer the question. He didn't ask for a different way to do it, he asked to make the switch-case work like he wants. "Do it some other way" is almost never a correct answer in spite of us pretty much always thinking it is. We always think we have a better way, but that's not how he wants to do it, making this answer just plain wrong. – Jasmine Jul 21 '14 at 21:19

This works:

switch (true) {
    case liCount == 0:
        setLayoutState('start');
        var api = $('#UploadList').data('jsp');
        api.reinitialise();
        break;
    case liCount<=5 && liCount>0:
        setLayoutState('upload1Row');
        var api = $('#UploadList').data('jsp');
        api.reinitialise();
        break;
    case liCount<=10 && liCount>5:
        setLayoutState('upload2Rows');
        var api = $('#UploadList').data('jsp');
        api.reinitialise();
        break;
    case liCount>10:
        var api = $('#UploadList').data('jsp');
        api.reinitialise();
        break;                  
}

A previous version of this answer considered the parentheses to be the culprit. In truth, the parentheses are irrelevant here - the only thing necessary is switch(true){...} and for your case expressions to evaluate to booleans.

It works because, the value we give to the switch is used as the basis to compare against. Consequently, the case expressions, also evaluating to booleans will determine which case is run. Could also turn this around, and pass switch(false){..} and have the desired expressions evaluate to false instead of true.. but personally prefer dealing with conditions that evaluate to truthyness. However, it does work too, so worth keeping in mind to understand what it is doing.

Eg: if liCount is 3, the first comparison is true === (liCount == 0), meaning the first case is false. The switch then moves on to the next case true === (liCount<=5 && liCount>0). This expression evaluates to true, meaning this case is run, and terminates at the break. I've added parentheses here to make it clearer, but they are optional, depending on the complexity of your expression.

It's pretty simple, and a neat way (if it fits with what you are trying to do) of handling a long series of conditions, where perhaps a long series of ìf() ... else if() ... else if () ... might introduce a lot of visual noise or fragility.

Use with caution, because it is a non-standard pattern, despite being valid code.

  • 6
    I think you'd need to have switch(true) {, and case liCount == 0: right? Otherwise this comparison is liCount == (liCount <=5 && liCount > 0). – loganfsmyth Jan 29 '12 at 18:37
  • 1
    dead right, updated to reflect this. thanks! – dmp Jan 29 '12 at 19:23
  • Thanks for sharing, I did not know this way of checking nested ifs with switch case. – Anmol Saraf Jan 2 '13 at 11:49
  • 17
    You know, it's not because you can that you should. This is something which needs to be killed with fire. – JBert Jul 18 '14 at 8:03
  • 10
    It's part of the language - consequently, knowing about it is better than not. Clearly, it would not be appropriate for every situation, but on a purely subjective level, I think this is an interesting approach, and more legible/less fragile than a series of ifs/elifs in this case. The important thing to remember is that coding is an expression of intent, coupled with taste and practice. Having more options to clearly express yourself in code is never a bad thing. – dmp Oct 26 '14 at 12:01

You've way overcomplicated that. Write it with if statements instead like this:

if(liCount == 0)
    setLayoutState('start');
else if(liCount<=5)
    setLayoutState('upload1Row');
else if(liCount<=10)
    setLayoutState('upload2Rows');

$('#UploadList').data('jsp').reinitialise();

Or, if ChaosPandion is trying to optimize as much as possible:

setLayoutState(liCount == 0 ? 'start' :
               liCount <= 5 ? 'upload1Row' :
               liCount <= 10 ? 'upload2Rows' :
               null);

$('#UploadList').data('jsp').reinitialise();
  • You had to go and one up me. :) – ChaosPandion Mar 28 '11 at 20:06
  • We wrote our posts simultaneously. I didn't see yours until I'd already posted. You appear to be overdoing it now... – Eric Mar 28 '11 at 20:07
  • Wow I didn't really think about the overly complex conditionals. – ChaosPandion Mar 28 '11 at 20:10
  • 1
    @Chaos: yeah, that's probably overdoing it. You'd have to add a null-check to setLayoutState as well :P. – Eric Mar 28 '11 at 20:11
  • @Eric - some programmers with more programming laps under their belt than I have say: "just because you can write Javascript without braces (and - in fact with care - semicolons) doesn't mean you should", But I just rewrote some multiple if statements as in your example anyway, so thanks - works fine until there's more than one line to execute after the condition. The ternary solution was a bridge too far for me, though… – Dave Everitt Jun 1 '16 at 14:54

You want to use if statements:

if (liCount === 0) {
    setLayoutState('start');
} else if (liCount <= 5) {
    setLayoutState('upload1Row');
} else if (liCount <= 10) {
    setLayoutState('upload2Rows');
}
$('#UploadList').data('jsp').reinitialise();  

That's a case where you should use if clauses.

switch (true) {
  case condition0:
    ...
    break;
  case condition1:
    ...
    break;
}

will work in JavaScript as long as your conditions return proper boolean values, but it doesn't have many advantages over else if statements.

If that's what you want to do, it would be better to use if statements. For example:

if(liCount == 0){
    setLayoutState('start');
}
if(liCount<=5 && liCount>0){
    setLayoutState('upload1Row');
}
if(liCount<=10 && liCount>5){
    setLayoutState('upload2Rows');
}             
var api = $('#UploadList').data('jsp');
    api.reinitialise();

Your code does not work because it is not doing what you are expecting it to do. Switch blocks take in a value, and compare each case to the given value, looking for equality. Your comparison value is an integer, but most of your case expressions resolve to a boolean value.

So, for example, say liCount = 2. Your first case will not match, because 2 != 0. Your second case, (liCount<=5 && liCount>0) evaluates to true, but 2 != true, so this case will not match either.

For this reason, as many others have said, you should use a series of if...then...else if blocks to do this.

if the possible values are integers you can bunch up cases. Otherwise, use ifs.

var api, tem;

switch(liCount){
    case 0:
    tem= 'start';
    break;
    case 1: case 2: case 3: case 4: case 5:
    tem= 'upload1Row';
    break;
    case 6: case 7: case 8: case 9: case 10:
    tem= 'upload2Rows';
    break;
    default:
    break;
}
if(tem) setLayoutState((tem);
api= $('#UploadList').data('jsp');
api.reinitialise();

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