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i'm a beginner in python and I have some problems with combining data.

What I want to do is deal with my data, completely discarding columns that have Nan values.

But the indices of Nan values are different in most of my data.

For example,

data1 = np.array([1, 2, np.nan, 4, 5])
data2 = np.array([1, np.nan, 3, 4, 6])
data3 = np.array([np.nan, 2, 3, 4, 7])

ind_1 = np.where(~np.isnan(data1))
ind_2 = np.where(~np.isnan(data2))
ind_3 = np.where(~np.isnan(data3))

-----

data1_out = data1[ind_1[0]]  # array([ 1., 2., 4., 5.])
data2_out = data2[ind_2[0]]  # array([ 1., 3., 4., 6.])
data3_out = data3[ind_3[0]]  # array([ 2., 3., 4., 7.])

but what i need is an arrays like

data1_out = array([ 4., 5.])
data2_out = array([ 4., 6.])
data3_out = array([ 4., 7.])

So I think the combined array like

ind_c = intersection(ind_1, ind_2, ind_3)
data1_out = data1[ind_c[0]]

would solve the problem!

which is shared output with others, so if the index of one data set has Nan value, it influence all same index of other data set.

I can't find a simple way to do this. Any advise?

  • It's customary to select an answer if one works for you. – Mad Physicist Feb 12 at 6:44
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>>> truth = ~np.isnan(data1) & ~np.isnan(data2) & ~np.isnan(data3)
>>> data1[truth]
[4. 5.]
>>> data2[truth]
[4. 5.]
>>> data3[truth]
[4. 5.]
  • 1
    It's simple!! thanks a lot !! really!! – SJ_Lee Feb 12 at 6:42
  • Okay, now i recognize it. Thank you!! – SJ_Lee Feb 13 at 4:54
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There's a very simple way to do this. Instead of using where to get numerical indices, stick with the Boolean mask generated by isnan. Masks are easier to combine and often easier to work with in other ways as well, not to mention that it saves you a step per array.

mask_1 = ~np.isnan(data1)
mask_2 = ~np.isnan(data2)
mask_3 = ~np.isnan(data3)

Now you can combine the masks into one using simple Boolean operations, and apply the result to each of the arrays:

mask = mask_1 & mask_2 & mask_3
data1_out = data1[mask] 
data2_out = data2[mask] 
data3_out = data3[mask] 

Now any time you find yourself working with identically shaped arrays named like x1, x2, x3, etc..., you probably want just one array with an extra dimension. 99% of the time, it will make your life easier:

data = np.array([[1, 2, np.nan, 4, 5],
                 [1, np.nan, 3, 4, 6],
                 [np.nan, 2, 3, 4, 7]])
mask = ~np.isnan(data).any(axis=0)
data_out = data[np.arange(data.shape[0]).reshape(-1, 1), mask]

any applies | to all the elements. np.arange(data.shape[0]).reshape(-1, 1) creates a column vector that forces the 1D mask to be applied to each row through broadcasting.

Of course this approach is predicated on there being an equal number of NaNs in each row. If that's not the case, you'll have to use the separate arrays indeed.

  • Wow it's gorgeous, it really helped!! Thank you sir! :) – SJ_Lee Feb 12 at 6:38
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Combine all arrays into a 2D array:

z = np.stack([data1, data2, data3])

Find the non-nan columns:

columns = ~np.isnan(z).any(axis=0)

Select the data:

data1, data2, data3 = z[:, columns]
#array([4., 5.])
#....
  • Although it's not simplest way, it inspired me! Thank you sir!! – SJ_Lee Feb 12 at 6:46

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