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The question title isn't perfect, but it's the most generic way I can explain my problem. I have a function that "evaluates" a logical equation. It looks like this:

(defun evaluate (f)
  (let ((VARS (variables-in-list f)))
    (if (endp VARS)
      (evalutate-boolean-eq f)
      (or (evaluate (substitute f (first VARS) t))
          (evaluate (substitute (first VARS) nil))))))

The function will take a list that is essentially a boolean equation with variables in it, such as '(x & y) or '((~x) & y) and see if there is any way the boolean expression can be true by replacing the variables in it with t and nil and evaulating the expression. So, if we pass '(x & y) to this function, it will do a couple of things:

  1. It will first use variables-in-list to extract all the variables in the list. VARS will equal '(x y).

  2. It will then substitute the first variable in the list with t, pass it to the evaluate function, then do the same thing but with nil. This will result in two evaluate functions with f= '(t & y) for the first, and f = '(nil & y) for the second.

  3. It will get all the vars again - this tile VARS will only be equal to '(y). It will repeat step 2 for the two different f equations, resulting in '(t & t), '(t & nil), '(nil & t), '(nil & nil).

  4. Since VARS on the third iteration is empty (there are no more var in f), I run an evaluate-boolean-eq function, which will evaluate the purely boolean equation and return true or false.

This is just an example - as far as I can tell, if the formula isn't too large, this runs okay. What I want to do now though is track the substitutions that were made and return them from my evaluate function. I want to know which variables were changed into what boolean so that the function can be evaluated to true.

So, for our '(x & y) example, I'd like to return something like '((x t) (y t)). Is this possible within this function? I've spent a long time trying to tinker around but I haven't been able to figure out how it would be done in lisp.

Alternatively, since it doesn't seem like it might be quite possible to do something this complex in one function, I would like to just return the list of booleans in f. When (endp VARS) evaluates to true, I would like to (evaluate-boolean-eq f) and if it was true, return either just f or all the booleans in f. I just can't figure out how to even only return f with the way this is structured right now. How can I return the end-result of f (after all the substitutions and all?)

Any help would be appreciated, thank you

  • 1
    Instead of substituting values into the expression, it would be easier to have an (EVALUATE expression environment) function that takes an expression containing variables and an environment containing the variable -> value mapping (an alist is a good choice here). Then you can just generate all possible environments and try evaluating the expression with them (this is why an alist is good; it's easy to recursively build the environment and backtrack after trying it). – jkiiski Feb 13 at 8:03
3

How about this:

(defun evaluate (f)
  "(evaluate F) returns values SAT, ASSIGNMENTS, where SAT is T iff F is satisfiable,
and ASSIGNMENTS, is an alist of (VAR . VAL) to satisfy F"
  (let ((VARS (variables-in-list f)))
    (if (endp VARS)
      (values (evalutate-boolean-eq f) nil)
      (multiple-value-bind (sat assign) (evaluate (substitute f (first vars) t)
        (if sat
            (values t (acons (first vars) t assign))
            (multiple-value-bind (sat assign) (evaluate (substitute f (first vars) nil)
              (if sat
                  (values t (acons (first vars) nil assign))
                  (values nil nil))))))))

This is still pretty bad for a naive implementation because it has no way to short-circuit failures. E.g. for an expression like:

((x & ~x) & (y1 | ... | y10))

You will need to do 2048 evaluations to show this is unsat

1

If the goal is to keep the arguments of the evaluate function as they are, i.e. not to add the environment like @jkiiski suggested, maybe the following can work for you.

Since you need to "track" the state of the current path across all the evaluate recursive calls, you can have the intuition that you need a memory "around" the evaluate function.

Namely, you need an object or at least a closure for that. Since I do not know your exact need (e.g. the design of your software), I will go with the second. Here is a simplified case of yours :

(let ((r ())
      (temp ()))
  (defun my-let-test (list)
    (format t "temp: ~a~%" temp)
    (if (endp list)
      (progn
        (push temp r) ;; add to the result variable.
        (setf temp ())) ;; clear the temp variable.
      (progn
        (setf temp (append temp `(,(car list)))) ;; add the element at the end of the temp variable.
        (my-let-test (cdr list)))))

  (my-let-test '(a b c d))
  (my-let-test '(a b c))
  r)

Executing the let form outputs :

temp: NIL
temp: (A)
temp: (A B)
temp: (A B C)
temp: (A B C D)
temp: NIL
temp: (A)
temp: (A B)
temp: (A B C)

And returns : ((A B C) (A B C D)), i.e. the value stored in r lexical variable.

