-4
func parallelSum (c chan int){
  sum := 0
  for i :=1 ; i< 100;i++{
    go func(i int){
        sum += i
    }(i)
  }
    time.Sleep(1*time.Second)
    c <- sum
}

I'm trying to learn the parallel ability to speed up things like OpenMP. And here is an example of the intended summing up parallel loop in Go, this function runs as a goroutine.

Note that the variable sum is not a channel here, so does this mean the variable sum access inside the for loop is a blocked operation? Is it now efficient enough? Is there a better solution?

I knew the channel feature was designed for this, my obviously wrong implement below can compile, but with 100 runtime errors like following.

goroutine 4 [chan receive]:
main.parallelSumError(0xc0000180c0)
    /home/tom/src/goland_newproject/main.go:58 +0xb4 //line 58 : temp := <-sum
created by main.main
    /home/tom/src/goland_newproject/main.go:128 +0x2ca //line 128: go parallelSumError(pcr), the calling function

So what's the problem here? it seems summing is not a good example for paralleled for-loop, but actually I wish to know how to use channel inside paralleled for-loop.

func parallelSum (c chan int){
    sum := make(chan int)
    for i :=1 ; i< 100;i++{
        go func(i int){
            temp := <- sum //error here why?
            temp += i
            sum <- temp
        }(i)
    }
    time.Sleep(1*time.Second)
    temp := <-sum
    c <- temp
}

both with the same main function

func main(){
    pc := make(chan int)
    go parallelSum(pc) 
    result = <- pc
    fmt.Println("parallel result:", result)
}
  • "but with 100 runtime errors" -- what errors? Your question isn't complete until you explain the problem you're trying to solve. – Flimzy Feb 12 '19 at 13:24
  • "So what's the problem here?" All of it. Concurrency is not Parallelism (worth googling it). Also: the error is pretty self explanatory: You must not write to the same variable from different goroutines. – Volker Feb 12 '19 at 13:25
  • To "speed up" such calculations: Split the problem into disjunct bunches of work which can be done really independently (this is a hard! problem). Then do these subproblems and combine afterwards. – Volker Feb 12 '19 at 13:27
  • I'm new to Go so plz you maybe too hard on me. My problem is simple, how to use channel inside paralleled for-loop. I use Go because people say it's faster and more advanced, so beyond my question I 'd like to know how to speed things up using paralleled for-loop, sum function seems a good challenge. – tomriddle_1234 Feb 12 '19 at 13:54
1
0

I don't like the idea of summing numbers through channels. I'd rather use something classical like sync.Mutex or atomic.AddUint64. But, at least, I made your code working. We aren't able to pass a value from one channel to another (I added temp variable). Also, there is sync.WaitGroup and other stuff. But I still don't like the idea of the code.

package main

import (
"fmt"
"sync"
)

func main() {
    pc := make(chan int)
    go parallelSum(pc)
    result := <- pc
    fmt.Println("parallel result:", result)
}


func parallelSum (c chan int){
    sum := make(chan int)


    wg := sync.WaitGroup{}
    wg.Add(100)

    for i :=1 ; i <= 100;i++{
        go func(i int){
            temp := <- sum
            temp += i
            wg.Done()

            sum <- temp
        }(i)
    }

    sum <- 0

    wg.Wait()
    temp := <- sum
    c <- temp
}
| improve this answer | |
  • can I ask sum <- 0 this line happens before the go func or after, what's the point here ? – tomriddle_1234 Feb 12 '19 at 13:49
  • you gave the solution but could you explain more? – tomriddle_1234 Feb 12 '19 at 13:55
  • there are two types of channels in go, buffered and non-buffered. So, every goroutine starts with waiting data from the channel sum and we need to put smth there. When non-buffered channel is used, writer waits for reader and reader waits for writer. if there is no writer, all readers wait forever. If you put sum <- 0 before function, paralleSum will be frozen, because no one will read the sum channel – Egorikas Feb 12 '19 at 14:10
  • I knew but how is it relevant? BTW, I got runtime error for your example, like parallel result: 4950 fatal error: all goroutines are asleep - deadlock! – tomriddle_1234 Feb 12 '19 at 14:14
  • ah It's my fault, I tried to use a defer wg.Done() at the beginning of the for loop, after put the wg.Done() at the right position like your example, it runs fine. Can I ask why it must be there ? – tomriddle_1234 Feb 12 '19 at 14:21
1
0

When using go routines (i.e. go foo()), it is preferable to use communication over memory-sharing. In this matter, as you mention, channels are the golang way to handle communication.

For your specific application, the paralleled sum similar to OpenMP, it would be preferable to detect the number of CPUs and generate as many routines as wished:

package main

import (
    "fmt"
    "runtime"
)

func main() {
    numCPU := runtime.NumCPU()
    sumc := make(chan int, numCPU)
    valuec := make(chan int)
    endc := make(chan interface{}, numCPU)

    // generate go routine per cpu
    for i := 0; i < numCPU; i++ {
        go sumf(sumc, valuec, endc)
    }

    // generate values and pass it through the channels
    for i := 0; i < 100; i++ {
        valuec <- i
    }

    // tell go routines to end up when they are done
    for i := 0; i < numCPU; i++ {
        endc <- nil
    }

    // sum results
    sum := 0
    for i := 0; i < numCPU; i++ {
        procSum := <-sumc
        sum += procSum
    }

    fmt.Println(sum)
}

func sumf(sumc, valuec chan int, endc chan interface{}) {
    sum := 0
    for {
        select {
        case i := <-valuec:
            sum += i
        case <-endc:
            sumc <- sum
            return
        }
    }
}

Hopefully, this helps.

| improve this answer | |
  • thankx for such clean solution! however this looks a bit tedious, do I have to explicitly distribute the task to cores ? In go routines doc, Go seems able to automatically optimize this ? – tomriddle_1234 Feb 13 '19 at 1:21
  • And the select in sumf is a bit confused to me, it's a new pattern to me, could you explain endc ? why and when case <-endc happen? – tomriddle_1234 Feb 13 '19 at 1:23
  • 1
    @tomriddle_1234 you could generate more go routines than cores and golang will distribute this as optimal as it can, however physically it is unlikely to get better performance. Regarding select there is a nice tour offered by golang.org: select. In simple words: select blocks until one of the cases are satsified, and then runs. Since sumf is a function that always waits for new data to come, it has to receive a signal to end, this is endc. Tell me if you need any additional explanation. – agastalver Feb 13 '19 at 8:13

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