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I have a headless EGL renderer in c++ for Linux that I have wrapped with bindings to use in Swift. It works great – I can render in parallel creating multiple contexts and rendering in separate threads, but I've run into a weird issue. First of all I have wrapped all GL calls specific to a renderer and it's context inside it's own serial queue like below.

func draw(data:Any) -> results {
  serial.sync {
    //All rendering code for this renderer is wrapped in a unique serial queue.
    bindGLContext()
    draw()
  }
}

To batch data between renderers I used DispatchQueue.concurrentPerform. It works correctly, but when I try creating a concurrent queue with a DispatchGroup something weird happens. Even though I have wrapped all GL calls in serial queues the GL contexts get messed up and all gl calls fail to allocate textures/buffers/etc.

So I am trying to understand the difference between these two and why one works and the other doesn't. Any ideas would be great!

//This works
DispatchQueue.concurrentPerform(iterations: renderers.count) { j in
  let batch = batches[j]
  let renderer = renderers[j]
  let _ = renderer.draw(data:batch)
}
//This fails – specifically GL calls fail
let group = DispatchGroup()
let q = DispatchQueue(label: "queue.concurrent", attributes: .concurrent)
for (j, renderer) in renderers.enumerated() {
   q.async(group: group) {
     let batch = batches[j]
     let _ = renderer.draw(data:batch)
   }
}
group.wait()
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Edit:

I would make sure the OpenGL wrapper is actually thread safe. Each renderer having it's own serial queue may not help if the multiple renderers are making OpenGL calls simultaneously. It's possible the DispatchQueue.concurrentPerform version works because it is just running serially.

Original answer:

I suspect the OpenGL failures have to do with hitting memory constraints. When you dispatch many tasks to a concurrent queue, GCD doesn't do anything clever to rate-limit the number of tasks that are started. If a bunch of running tasks are blocked doing IO, it may just start more and more tasks before any of them finish, gobbling up more and more memory. Here's a detailed write-up from Mike Ash about the problem.

I would guess that DispatchQueue.concurrentPerform works because it has some kind of extra logic internally to avoid spawning too many threads, though it's not well documented and there may be platform-specific stuff happening here. I'm not sure why the function would even exist if all it was doing was dispatching to a concurrent queue.

If you want to dispatch a large number of items directly to a DispatchQueue, especially if those items have some non-CPU-bound component to them, you need to add some extra logic yourself to limit the number of tasks that get started. Here's an example from Soroush Khanlou's GCD Handbook:

class LimitedWorker {
    private let serialQueue = DispatchQueue(label: "com.khanlou.serial.queue")
    private let concurrentQueue = DispatchQueue(label: "com.khanlou.concurrent.queue", attributes: .concurrent)
    private let semaphore: DispatchSemaphore

    init(limit: Int) {
        semaphore = DispatchSemaphore(value: limit)
    }

    func enqueue(task: @escaping () -> ()) {
        serialQueue.async(execute: {
            self.semaphore.wait()
            self.concurrentQueue.async(execute: {
                task()
                self.semaphore.signal()
            })
        })
    }
}

It uses a sempahore to limit the number of concurrent tasks that are executing on the concurrent queue, and uses a serial queue to feed new tasks to the concurrent queue. Newly enqueued tasks block at self.semaphore.wait() if the maximum number of tasks are already scheduled on the concurrent queue.

You would use it like this:

let group = DispatchGroup()
let q = LimitedWorker(limit: 10) // Experiment with this number
for (j, renderer) in renderers.enumerated() {
   group.enter()
   q.enqueue {
     let batch = batches[j]
     let _ = renderer.draw(data:batch)

     group.leave()
   }
}
group.wait()
| improve this answer | |
  • Thanks for your response. Your edited answer about threading was also my hunch too. I forgot to mention that I had limited the amount of renderers to 5 to limit GPU memory usage. But I wonder if the underlying implementation of GCD on linux has any effect. I am stuck at this point so I think I am going to just switch to Vulkan. It seems better suited for handling use cases like this. – teals Feb 21 '19 at 19:16

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