81

Does any one know how do I get the current open windows or process of a local machine using Java?

What I'm trying to do is: list the current open task, windows or process open, like in Windows Taskmanager, but using a multi-platform approach - using only Java if it's possible.

12 Answers 12

89

This is another approach to parse the the process list from the command "ps -e":

try {
    String line;
    Process p = Runtime.getRuntime().exec("ps -e");
    BufferedReader input =
            new BufferedReader(new InputStreamReader(p.getInputStream()));
    while ((line = input.readLine()) != null) {
        System.out.println(line); //<-- Parse data here.
    }
    input.close();
} catch (Exception err) {
    err.printStackTrace();
}

If you are using Windows, then you should change the line: "Process p = Runtime.getRun..." etc... (3rd line), for one that looks like this:

Process p = Runtime.getRuntime().exec
    (System.getenv("windir") +"\\system32\\"+"tasklist.exe");

Hope the info helps!

  • how to get the process start time and end time – Bucks Sep 11 '12 at 9:27
  • 31
    On Windows, run tasklist.exe /fo csv /nh to get the list in CSV format, that's much easier to parse. – Emmanuel Bourg Jan 24 '13 at 15:31
  • but it is not showing the jar name. My executable jar name is helloDemo.jar. but it is not showing anything for it – Sumon Bappi May 2 '15 at 10:57
  • Why wouldn't it work if I add a | grep java ? i.e. ps -elf | grep java won't return a thing, but ps -elf would work as expected. – Itay Moav -Malimovka May 2 '16 at 20:28
  • It should be noted that the "windows specific" bit at the bottom appears to be unnecessary. On Windows 10, (.exec (Runtime/getRuntime) "tasklist")) (in Clojure, using Java-interop) correctly returns the tasklist process, even without specifying a directory. – Carcigenicate Jan 9 '17 at 18:25
23

On Windows there is an alternative using JNA:

import com.sun.jna.Native;
import com.sun.jna.platform.win32.*;
import com.sun.jna.win32.W32APIOptions;

public class ProcessList {

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        WinNT winNT = (WinNT) Native.loadLibrary(WinNT.class, W32APIOptions.UNICODE_OPTIONS);

        WinNT.HANDLE snapshot = winNT.CreateToolhelp32Snapshot(Tlhelp32.TH32CS_SNAPPROCESS, new WinDef.DWORD(0));

        Tlhelp32.PROCESSENTRY32.ByReference processEntry = new Tlhelp32.PROCESSENTRY32.ByReference();

        while (winNT.Process32Next(snapshot, processEntry)) {
            System.out.println(processEntry.th32ProcessID + "\t" + Native.toString(processEntry.szExeFile));
        }

        winNT.CloseHandle(snapshot);
    }
}
  • This only gives the command name NOT the entire command line. Is there a way to get the entire command line? – Christopher Dancy May 4 '13 at 19:31
  • 2
    You can get the full path by calling GetModuleFileName. See stackoverflow.com/questions/7521693/… for an example. – Emmanuel Bourg May 6 '13 at 8:29
  • The only problem w/ this is that it gives only the path of the process NOT the entire command line. Is there a way to get the full command line of the process (i.e. 'ant.bat -f helloWorld.ext')? – Christopher Dancy May 6 '13 at 16:31
  • how to check for a particular process like xyz.exe is running or not? – unknownbits Jul 5 '13 at 6:31
  • @ChristopherDancy not sure if you still need an answer but for completeness and and as it wasn't mentioned here either: Winodws Managment Information Command-line (or simply wmic.exe) provides a way to retrieve plenty of information of running applications - WMIC PROCESS or to restrict the output for a specific process: WMIC PROCESS WHERE name='theName'. You can use further filters to limit the output if needed. The command line is included in the CommandLine column of the table returned (= 2nd column) – Roman Vottner Jan 13 '14 at 13:51
16

Finally, with Java 9+ it is possible with ProcessHandle:

public static void main(String[] args) {
    ProcessHandle.allProcesses()
            .forEach(process -> System.out.println(processDetails(process)));
}

private static String processDetails(ProcessHandle process) {
    return String.format("%8d %8s %10s %26s %-40s",
            process.pid(),
            text(process.parent().map(ProcessHandle::pid)),
            text(process.info().user()),
            text(process.info().startInstant()),
            text(process.info().commandLine()));
}

private static String text(Optional<?> optional) {
    return optional.map(Object::toString).orElse("-");
}

Output:

    1        -       root   2017-11-19T18:01:13.100Z /sbin/init
  ...
  639     1325   www-data   2018-12-04T06:35:58.680Z /usr/sbin/apache2 -k start
  ...
23082    11054    huguesm   2018-12-04T10:24:22.100Z /.../java ProcessListDemo
  • Which imports should be added to work with ProcessHandle? – Jordi May 28 '18 at 16:35
  • 1
    That class is in java.lang so no import needed – Hugues M. May 28 '18 at 16:42
9

The only way I can think of doing it is by invoking a command line application that does the job for you and then screenscraping the output (like Linux's ps and Window's tasklist).

