-3

I don't understand how golang is outperforming c++ in this operation by 10 times, even the map lookup is 3 times faster in go than c++.

this is the c++ snippet

#include <iostream>
#include <unordered_map>
#include <chrono>

std::chrono::nanoseconds elapsed(std::chrono::steady_clock::time_point start) {
    std::chrono::steady_clock::time_point now = std::chrono::high_resolution_clock::now();
    return std::chrono::duration_cast<std::chrono::nanoseconds>(now - start);
}
void make_map(int times) {
    std::unordered_map<double, double> hm;
    double c = 0.0;
    for (int i = 0; i < times; i++) {
        hm[c] = c + 10.0;
        c += 1.0;
    }
}

int main() {
    std::chrono::steady_clock::time_point start_time = std::chrono::high_resolution_clock::now();
    make_map(10000000);
    printf("elapsed %lld", elapsed(start_time).count());
}

this is the golang snippet:

func makeMap() {
    o := make(map[float64]float64)
    var i float64 = 0
    x := time.Now()
    for ; i <= 10000000; i++ {
        o[i] = i+ 10
    }
    TimeTrack(x)
}
func TimeTrack(start time.Time) {
    elapsed := time.Since(start)

    // Skip this function, and fetch the PC and file for its parent.
    pc, _, _, _ := runtime.Caller(1)

    // Retrieve a function object this functions parent.
    funcObj := runtime.FuncForPC(pc)

    // Regex to extract just the function name (and not the module path).
    runtimeFunc := regexp.MustCompile(`^.*\.(.*)$`)
    name := runtimeFunc.ReplaceAllString(funcObj.Name(), "$1")

    log.Println(fmt.Sprintf("%s took %s", name, elapsed))
}

What I'd like to know is how to optimize the c++ to achieve better performance.

closed as unclear what you're asking by Neil Butterworth, peterSO, Paul Annetts, gsamaras, Chris Gong Feb 12 at 20:57

Please clarify your specific problem or add additional details to highlight exactly what you need. As it's currently written, it’s hard to tell exactly what you're asking. See the How to Ask page for help clarifying this question. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

  • 7
    What is your C++ compiler settings? You are also using time points from different clocks. – SergeyA Feb 12 at 19:07
  • 2
    Why two variables (c and i) in C++, but only one in Go? – Angew Feb 12 at 19:11
  • 1
    FWIW, benchmarking C++ code can be hard. Thankfully there are tools to help with it like Quick Bench which uses google's benchamarking library. – NathanOliver Feb 12 at 19:14
  • 2
    Re: " -DCMAKE_BUILD_TYPE=Debug" -- that's what I guessed when I saw the title. Debug builds aren't optimized and run much slower than non-debug builds. For almost every question that starts with "my C++ program is much slower than..." the answer is "turn on optimizations". – Pete Becker Feb 12 at 19:39
  • 2
    C++ performance in debug builds should not be spoken about. Turn on optimizations and get back to us. – SergeyA Feb 12 at 19:47
1

Updated to measure similar operations for both cpp and go. It starts measurment before calling the map-making function and ends it when the function returns. Both versions reserve space in the map and return the created map (from which a couple of numbers are printed).

Slightly modified cpp:

#include <iostream>
#include <unordered_map>
#include <chrono>

std::unordered_map<double, double> make_map(double times) {
    std::unordered_map<double, double> m(times);

    for (double c = 0; c < times; ++c) {
        m[c] = c + 10.0;
    }
    return m;
}

int main() {
    std::chrono::high_resolution_clock::time_point start_time = std::chrono::high_resolution_clock::now();
    auto m = make_map(10000000);
    std::chrono::high_resolution_clock::time_point end_time = std::chrono::high_resolution_clock::now();
    auto elapsed = std::chrono::duration_cast<std::chrono::nanoseconds>(end_time-start_time);
    std::cout << elapsed.count()/1000000000. << "s\n";
    std::cout << m[10] << "\n"
              << m[9999999] << "\n";    
}

% g++ -DNDEBUG -std=c++17 -Ofast -o perf perf.cpp
% ./perf
2.81886s
20
1e+07

Slightly modified go version:

package main

import (
    "fmt"
    "time"
)

func make_map(elem float64) map[float64]float64 {
    m := make(map[float64]float64, int(elem))
    var i float64 = 0
    for ; i < elem; i++ {
        m[i] = i + 10
    }
    return m
}

func main() {
    start_time := time.Now()
    r := make_map(10000000)
    end_time := time.Now()
    fmt.Println(end_time.Sub(start_time))
    fmt.Println(r[10])
    fmt.Println(r[9999999])
}

