83

var a = {}
var b = {}

try{
  a.x.y = b.e = 1 // Uncaught TypeError: Cannot set property 'y' of undefined
} catch(err) {
  console.error(err);
}
console.log(b.e) // 1

var a = {}
var b = {}

try {
  a.x.y.z = b.e = 1 // Uncaught TypeError: Cannot read property 'y' of undefined
} catch(err) {
  console.error(err);
}

console.log(b.e) // undefined

  • 3
    @NinaScholz: I don't understand. There is no syntax error; so I would assume that b.z = 1 and b.e = 1 execute first (given right-associativity on =), then a.x.y.z = ... execute and fail; why does b assignment pass in one case but not in the other? – Amadan Feb 12 at 9:21
  • 3
    @NinaScholz We agree that the property y does not exist on a.x; but that is true in both cases. Why does it prevent the right-hand-side assignment in the second case but not the first? What is different in the order of execution? (I mentioned Syntax error because the timing on the syntax error is very different from that of a runtime error.) – Amadan Feb 12 at 9:24
  • @Amadan after running code you will get error, and than use than type variable name again to see value – Code Maniac Feb 12 at 9:28
  • 2
    Found this describe how Javascript proceed assignment operation ecma-international.org/ecma-262/5.1/#sec-11.13 – Solomon Tam Feb 12 at 9:40
  • What do you think the difference is? Did you try to reason this out before asking? What did your research turn up? In other words, did you do your homework before asking? – jpmc26 2 days ago
128

Actually, if you read the error message properly, case 1 and case 2 throw different errors.

Case a.x.y:

Cannot set property 'y' of undefined

Case a.x.y.z:

Cannot read property 'y' of undefined

I guess it's best to describe it by step-by-step execution in easy English.

Case 1

// 1. Declare variable `a`
// 2. Define variable `a` as {}
var a = {}

// 1. Declare variable `b`
// 2. Define variable `b` as {}
var b = {}

try {

  /**
   *  1. Read `a`, gets {}
   *  2. Read `a.x`, gets undefined
   *  3. Read `b`, gets {}
   *  4. Set `b.z` to 1, returns 1
   *  5. Set `a.x.y` to return value of `b.z = 1`
   *  6. Throws "Cannot **set** property 'y' of undefined"
   */
  a.x.y = b.z = 1
  
} catch(e){
  console.error(e.message)
} finally {
  console.log(b.z)
}

Case 2

// 1. Declare variable `a`
// 2. Define variable `a` as {}
var a = {}

// 1. Declare variable `b`
// 2. Define variable `b` as {}
var b = {}

try {

  /**
   *  1. Read `a`, gets {}
   *  2. Read `a.x`, gets undefined
   *  3. Read `a.x.y`, throws "Cannot **read** property 'y' of undefined".
   */
  a.x.y.z = b.z = 1
  
} catch(e){
  console.error(e.message)
} finally {
  console.log(b.z)
}

In comments, Solomon Tam found this ECMA documentation about assignment operation.

50

The order of operations is clearer when you exploit the comma operator inside bracket notation to see which parts are executed when:

var a = {}
var b = {}

try{
 // Uncaught TypeError: Cannot set property 'y' of undefined
  a
    [console.log('x'), 'x']
    [console.log('y'), 'y']
    = (console.log('right hand side'), b.e = 1);
} catch(err) {
  console.error(err);
}
console.log(b.e) // 1

var a = {}
var b = {}

try {
  // Uncaught TypeError: Cannot read property 'y' of undefined
  a
    [console.log('x'), 'x']
    [console.log('y'), 'y']
    [console.log('z'), 'z']
    = (console.log('right hand side'), b.e = 1);
} catch(err) {
  console.error(err);
}

console.log(b.e) // undefined

Looking at the spec:

The production AssignmentExpression : LeftHandSideExpression = AssignmentExpression is evaluated as follows:

  1. Let lref be the result of evaluating LeftHandSideExpression.

  2. Let rref be the result of evaluating AssignmentExpression.

  3. Let rval be GetValue(rref).

  4. Throw a SyntaxError exception if... (irrelevant)

  5. Call PutValue(lref, rval).

PutValue is what throws the TypeError:

  1. Let O be ToObject(base).

  2. If the result of calling the [[CanPut]] internal method of O with argument P is false, then

    a. If Throw is true, then throw a TypeError exception.

Nothing can be assigned to a property of undefined - the [[CanPut]] internal method of undefined will always return false.

In other words: the interpreter parses the left-hand side, then parses the right-hand side, then throws an error if the property on the left-hand side can't be assigned to.

When you do

a.x.y = b.e = 1

The left hand side is successfully parsed up until PutValue is called; the fact that the .x property evaluates to undefined is not considered until after the right-hand side is parsed. The interpreter sees it as "Assign some value to the property "y" of undefined", and assigning to a property of undefined only throws inside PutValue.

In contrast:

a.x.y.z = b.e = 1

The interpreter never gets to the point where it tries to assign to the z property, because it first must resolve a.x.y to a value. If a.x.y resolved to a value (even to undefined), it would be OK - an error would be thrown inside PutValue like above. But accessing a.x.y throws an error, because property y cannot be accessed on undefined.

  • 18
    Nice comma operator trick--never thought to use it that way (for debugging only, of course)! – ecraig12345 Feb 12 at 9:51
  • 2
    s/parse/evaluate/ – Bergi Feb 12 at 13:26
1

Consider the following examples and try to answer the simple questions:

var a = {}; a.x = 1;
  • Does the engine need to access x? No – having a reference of a is sufficient for setting the property x.
  • Does the engine evaluate right hand side? Yes.
  • Does the assignment work? Yes.
var a = {}; a.x.y = 1;
  • Does the engine need to access x? Yes – it needs a reference to x so that it can set the property y.
  • Does the engine throw an error if x is not set? No – it simple returns undefined.
  • Does the engine need to access y? No – see previous example.
  • Does the engine evaluate right hand side? Yes.
  • Does the assignment work? No – on the left hand side you have a reference (undefined) and a target property name (y) and you cannot set a property on undefined.

Note that the behavior has little to do with assignment operator:

[Step 1.] a. Let lref be the result of evaluating LeftHandSideExpression.

The above seems to suggest that evaluating a.x.y should throw the error in the first place. But it does not because the property accessor is evaluated as:

MemberExpression : MemberExpression . IdentifierName

  1. Let baseReference be the result of evaluating MemberExpression.
  2. Let baseValue be GetValue(baseReference).
  3. ReturnIfAbrupt(baseValue).
  4. Let bv be RequireObjectCoercible(baseValue).
  5. ReturnIfAbrupt(bv).
  6. Let propertyNameString be StringValue of IdentifierName
  7. If the code matched by the syntactic production that is being evaluated is strict mode code, let strict be true, else let strict be false.
  8. Return a value of type Reference whose base value is bv and whose referenced name is propertyNameString, and whose strict reference flag is strict.

Notice that the IdentifierName (the portion on the right side of dot) is not evaluated.

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