Unfortunately, that'll mean you'll have to write some parsing routines to read the data from both.

Process proc = Runtime.getRuntime().exec ("tasklist.exe");
InputStream procOutput = proc.getInputStream ();
if (0 == proc.waitFor ()) {
    // TODO scan the procOutput for your data
}
  • 1
    Yep,I already thought about that too, but I tough it could be done with Java only. And I think I would be better to use "ps -aux" instead of top. Thanks for the quick answer! – ramayac Sep 10 '08 at 17:04
  • On Windows, the tasklist program can be configured to output CSV :) – MauganRa Mar 10 '17 at 8:41
7

YAJSW (Yet Another Java Service Wrapper) looks like it has JNA-based implementations of its org.rzo.yajsw.os.TaskList interface for win32, linux, bsd and solaris and is under an LGPL license. I haven't tried calling this code directly, but YAJSW works really well when I've used it in the past, so you shouldn't have too many worries.

  • apparently v12+ is Apache/LGPL dual license – harschware Feb 25 '15 at 0:18
5

You can easily retrieve the list of running processes using jProcesses

List<ProcessInfo> processesList = JProcesses.getProcessList();

for (final ProcessInfo processInfo : processesList) {
    System.out.println("Process PID: " + processInfo.getPid());
    System.out.println("Process Name: " + processInfo.getName());
    System.out.println("Process Used Time: " + processInfo.getTime());
    System.out.println("Full command: " + processInfo.getCommand());
    System.out.println("------------------");
}
  • this library seems to be very slow... is there a reason for this (or is it general java + wmi interop across vbs? – Gobliins Apr 18 '16 at 12:18
  • 2
    I guess you talk about windows implementation. Yes, normally WMI queries take some time. As always it depends on the use case. If you need to perform the query every 10 ms, yes, it is too slow. – profesor_falken Apr 18 '16 at 12:27
  • yes i was talking about win, in linux i spotted the use of "ps...<options>" so i guess it should be much faster – Gobliins Apr 18 '16 at 12:35
  • Ok, if you want you can create an issue in the github project and I will eventually take a look and see if I can improve performance in Win. In fact I used it on Linux so I did not pay much attention to win implementation :-S – profesor_falken Apr 18 '16 at 12:43
  • It is fine, but what i was looking for: In your process startTime you have limited the given time for one day (hh:mm:ss) if i am not wrong. Is there any option to get also the date + time ( yyyy-mm-dd-hh:mm:ss) ? – Gobliins Apr 18 '16 at 13:49
4

There is no platform-neutral way of doing this. In the 1.6 release of Java, a "Desktop" class was added the allows portable ways of browsing, editing, mailing, opening, and printing URI's. It is possible this class may someday be extended to support processes, but I doubt it.

If you are only curious in Java processes, you can use the java.lang.management api for getting thread/memory information on the JVM.

4

For windows I use following:

        Process process = new ProcessBuilder("tasklist.exe", "/fo", "csv", "/nh").start();
    new Thread(() -> {
        Scanner sc = new Scanner(process.getInputStream());
        if (sc.hasNextLine()) sc.nextLine();
        while (sc.hasNextLine()) {
            String line = sc.nextLine();
            String[] parts = line.split(",");
            String unq = parts[0].substring(1).replaceFirst(".$", "");
            String pid = parts[1].substring(1).replaceFirst(".$", "");
            System.out.println(unq + " " + pid);
        }
    }).start();
    process.waitFor();
    System.out.println("Done");
3

Using code to parse ps aux for linux and tasklist for windows are your best options, until something more general comes along.

For windows, you can reference: http://www.rgagnon.com/javadetails/java-0593.html

Linux can pipe the results of ps aux through grep too, which would make processing/searching quick and easy. I'm sure you can find something similar for windows too.

2

This might be useful for apps with a bundled JRE: I scan for the folder name that i'm running the application from: so if you're application is executing from:

 C:\Dev\build\SomeJavaApp\jre-9.0.1\bin\javaw.exe

then you can find if it's already running in J9, by:

   public static void main(String[] args)
   {
    AtomicBoolean isRunning = new AtomicBoolean(false);
    ProcessHandle.allProcesses()
            .filter(ph -> ph.info().command().isPresent() && ph.info().command().get().contains("SomeJavaApp"))
            .forEach((process) -> {
                isRunning.set(true);
            });

    if (isRunning.get()) System.out.println("SomeJavaApp is running already");
   }
0
package com.vipul;

import java.applet.Applet;
import java.awt.Checkbox;
import java.awt.Choice;
import java.awt.Font;
import java.io.BufferedReader;
import java.io.IOException;
import java.io.InputStream;
import java.io.InputStreamReader;
import java.util.ArrayList;
import java.util.List;

public class BatchExecuteService extends Applet {
    public Choice choice;

    public void init() 
    {
        setFont(new Font("Helvetica", Font.BOLD, 36));
        choice = new Choice();
    }

