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I have these controller methods

def student_progress_variables(student_email)
    dashboard = Dashboard.new
    @projects = Thread.new { dashboard.obtain_projects }

    @current_student = obtain_student_with_email(student_email)

    @reviews = obtain_selected_student_project_reviews(@current_student)
    @requests = obtain_student_code_review_requests(@current_student).sort_by do |request|
      request[obtain_code_review_requests_id]
    end

    @review_completions = obtain_student_code_review_completions(@current_student)
    @courses = obtain_projects_courses(@projects.join)
  end

I want to pass the response of @projects to the @courses method call but I keep getting this undefined method 'each' for #<Thread:0x00007f30dc83da10> error. I have read the documentation but cannot make any headway. Any ideas?

EDIT: I went with @max pleaner's suggestion. Here is the current status of the snippet. I am already seeing better results:

def student_progress_variables(student_email)
    thread1 = Thread.new do 
      @current_student = obtain_student_with_email(student_email)
    end
    thread2 = Thread.new do 
      dashboard = Dashboard.new
      @projects = dashboard.obtain_projects
      @courses = obtain_projects_courses(@projects)
    end
    thread1.join

    thread3 = Thread.new do 
      @reviews = obtain_selected_student_project_reviews(@current_student)
    end

    @requests = obtain_student_code_review_requests(@current_student).sort_by do |request|
      request[obtain_code_review_requests_id]
    end
    @review_completions = obtain_student_code_review_completions(@current_student)
    thread2.join
    thread3.join
  end
  • 1
    Are you sure dashboard.obtain_projects is returning something? – hashrocket Feb 12 at 20:32
  • Yes the object method returns a record. – uzorjchibuzor Feb 13 at 5:57
1

Threads don't have return values (except the Thread object itself).

This is a really common issue in javascript, where you use many async functions (such as setTimeout) that don't produce return values in the same way that synchronous functions do.

What Javascript typically uses to deal with this problem are callbacks (as well as promises/async/await). You can use callbacks in ruby in the form of blocks:

  class AsyncClass
    attr_reader :foo, :bar
    def async_method(&callback)
      Thread.new do
        @foo = 1
        @bar = @foo + 1
        callback.call(self)
      end
    end
  end

Although you can call join on any thread to halt the code execution until it completes, this kind of removes the purpose of using a thread altogether (unless you are doing parallel processing). So, any method that calls async_method will need to be asynchronous itself.

This won't work in something like a controller action, which is synchronous (unless you are using a streaming response or server-push, but I'll assume you're not).

It's sort of a 'law' of async code that you cannot call an async function from a synchronous one, and get the 'return value', without calling join (and forcing it to run synchronously). So whenever you want the 'return value' of an async function, you need to make the caller function async, and use a block/callback to read the result. Note that this annoying process is sometimes called 'callback hell' in javascript and is why they implemented promises/async/await (which, by the way, seem to be supported by the ruby-concurrency gem).

But, say you were calling this method from another async method:

  class OtherClass
    def initialize
      AsyncClass.new.async_method do |async_class_inst|
        puts async_class_inst.bar
      end
      sleep 1
    end
  end

  OtherClass.new
  # prints 2

In your case it would look like this:

  def student_progress_variables(student_email, &blk)
    dashboard = Dashboard.new
    Thread.new do
      @projects = dashboard.obtain_projects
      @current_student = obtain_student_with_email(student_email)

      @reviews = obtain_selected_student_project_reviews(@current_student)
      @requests = obtain_student_code_review_requests(@current_student).sort_by do |request|
        request[obtain_code_review_requests_id]
      end

      @review_completions = obtain_student_code_review_completions(@current_student)
      @courses = obtain_projects_courses(@projects.join)
      blk.call(self)
    end
  end

But, again, you can only call this from another async method:

  class AsyncCaller
    def initialize(&callback)
      SomeClass.new.student_progress_variables("student@email.com") do |some_class_inst|
        callback.call(self, some_class_inst)
      end
      sleep 1
    end
  end

  AsyncCaller.new do |async_caller_inst, some_class_inst|
    # .... do things here, thread is done
  end

Note that in these examples, I'm passing self to the callback, so that it gets assigned to a block variable (e.g. async_class_inst). This is because the value of self changes depending on where you call the block from, as you can see in this example:

  class A
    def initialize(&blk)
      blk.call
      sleep 1 
    end
  end

  A.new { puts self }
  # prints 'main'

So, if you're making some manipulation on self in the thread (as you are, by setting instance variables), it's good practice to explicitly pass self to the callback/block, so you don't have to assume that the caller has access to it otherwise.

Also, please don't actually put sleep calls in your code, I'm only using these so if you run the snippets as scripts it will work. In actual code, you should use Thread#join if you want to wait until a thread is finished.

To reiterate, you should not use threads in your controller actions if you expect to get the results in time to include in the response (unless you are doing parallel processing with .join at the end).

  • What of if I want to use the .join method because I am running the methods in a controller. ? – uzorjchibuzor Feb 13 at 6:13
  • @uzorjchibuzor you can do this. But then, why use a thread at all? – max pleaner Feb 13 at 8:56
  • I needed to make API calls in a not serial manner, so that a call will not be dependent on when the response for another call arrives. I am seeing a good result for the join appoint. I am going to mark the first answer, it helped. – uzorjchibuzor Feb 13 at 9:25

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