0

My aim is to multiply all values in a text file with a number. In my case it is 1000.

Original text in file:

0.00493293814
0.0438981727
0.149746656
0.443125129
0.882018387
0.975789607
0.995755374
1

I want the output to look like: (so, changing the contents of the file to...)

4.93293814
43.8981727
149.746656
443.125129
882.018387
975.789607
995.755374
1000

Or even rather:

4.9
43.8
149.7
443.1
882.0
975.7
995.7
1000

I am using bash on macOS in the terminal.

  • note that 975.78 is closer to 975.8, you may want to round the numbers instead of truncating. – karakfa Feb 12 at 21:08
  • What DO you want done wrt rounding? rounded up or down or unbiased or truncated or something else or do you really not care? – Ed Morton Feb 12 at 21:18
  • Is 1000 fixed (make it a string operation moving the dot after adding some 0) ? – Walter A Feb 12 at 22:51
  • 1
    If one of the answers here resolved your question please accept that answer. Accepting an answer closes this questions and rewards the author of the accepted answer. If your question was not resolved consider explaining why. – Socowi Feb 15 at 12:07
0

Use sed to prefix each line with 1000*, then process the resulting mathematical expressions with bc. To show only the first digit after the decimal point you can use sed again.

sed 's/^/1000*/' yourFile | bc | sed -E 's/(.*\..).*/\1/'

This will print the latter of your expected outputs. Just as you wanted, decimals are cut rather than rounded (1.36 is converted to 1.3).

To remove all decimal digits either replace the last … | sed … with sed -E 's/\..*//' or use the following command

sed 's:^.*$:1000*&/1:' yourFile | bc

With these commands overwriting the file directly is not possible. You have to write to a temporary file (append > tmp && mv tmp yourFile) or use the sponge command from the package moreutils (append | sponge yourFile).

However, if you want to remove all decimal points after the multiplication there is a trick. Instead of actually multiplying by 1000 we can syntactically shift the decimal point. This can be done in one single sed command. sed has the -i option to overwrite input files.

sed -i.bak -E 's/\..*/&000/;s/^[^.]*$/&.000/;s/\.(...).*/\1/;s/^(-?)0*(.)/\1\2/' yourFile

The command changes yourFile's content to

4
43
149
443
882
975
995
1000

A backup yourFile.bak of the original is created.

The single sed command should work with every input number format too (even for things like -.1-100).

  • Used sed before and this one is working, except for it not destructively writing over the file. While I´d want that for some files, the current need is only to wrangle the numbers. This one did that perfectly. Is there a way to get rid of all of the decimals and the "." (dot) as well? – andyNilson Feb 13 at 3:47
  • @andyNilson I edited my answer. – Socowi Feb 13 at 7:14
  • Re "overwrite ... not possible": with GNU sed's evaluate command it can be done like sed -i 's/.*/'"dc -e '1000 & * p'"'/e' yourFile. It's more inefficient, (using a separate instance of dc for each line), but doesn't require sponge. – agc Feb 13 at 8:12
  • @agc good to know. However OP is using mac os which does not come with GNU sed. – Socowi Feb 13 at 8:17
  • @Socowi, True, but gsed can be had should that seem necessary. See How to use GNU sed on Mac OS X – agc Feb 13 at 10:11
2

If you have dc :

cat infile | dc -f - -e '1k1000sa[la*Sdz0!=Z]sZzsclZx[Ld1/psblcd1-sc1<Y]sYlYx'
  • Have my vote for maddest answer I've seen in 5 years on Stack Overflow! – Mark Setchell Feb 12 at 21:44
  • in this particular case can't beat doing the computation by hand though! – karakfa Feb 12 at 22:58
2

Using Perl

perl -lpe ' $_=$_*1000 '

with inputs and inline replacing

$ cat andy.txt
0.00493293814
0.0438981727
0.149746656
0.443125129
0.882018387
0.975789607
0.995755374
1

$ perl -i -lpe ' $_=$_*1000 ' andy.txt

$ cat andy.txt
4.93293814
43.8981727
149.746656
443.125129
882.018387
975.789607
995.755374
1000

$

One decimal place

perl -lpe ' $_=sprintf("%0.1f",$_*1000 ) '

Zero decimal place and rounding off

perl -lpe ' $_=sprintf("%0.0f",$_*1000 ) '

Zero decimal place and Truncating

perl  -lpe ' $_=sprintf("%0.0f",int($_*1000) ) ' 
  • Perfect and concise. Works well. How would I go about having one decimal or none at all? – andyNilson Feb 13 at 3:52
  • for one decimal perl -lpe ' $_=sprintf("%0.1f",$_*1000 ) ' – stack0114106 Feb 13 at 3:54
  • for no decimal perl -lpe ' $_=sprintf("%0.0f",$_*1000 ) ' andy.txt.. note that it rounds off – stack0114106 Feb 13 at 3:56
  • perl -lpe ' $_=sprintf("%0.0f",int($_*1000) ) ' for truncating.. added all of them to the answer – stack0114106 Feb 13 at 4:01
1

awk to the rescue!

$ awk '{printf "%.1f\n", $1*1000}' file > tmp && mv tmp file
1

Using num-utils. For answers to 8 decimal places:

numprocess '/*1000/' n.txt

For rounded answers to 1 decimal place:

numprocess '/*1000/' n.txt | numround -n '.1'

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