The line (setf temp ())) is the most important, if you forget to clear the temp variable you would get a concatenated result in r like ((A B C D A B C) (A B C D)). However, it is not very satisfying that r contains the result for both calls too. Since you need a r and a temp variable for each call, you need again a "higher step" :

(defun my-new-let-test (list)
  (let ((r ())
        (temp ()))
    (labels ((my-local-let-test (list)
           (format t "temp: ~a~%" temp)
           (if (endp list)
             (progn
               (push temp r)
               (setf temp ()))
             (progn
               (setf temp (append temp `(,(car list))))
               (my-local-let-test (cdr list))))))
      (my-local-let-test list))
    r))

(my-new-let-test '(a b c d))
(my-new-let-test '(a b c))

I simply put the code of the my-let-test function in the my-local-let-test, in a labels form since it is a recursive function.

The first call to my-new-let-test outputs :

temp: NIL
temp: (A)
temp: (A B)
temp: (A B C)
temp: (A B C D)

And returns ((A B C D)). The second call outputs :

temp: NIL
temp: (A)
temp: (A B)
temp: (A B C)

And returns ((A B C)).

Note that the form :

(progn
  (push temp r)
  (setf temp ()))

Can be rewritten : (push temp r) since you do not need to clear the temp variable anymore (because it is unique to each call).


However, it does not account the fact that with this code, you cannot do "conditional branching" like you do in your code (for boolean substitution), for instance something like :

(if (some condition)
    (my-local-let-test arg1)
    (my-local-let-test arg2))

You have to use a stack to deal with this kind of problem.

As an exercise, let us try to do the following : Get all the elements separated by a number (there is at least one letter between two numbers).

For instance :

  • (A B C D E F) returns ((A B C D E F)),
  • (A B 5 C D 6 E F 7) returns ((A B 5) (C D 6) (E F 7)),
  • (A B 5 C D 6 E F 7 G) returns ((A B 5) (C D 6) (E F 7) (G)),
  • etc.

Here is a solution :

(defun my-new-let-test (list)
  (let ((r '())
        (temp '(()))) ;; here temp is a list containing an empty list.
    (labels ((my-local-let-test (list)
           (format t "temp: ~a~%" temp)
           (if (endp list)
               (push (pop temp) r) ;; pop the stack
               (progn
                 ;; /!\ See explanations below. /!\
                 (if (null (first temp))
                     (setf temp `((,(car list))))
                     (setf (first temp) (append (first temp) `(,(car list)))))
                 ;; /!\ End of warning. /!\
                 (if (numberp (car list))
                     (progn
                       (push (pop temp) r) ;; pop the stack
                       (when (cdr list)
                         (push '() temp) ;; push the stack
                     (my-local-let-test (cdr list))))
                 (my-local-let-test (cdr list)))))))
      (my-local-let-test list))
    (reverse r)))

Output for (my-new-let-test '(A B 5 C D 6 E F 7 G)) :

temp: (NIL)
temp: ((A))
temp: ((A B))
temp: (NIL)
temp: ((C))
temp: ((C D))
temp: (NIL)
temp: ((E))
temp: ((E F))
temp: (NIL)
temp: ((G))

About the warning : You can produce a strange "bug" if you do something like this :

(defun my-new-let-test (list)
  (let ((temp '(())))
    (format t "temp: ~a~%~%" temp)
    ((lambda (list)
       (setf temp `(,(car list))))
     list)
    (format t "===========~%")))

(my-new-let-test '(a b c d e)) ;; Execute this form twice.

It should outputs (NIL) the first time and ((A)) the second time; because the temp variable is not cleared (the setf on (())) is the problem). In a real code, you should do a test like this to avoid this :

(if (null (first temp))
  (setf temp `(,(car list)))
  (push (car list) (first temp)))

The REPL (SBCL) shows a warning on the example, but not on the code of the exercise.


Solution for your problem (I could not test it, but it must be something like this), according to the explanations above :

(defun evaluate (f)
  (let ((r ())
        (temp '(())))
    (labels ((local-evaluate (f)
       (let ((VARS (variables-in-list f)))
         (if (endp VARS)
             (when (evaluate-boolean-eq f)
               (push temp r)) ;; save the result
             (progn
               ;;; Replace by T.
               (if (null (first temp)) ;; Warning from above.
                 (setf temp `(,@(first temps) T)) ;; push the stack
                 (push `(,@(first temps) T) temp)) ;; push the stack
               (local-evaluate (substitute f (first VARS) T))
               (pop temp) ;; pop the stack
               ;;; Replace by NIL.
               (if (null (first temp)) ;; Warning from above.
                 (setf temp `(,@(first temps) NIL)) ;; push the stack
                 (push `(,@(first temps) NIL) temp)) ;; push the stack
               (local-evaluate (substitute (first VARS) NIL))
               (pop temp) ;; pop the stack
               )))))
      (local-evaluate f))
    r))

Notes :

  • I strongly recommend to unit test your code if it is not the case.
  • You can use binary trees.
  • You could transform your logical expression using the Polish notation : https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Polish_notation , and then convert your & to and, your ~ to not, etc.; then use eval on your code to parse it as Lisp.
  • This notation could help you to "short-circuit" failures, as @Dan Robertson suggested.

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