% go build -a perf.go
% ./perf
1.967707381s
20
1.0000009e+07

It doesn't look like a tie as it did before the update. One thing slowing the cpp version down is the default hashing function for double. When replacing it with a really bad (but fast) hasher, I got the time down to 1.89489s.

struct bad_hasher {
    size_t operator()(const double& d) const {
        static_assert(sizeof(double)==sizeof(size_t));

        return
            *reinterpret_cast<const size_t*>( reinterpret_cast<const std::byte*>(&d) );
    }
};
  • Wow! Got the tie too. Would you mind to explain me why reserve is making it so performant compared to the version without it? – mrclx Feb 12 at 20:06
  • Ok I got it, basically the hashmap was allocating memory everytime, while with reserve I allocate it once until it gets full again. – mrclx Feb 12 at 20:15
  • :) Great! It reserves the number of buckets needed in one go instead of having to allocate more and more as the program runs. std::unordered_map::reserve I guess you could run it without reserve and track bucket_count to see how many calls it needs to do to allocate new buckets. – Ted Lyngmo Feb 12 at 20:16
  • @TedLyngmo: Apples and oranges. – peterSO Feb 12 at 20:44
  • Indeed. It was the first go code I saw, wrote and compiled. I should have guessed it also had some optimizing option :-) – Ted Lyngmo Feb 12 at 21:01
3

It's a bit hard to pin down "the speed of C++" (for almost any particular thing) because it can depend on quite a few variables, such as the compiler you use. For example, I'm typically seeing a difference of 2:1 or so between gcc and msvc for the C++ version of this code.

As far as differences between C++ and Go, I'd guess it's mostly down to differences in how the hash tables are implemented. One obvious point is that Go's map implementation allocates data space in blocks of 8 elements at a time. At least the standard library implementations I've seen, std::unordered_map places only one item per block.

We'd expect this to mean that in a typical case, the C++ code will do much larger number of individual allocations from the heap/free store, so its speed will depend much more heavily on the speed of the heap manager. The Go version should also have a substantially higher locality of reference so it makes better user of the cache.

Given those differences, I'm a little surprised that you're only seeing a 10:1 difference. My immediate guess would have been (somewhat) higher than that--but as we all know, one measurement is worth more than 100 guesses.

Reference

Go's Map Implementation

liststdc++ unordered_map

libc++ unordered_map

1

Meaningless microbenchmarks produce meaningless results.


Continuing @mrclx's and @TedLyngmo's microbenchmark thread, fix the bug in @TedLyngmo's Go microbenchmark:

perf.go:

package main

import (
    "fmt"
    "time"
)

func makeMap(elem float64) time.Duration {
    x := time.Now()
    o := make(map[float64]float64, int(elem))
    var i float64 = 0
    for ; i < elem; i++ {
        o[i] = i + 10
    }
    t := time.Now()
    return t.Sub(x)
}

func main() {
    r := makeMap(10000000)
    fmt.Println(r)
}

Output:

$ go version
go version devel +11af353531 Tue Feb 12 14:48:26 2019 +0000 linux/amd64
$ go build -a perf.go
$ ./perf
1.649880112s
$ 

perf.cpp:

#include <iostream>
#include <unordered_map>
#include <chrono>

void make_map(double times) {
    std::unordered_map<double, double> hm;
    hm.reserve(static_cast<size_t>(times)); // <- good stuff

    for (double c = 0; c < times; ++c) {
        hm[c] = c + 10.0;
    }
}

int main() {
    std::chrono::high_resolution_clock::time_point start_time = std::chrono::high_resolution_clock::now();
    make_map(10000000);
    std::chrono::high_resolution_clock::time_point end_time = std::chrono::high_resolution_clock::now();
    auto elapsed = std::chrono::duration_cast<std::chrono::nanoseconds>(end_time-start_time);
    std::cout << elapsed.count()/1000000000. << "s\n";
}

Output:

$ g++ --version
g++ (Ubuntu 8.2.0-7ubuntu1) 8.2.0
$ g++ -DNDEBUG -std=c++17 -Ofast -o perf perf.cpp
$ ./perf
3.09203s
$ 

Go leads!

  • I wish someone would come and get some major optimization for the CPP code.. I'm really curious honestly... – mrclx Feb 12 at 23:14
  • I updated my measurement to try to measure the same things and at the same places in both go and cpp. – Ted Lyngmo Feb 13 at 7:59

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.