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        BatchExecuteService batchExecuteService = new BatchExecuteService();
        batchExecuteService.run();
    }

    List<String> processList = new ArrayList<String>();

    public void run() {
        try {
            Runtime runtime = Runtime.getRuntime();
            Process process = runtime.exec("D:\\server.bat");
            process.getOutputStream().close();
            InputStream inputStream = process.getInputStream();
            InputStreamReader inputstreamreader = new InputStreamReader(
                    inputStream);
            BufferedReader bufferedrReader = new BufferedReader(
                    inputstreamreader);
            BufferedReader bufferedrReader1 = new BufferedReader(
                    inputstreamreader);

            String strLine = "";
            String x[]=new String[100];
            int i=0;
            int t=0;
            while ((strLine = bufferedrReader.readLine()) != null) 
            {
        //      System.out.println(strLine);
                String[] a=strLine.split(",");
                x[i++]=a[0];
            }
    //      System.out.println("Length : "+i);

            for(int j=2;j<i;j++)
            {
                System.out.println(x[j]);
            }
        }
        catch (IOException ioException) 
        {
            ioException.printStackTrace();
        }

    }
}
   You can create batch file like 

TASKLIST /v /FI "STATUS eq running" /FO "CSV" /FI "Username eq LHPL002\soft" /FI "MEMUSAGE gt 10000" /FI "Windowtitle ne N/A" /NH

0

This is my code for a function that gets the tasks and gets their names, also adding them into a list to be accessed from a list. It creates temp files with the data, reads the files and gets the task name with the .exe suffix, and arranges the files to be deleted when the program has exited with System.exit(0), it also hides the processes being used to get the tasks and also java.exe so that the user can't accidentally kill the process that runs the program all together.

private static final DefaultListModel tasks = new DefaultListModel();

public static void getTasks()
{
    new Thread()
    {
        @Override
        public void run()
        {
            try 
            {
                File batchFile = File.createTempFile("batchFile", ".bat");
                File logFile = File.createTempFile("log", ".txt");
                String logFilePath = logFile.getAbsolutePath();
                try (PrintWriter fileCreator = new PrintWriter(batchFile)) 
                {
                    String[] linesToPrint = {"@echo off", "tasklist.exe >>" + logFilePath, "exit"};
                    for(String string:linesToPrint)
                    {
                        fileCreator.println(string);
                    }
                    fileCreator.close();
                }
                int task = Runtime.getRuntime().exec(batchFile.getAbsolutePath()).waitFor();
                if(task == 0)
                {
                    FileReader fileOpener = new FileReader(logFile);
                    try (BufferedReader reader = new BufferedReader(fileOpener))
                    {
                        String line;
                        while(true)
                        {
                            line = reader.readLine();
                            if(line != null)
                            {
                                if(line.endsWith("K"))
                                {
                                    if(line.contains(".exe"))
                                    {
                                        int index = line.lastIndexOf(".exe", line.length());
                                        String taskName = line.substring(0, index + 4);
                                        if(! taskName.equals("tasklist.exe") && ! taskName.equals("cmd.exe") && ! taskName.equals("java.exe"))
                                        {
                                            tasks.addElement(taskName);
                                        }
                                    }
                                }
                            }
                            else
                            {
                                reader.close();
                                break;
                            }
                        }
                    }
                }
                batchFile.deleteOnExit();
                logFile.deleteOnExit();
            } 
            catch (FileNotFoundException ex) 
            {
                Logger.getLogger(Functions.class.getName()).log(Level.SEVERE, null, ex);
            } 
            catch (IOException | InterruptedException ex) 
            {
                Logger.getLogger(Functions.class.getName()).log(Level.SEVERE, null, ex);
            }
            catch (NullPointerException ex)
            {
                // This stops errors from being thrown on an empty line
            }
        }
    }.start();
}

public static void killTask(String taskName)
{
    new Thread()
    {
        @Override
        public void run()
        {
            try 
            {
                Runtime.getRuntime().exec("taskkill.exe /IM " + taskName);
            } 
            catch (IOException ex) 
            {
                Logger.getLogger(Functions.class.getName()).log(Level.SEVERE, null, ex);
            }
        }
    }.start();
}
  • I've also made this code into a full program to try and replicate the built-in task manager for Windows 10, if anyone is interested, I can send you a demo of it. – Dylan Wedman Dec 29 '18 at 1:53

Your Answer

By clicking "Post Your Answer", you acknowledge that you have read our updated terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy, and that your continued use of the website is subject to these policies.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.