0

So, in my framework X, let it be Phalcon, I often create models objects.

Let's assume that all fields already validated. Questions related only about creation logic.

A simple example of creating Users object and save it to DB:

<?php

$user = new Users();
$user->setName($name);
$user->setLastName($lastname);
$user->setAge($age);
$user->create();

For simplicity, I show here only 3 fields to setup, in the real world they always more.

I have 3 questions:

1) What the best way to encapsulate this logic in Factory class? If I create Factory class that will create objects like Users object, every time I will need pass long amount of parameters.

Example:

<?php

$factory = new UsersFactory();
$factory->make($name, $lastname, $address, $phone, $status, $active);

2) Even if I implement Factory in a way showed above - should Factory insert data in DB? In my example call method create()? Or just perform all setters operations?

3) And even more, what if i will need to create Users objects with relations, with other related objects?

Thank you for any suggestions.

0

Your question starts out simple and then builds with complexity. Reading your post it sounds like your concerned about the number of arguments you would have to pass to the method to build the object. This is a reasonable fear as you should try to avoid functions which take more than 2 or 3 args, and because sometimes you will need to pass the 1st 3rd and 5th arg but not the 2nd and 4th which just gets uncomfortable.

I would instead encourage you to look at the builder pattern.

In the end it will not be that much different than just using your User object directly however it will help you prevent having a User object in an invalid state ( required fields not set )

1) What the best way to encapsulate this logic in Factory class? If I create Factory class that will create objects like Users object, every time I will need pass long amount of parameters.

This is why I recommended the builder pattern. To avoid passing a large number of params to a single function. It also would allow you to validate state in the build method and handle or throw exceptions.

class UserBuilder {
  protected $data = [];
  public static function named($fname, $lname) {
    $b = new static;
    return $b
      ->withFirstName($fname)
      ->withLastName($lname);
  }
  public function withFirstName($fname) {
    $this->data['first_name'] = $fname;
    return $this;
  }
  public function withFirstName($lname) {
    $this->data['last_name'] = $lname;
    return $this;
  }
  public function withAge($age) {
    $this->data['age'] = $age;
    return $this;
  }
  public function build() {
    $this->validate();
    $d = $this->data;
    $u = new User;
    $u->setFirstName($d['first_name']);
    $u->setLastName($d['last_name']);
    $u->setAge($d['age']);
    return $u;
  }
  protected function validate() {
    $d = $this->data;
    if (empty($d['age'])) {
      throw new Exception('age is required');
    }
  }
}

then you just do..

$user = UserBuilder::named('John','Doe')->withAge(32);

now instead of the number of function arguments growing with each param, the number of methods grows.

2) Even if I implement Factory in a way showed above - should Factory insert data in DB? In my example call method create()? Or just perform all setters operations?

no it should not insert. it should just help you build the object, not assume what your going to do with it. You may release that once you build it you will want to do something else with it before insert.

3) And even more, what if i will need to create Users objects with relations, with other related objects?

In Phalcon those relationships are part of the entity. You can see in their docs this example:

// Create an artist
$artist = new Artists();

$artist->name    = 'Shinichi Osawa';
$artist->country = 'Japan';

// Create an album
$album = new Albums();

$album->name   = 'The One';
$album->artist = $artist; // Assign the artist
$album->year   = 2008;

// Save both records
$album->save();

So to relate this back to your user example, suppose you wanted to store address information on the user but the addresses are stored in a different table. The builder could expose methods to define the address and the build method would create both entities together and return the built User object which has a reference to the Address object inside it because of how Phalcon models work.

  • Thank you for such a great and long comment. Now it more clear to me. – Denys Kurbatov Feb 13 at 16:14
0

I don't think it's entirely necessary to use a builder or "pattern" to dynamically populate your model properties. Though it is subjective to what you're after.

You can populate models through the constructor like this

$user = new Users([
    'name' => $name,
    'lastName' => $lastname,
    'age' => $age,
]);
$user->create();

This way you can dynamically populate your model by building the array instead of numerous method calls.


It's also worth noting that if you want to use "setters" and "getter" methods you should define the properties as protected. The reason for this is because Phalcon will automatically call the set/get methods if they exist when you assign a value to the protected property.

For example:

class User extends \Phalcon\Mvc\Model
{
    protected $name;

    public function setName(string $name): void
    {
        $this->name = $name;
    }

    public function getName(): string
    {
        return $this->name;
    }
}

$user= new MyModel();
$user->name = 'Cameron'; // This will invoke User::setName
echo $user->name; // This will invoke User::getName

It is also worth noting that the properties will behave as you'd expect a protected property to behave the same as a traditional protected property if the respective method is missing. For example, you cannot assign a value to a protected model property without a setter method.

Your Answer

By clicking "Post Your Answer", you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.