-1

Problem statement

I am trying to secure a RESTful API via SpringSecurity and by using Basic Authentication

What I want to achieve is kind of like having a login page for my REST API.

REST API details

I have the following sets of end-points:

1) /auth - this is the end-point where the user must login. This must be done by sending a basic auth request to this endpoint with the username and password HTTP headers.

In response - the server will send a cookie the client must use in order to access the functionality of other endpoints.

2) /api/** - these are the RESTful API endpoints which provide the application functionality. The user must NOT be able to use basic auth authenticate on these end-points.

This means that if the user send correct authentication headers to these endpoints - the request will still be rejected.

The user must be able to access these endpoints if and only if he has previously authenticated himself via the /auth endpoint and has received a cookie. Having this cookie must be the only way to access these endpoints.

Current solution and its drawbacks

Here is my current configuration of the HttpSecurity object

 http
   .csrf().disable()
   .authorizeRequests()
     .antMatchers("/api/auth").permitAll()
     .antMatchers("/api/**").hasRole("USER")
     .anyRequest().authenticated()
   .and()
     .httpBasic()
     .authenticationEntryPoint(authenticationEntryPoint)
   .and()
     .requestCache()
     .requestCache( new NullRequestCache() )
   .and()
     .logout()
     .clearAuthentication(true)
     .invalidateHttpSession(true);

The problem is that it allows users to authenticate on the /api/** endpoints.

One potential solution would be to use the .formLogin() method and configure a specific login page ( section 3.3 of this tutorial - https://www.baeldung.com/securing-a-restful-web-service-with-spring-security )

This, however, bring another problem - security, in order to login in such a way - the user must perform the query like this ...

curl -i -X POST -d username=user -d password=userPass 
-c /opt/cookies.txt 
http://localhost:8080/spring-security-rest/login 

This will require him to send the login and password to the server in an unencrypted form.

One potential solution would be to use HTTPS ( like shown in this tutorial https://www.baeldung.com/spring-channel-security-https ), however this guide only covers web-pages and not REST apis.

What is the best solution in this situation ?

put on hold as primarily opinion-based by dur, eyllanesc, AdrianHHH, TylerH, ekad Feb 16 at 22:57

Many good questions generate some degree of opinion based on expert experience, but answers to this question will tend to be almost entirely based on opinions, rather than facts, references, or specific expertise. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

0

I think the best solution is to create 2 filter chains that are each configured for what you need them to do.

For example: that would mean that the API filter chain, only allows API authentication (maybe tokens) and the rest only allows httpBasic (and not tokens)

Please be advised, this answer is accompanied by a complete and working OSS sample

The idea behind two filter chains is that each filter chain handles it's own set of of endpoints. The high level gist is:


    @Order(1)
    public static class ApiSecurity extends WebSecurityConfigurerAdapter {
        @Override
        protected void configure(HttpSecurity http) throws Exception {
            //configure API authentication here
        }
    }

    @Order(2)
    public static class WebSecurity extends WebSecurityConfigurerAdapter {
        @Override
        protected void configure(HttpSecurity http) throws Exception {
            //configure browser authentication here
        }
    }

By default, your filter chain maps to /**. So when you configure the default

    @EnableWebSecurity
    public class SomeSecurity extends WebSecurityConfigurerAdapter {
        @Override
        protected void configure(HttpSecurity http) throws Exception {
            //this configures /**
        }
    }

you end up with the /** URL pattern. You can control what URLs a filter chain actually parses, like this

    @EnableWebSecurity
    public class ApiSecurity extends WebSecurityConfigurerAdapter {
        @Override
        protected void configure(HttpSecurity http) throws Exception {
            //this configures /api/**
            http.mvcMatcher("/api/**");
        }
    }

When you do this, you have to remember that ordering your filter chains becomes extremely important. Imagine if you have two filter chains

  1. /** - all your browser endpoints
  2. /api/** - all your API endpoints

If the browser filter chain comes first it will also trap all your /api/** requests because they match the any requests matcher of /**.

So we use the @Order annotation.

Let's expand on our example

@EnableWebSecurity
public class SecurityConfig {
        //generic beans go here

    @Configuration
    @Order(1)
    public static class ApiSecurity extends WebSecurityConfigurerAdapter {
        @Override
        protected void configure(HttpSecurity http) throws Exception {
            http.mvcMatcher("/api/**");
        }
    }

    @Configuration
    @Order(2)
    public static class WebSecurity extends WebSecurityConfigurerAdapter {
        @Override
        protected void configure(HttpSecurity http) throws Exception {
            http.mvcMatcher("/**"); //this is redundant, same as default
        }
    }
}

All you have to do now is configure each filter chain for your authentication methods.

The API Security Filter Chain

    @Configuration
    @Order(1)
    public static class ApiSecurity extends WebSecurityConfigurerAdapter {
        @Override
        protected void configure(HttpSecurity http) throws Exception {
            http
                .mvcMatcher("/api/**") //only intercept these URLs
                .authorizeRequests()
                    .anyRequest().hasAnyAuthority("ADMIN","API_KEY")
                    .and()
                .addFilterAfter(new ApiKeyFilter(), HeaderWriterFilter.class)
                .sessionManagement().disable()
            ;
        }
    }

The Browser Endpoints (or everything else /**)

    @Configuration
    @Order(2)
    public static class WebSecurity extends WebSecurityConfigurerAdapter {
        @Override
        protected void configure(HttpSecurity http) throws Exception {
            http
                .authorizeRequests()
                    .anyRequest().hasAnyRole("ADMIN","USER")
                    .and()
                .httpBasic()
                    .and()
                .formLogin()
            ;
        }
    }

As you can see, the ApiSecurity filter chain does not have httpBasic.

Nothing is complete without a test case:

    @Test
    @DisplayName("user / 123 accessing /api using basic authentication")
    void userBasicTriesToAccessApi() throws Exception {
        mvc.perform(
            get("/api/test")
                .header("Authorization", "Basic " + Base64.encodeBase64String("user:123".getBytes()))
        )
            .andExpect(status().isForbidden())
            .andExpect(unauthenticated())
        ;
    }

    @Test
    @DisplayName("accessing /api using token")
    void api() throws Exception {
        mvc.perform(
            get("/api/test")
                .header("Authorization", "ApiKey this-is-a-valid-key")
        )
            .andExpect(status().isOk())
            .andExpect(authenticated()
                .withAuthorities(
                    asList(
                        new SimpleGrantedAuthority("API_KEY"),
                        new SimpleGrantedAuthority("ADMIN")
                    )
                )
            )
            .andExpect(content().string(containsString("API INVOKED")))
        ;
    }

To Spring Security, authentication and authorization are two separate events.

  1. Authentication - prove your identity (token, http-basic, etc)
  2. Authorization - are you allowed to access the resource, typically based on authority

If you truly want to separate http-basic vs api-auth, you would ensure that the authentication object from httpBasic() would have a role called http-basic and the authentication object from api-auth, would have another role.

You can then use that role during authorization to ensure there is no cross contamination.

For example: /api should only be accessible if there is an authority named API_KEY. We can use an expression to do this:

 .anyRequest()
  .access(
     "hasAnyAuthority('ADMIN','USER') and hasAuthority('API_KEY')"
  )

The OSS sample contains this expression:

            http
                .mvcMatcher("/api/**")
                .authorizeRequests()
                    .anyRequest().access("hasAnyAuthority('ADMIN','USER') and hasAuthority('API_KEY')")
                    .and()
                .addFilterAfter(new ApiKeyFilter(), HeaderWriterFilter.class)
                .sessionManagement().disable()
            ;

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