30

When I create a temp table using a select into in SQL Server, is there a way to specify that a column should be nullable? I have a multi-step process where I'm making a temp table by selecting a lot of columns (which is why I'm not doing a create table #tmp (...)). After I make that temp table, I'm updating some columns and some of those updates might null out a field.

I know I could do an alter table alter column statement to achieve what I want, but I'm curious about whether there's a way to specify this in the select itself. I know you can inline cast your columns to get the desired datatype, but I can't see how you specify nullability.

25

Nullability is inherited from the source column.

You can lose or gain nullability with an expression:

Example (constant literals appear to be problematic - need a good NOOP function which can return NULL):

CREATE TABLE SO5465245_IN
    (
     a INT NOT NULL
    ,b INT NULL
    ) ;
GO

SELECT  COALESCE(a, NULL) AS a
       ,ISNULL(b, 0) AS b
       ,COALESCE(10, NULL) AS c1
       ,COALESCE(ABS(10), NULL) AS c2
       ,CASE WHEN COALESCE(10, NULL) IS NOT NULL THEN COALESCE(10, NULL) ELSE NULL END AS c3
INTO    SO5465245_OUT
FROM    SO5465245_IN ;
GO

SELECT  TABLE_NAME
       ,COLUMN_NAME
       ,IS_NULLABLE
FROM    INFORMATION_SCHEMA.COLUMNS
WHERE   TABLE_NAME LIKE 'SO5465245%'
ORDER BY TABLE_NAME
       ,ORDINAL_POSITION ;
GO

DROP TABLE SO5465245_IN ;
GO

DROP TABLE SO5465245_OUT ;
GO
  • NULLIF seems to work great when using a column. Your answer made me think to try COALESCE(col_name, null) which universally works without needing to invent an impossible value. However, there is one situation when neither appears to work, and that is when you are selecting a literal like select nullif('asdf', '~') as Value into _Test. NULLIF/COALESCE seems like it's good enough, but is there any other way that works in all situations? – mattmc3 Mar 28 '11 at 22:38
  • @mattmc3 - some operators circumvent that (for instance, ABS works int eh example above), but NULLIF isn't enough. – Cade Roux Mar 28 '11 at 23:40
13

This soulution I've recently come up with and though I should share:

select top 0
  B.*
into
  TargetTable
from
  SourceTable as A
    left join SourceTable as B on 1 = 0

This effectively creates a duplicated structure of SourceTable in TargetTable with all columns nullable (at least in sql2008).

  • 1
    This is a really great solution! I was trying to emulate tSQLt's FakeTable on a synonym we have that points to a view on another server, and this is a perfect, clean way to handle it. – cscott530 Oct 24 '18 at 16:07
2

CONVERT will make your columns nullable, and works for literals/constants too. Tested in SQL Server 2005/2008.

SELECT 
    SomeText = CONVERT(varchar(10), 'literal'),
    SomeNumber = CONVERT(int, 0)
INTO SO5465245

INSERT SO5465245 VALUES (null, null)

SELECT TABLE_NAME, COLUMN_NAME, DATA_TYPE, IS_NULLABLE
FROM INFORMATION_SCHEMA.COLUMNS
WHERE TABLE_NAME = 'SO5465245'
ORDER BY TABLE_NAME, ORDINAL_POSITION

DROP TABLE SO5465245
1

If you want to inherit nullablity for the destination column irrespective of the source table columns you can follow this query.

SELECT COLUMN1, COLUMN2, COLUMN3 INTO DestinationTable from SourceTable

if this was your query where COLUMN1,COLUMN2,COLUMN3 were not nullable in SourceTable then change the query as

SELECT NULL COLUMN1, NULL COLUMN2, NULL COLUMN3 INTO DestinationTable from SourceTable

so, this will allow you to insert null values in to the Destination table.

  • The down-side to this is you then have to drop the empty record – UnhandledExcepSean Sep 9 '15 at 12:52
  • In SQL Server, this makes the column to become of type int - which is not desirable. – Kilokahn Nov 11 '15 at 19:48
1

This works as well.

select *
into #so20150909
from table
where 1=0
0

I recently had the same issue - I wanted to use "select into", wanted all columns in the target table to be nullable & a repeatable approach where I didn't have to know the names of the fields in the source table.

select *
into dbo.I_Data
from
  (select 1[Z_1]) A
  full join (select null[Z_2], * from dbo.S_Data) B on A.Z_1 = B.Z_2

where dbo.S_Data is the source data table and [Z_1] & [Z_2] are two dummy columns used for the join

Then to clean up:

(a) Remove the row of nulls

delete dbo.I_Data where [Z_1] = 1

(b) Remove the dummy fields:

alter table dbo.I_Data 
  drop column [Z_1], [Z_2]

Regards.

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