-1

I know the purpose of using statement is that CLR release memory as the code block finishes, so

using (MyResource myRes = new MyResource())
{
    myRes.DoSomething();

}

will get translated to :

MyResource myRes= new MyResource();
try
{
    myRes.DoSomething();
}
finally
{
    // Check for a null resource.
    if (myRes!= null)
        // Call the object's Dispose method.
        ((IDisposable)myRes).Dispose();
}

But I still have a question, why is the syntax of using statement not like:

MyResource myRes = new MyResource();
using {
   myRes.DoSomething();
}

why we have to insert the cost resource statement in the round brackets?

  • 5
    Maybe you don't want to dispose everything that is disposable inside using statement. – FCin Feb 12 at 6:18
  • As above, if you allocate three resources, say, how does the compiler know which ones to dispose of? – Ken Y-N Feb 12 at 6:21
  • 1
    You don't have to use using. You can just call Dispose() directly. The using syntax is helpful because it makes clear the useful scope of a disposable variable, and as such is tied to that variable. – John Wu Feb 12 at 6:21
  • 1
    The simple answer is "because the C# design team didn't make it that way." There are many patterns they could have considered (and continue to consider) but this is the one they chose. – BJ Myers Feb 12 at 6:22
  • That's cause DoSomething() is not disposable but rather the containing instance is – Rahul Feb 12 at 6:52
1

We write the resource we want to automatically dispose inside the brackets to let the compiler know exactly which resource we mean. If we just let the compiler guess, it might not guess correctly every time, and spotting this mistake can be very difficult. Let's say the compiler will release the first disposable resource declared above the using, then the resource to be disposed will change, if someone just writes another declaration between the declaration and the using.

Having to write the resource "together" with the using is a very clear way to show that you are using that resource, otherwise it just looks like two unrelated statements.

Another advantage is that if you write the declaration outside of the using, the declaration is still in scope outside the using. At some later parts of your code, you could be accidentally using some resource that is already disposed.

0

Well, it's not syntactically valid to be written like that, mostly because it's not clear what you would be "using" there... and you still need to close and dispose of the resources to avoid a potential memory leak.

Plus, see the example provided in the docs, which is not recommended because the object being in-scope provides opportunities for errors only catchable at runtime upon use of closed IDisposable resources

Font font2 = new Font("Arial", 10.0f);
using (font2) // not recommended
{
    // use font2
}
// font2 is still in scope
// but the method call throws an exception
float f = font2.GetHeight();
0

Using is meant to clear the useful lifespan of a disposable object; it has to be associated with a variable to serve that purpose.

Also, if you declare it the recommended way, the language makes it impossible to access the object after it has been disposed:

using (var myRes = new Resource())
{
    myRes.Foo();
}
myRes.Bar(); //Will not compile due to "name does not exist in the current context"

If we did it your way, the compiler would not prevent this kind of error:

var myRes= new Resource();
using
{
    myRes.Foo();
}
myRes.Bar(); //Compiles; allows access to disposed object, which is usually bad

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