1

The following code is based on that found in Modern C++ programming cookbook, and is compiled in VS 2017:

#include <iostream>

using namespace std;

template <typename T, size_t const Size> 
class dummy_array 
{ 
    T data[Size] = {}; 

public: 
    T const & GetAt(size_t const index) const 
    { 
        if (index < Size) return data[index]; 
        throw std::out_of_range("index out of range"); 
    } 

    // I have added this
    T & GetAt(size_t const index) 
    { 
        if (index < Size) return data[index]; 
        throw std::out_of_range("index out of range"); 
    } 

    void SetAt(size_t const index, T const & value) 
    { 
        if (index < Size) data[index] = value; 
        else throw std::out_of_range("index out of range"); 
    } 

    size_t GetSize() const { return Size; } 
};

template <typename T, typename C, size_t const Size> 
class dummy_array_iterator_type 
{ 
public: 
    dummy_array_iterator_type(C& collection,  
        size_t const index) : 
        index(index), collection(collection) 
    { } 

    bool operator!= (dummy_array_iterator_type const & other) const 
    { 
        return index != other.index; 
    } 

    T const & operator* () const 
    { 
        return collection.GetAt(index); 
    }

    // I have added this
    T & operator* () 
    { 
        return collection.GetAt(index); 
    } 

    dummy_array_iterator_type const & operator++ () 
    { 
        ++index; 
        return *this; 
    } 

private: 
    size_t   index; 
    C&       collection; 
};

template <typename T, size_t const Size> 
using dummy_array_iterator =  dummy_array_iterator_type<T, dummy_array<T, Size>, Size>; 

// I have added the const in 'const dummy_array_iterator_type'
template <typename T, size_t const Size> 
using dummy_array_const_iterator =  const dummy_array_iterator_type<T, dummy_array<T, Size> const, Size>;

template <typename T, size_t const Size> 
inline dummy_array_iterator<T, Size> begin(dummy_array<T, Size>& collection) 
{ 
    return dummy_array_iterator<T, Size>(collection, 0); 
} 

template <typename T, size_t const Size> 
inline dummy_array_iterator<T, Size> end(dummy_array<T, Size>& collection) 
{ 
    return dummy_array_iterator<T, Size>(collection, collection.GetSize()); 
} 

template <typename T, size_t const Size> 
inline dummy_array_const_iterator<T, Size> begin(dummy_array<T, Size> const & collection) 
{ 
    return dummy_array_const_iterator<T, Size>(collection, 0); 
} 

template <typename T, size_t const Size> 
inline dummy_array_const_iterator<T, Size> end(dummy_array<T, Size> const & collection) 
{ 
    return dummy_array_const_iterator<T, Size>(collection, collection.GetSize()); 
}

int main(int nArgc, char** argv)
{
    dummy_array<int, 10> arr;

    for (auto&& e : arr) 
    { 
        std::cout << e << std::endl; 
        e = 100;    // PROBLEM
    } 

    const dummy_array<int, 10> arr2;

    for (auto&& e : arr2)   // ERROR HERE
    { 
        std::cout << e << std::endl; 
    } 
}

Now, the error is pointing at the line

T & operator* ()

stating

'return': cannot convert from 'const T' to 'T &'"

...which is raised from my range based for loop on arr2.

Why is the compiler choosing the none-constant version of operator*()?. I have looked at this for a long time; I think its because it thinks that the object on which it is calling this operator is not constant: this should be a dummy_array_const_iterator. But, this object has been declared to be constant via

template <typename T, size_t const Size> 
using dummy_array_const_iterator =  const dummy_array_iterator_type<T, dummy_array<T, Size> const, Size>;

...so I really don't understand what is happening. Can someone please clarify?

TIA

  • 1
    I think you should create another type of iterator, or rename the original iterator to something like const_dummy_array_iterator_type and have another non-const version of it, just like in C++ standard library does (const_iterator and iterator) – tntxtnt Feb 14 at 13:47
1
+50

dummy_array_const_iterator::operator * should always return T const & regardless of constness of the iterator object itself.

The easiest way to achieve this is probably just to declare it with T const as underlying iterator value type:

template <typename T, size_t const Size> 
using dummy_array_const_iterator = dummy_array_iterator_type<T const, dummy_array<T, Size> const, Size>;

Since you are returning the iterator by value its constness can be easily lost by c++ type deduction rules and just declaring dummy_array_const_iterator as alias to const dummy_array_iterator_type is not enough. i.e. the following fails:

#include <type_traits>

struct I { };
using C = I const;
C begin();

int bar()
{
    auto x = begin(); // type of x is deduced as I
    static_assert(std::is_same<I, decltype(x)>::value, "same"); // PASS
    static_assert(std::is_same<decltype(begin()), decltype(x)>::value, "same"); // ERROR
}
  • OK, I've tried that and it compiles. It even compiles if I change =const dummy_array_iterator_type to = dummy_array_iterator_type'. But I still don't understand: the const` form of operator*() should have been called on a const dummy_array_iterator_type but it wasn't: why? And how does this code now faciliate the const version of dummy_array_iterator_type::operator*() to be called, even when the dummy_array_iterator_type is NOT const? Can you please elaborate in your answer (where you have more space)? – Wad Feb 16 at 16:14
  • @Wad I've added an example of constness loss to the answer. Hope this clarifies the observed behavior. – dewaffled Feb 16 at 18:36
  • Thanks, I understand how auto drops the const. 1) I am thus assuming that the range for will use the auto keyword to deduce the types of the iterators, hence this problem arises; is this correct? 2) I thought that your fix would cause the 'const` form of 'operator*()' to be called, but having stepped though the code it doesn't!; it is the none-const form that is always called; I can remove the const form completely! I am now totally confused, can you possibly shed light on exactly what your fix facilitates? – Wad Feb 16 at 20:55
  • 1
    1) yeah, this behavior specified in standard - en.cppreference.com/w/cpp/language/range-for#Explanation 2) If you want the same behavior as standard library iterators then you should leave only const form (and remove remove non-const) - it will be invoked for both const and non-const objects and if you do the opposite dereferencing of const objects will not compile. – dewaffled Feb 16 at 21:42
  • Sorry, was thinking hard. Your fix, to change type underlying value type to const, works because in my code, for a constant iterator, the return type of dummy_array_iterator_type::operator*() (which is T&) becomes const T& i.e. const int&; it doesn't matter that the dummy_array_iterator_type itself is not const. Thus, an attempt to assign to an iterator of a const dummy_array will fail as we're trying to assign to const int&. When the dummy_array is not const, operator*() return an int& so we can assign to it! Please confirm this is correct? – Wad Feb 18 at 11:44
1

I found a way to enable T& operator*() only when C is not constant:

    template <class Tp = T>
    typename std::enable_if<std::is_const<C>::value, Tp>::type const& operator* () const 
    { 
        return collection.GetAt(index); 
    }

    template <class Tp = T>
    typename std::enable_if<!std::is_const<C>::value, Tp>::type & operator* () const 
    { 
        return collection.GetAt(index); 
    }

I have no idea about the syntax (which I get from https://stackoverflow.com/a/26678178)

  • 1
    Thanks; this is a good workaround. However, I am probably going to open a bounty on this because I need to understand why my code as-is does not work; please don't be offended! – Wad Feb 15 at 11:59

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.