3

I'm using Entity Framework Core to retrieve entities already stored in the database, but depending on how I do that, they are sometimes retrieved in the "Detached" state, even when I'm not using AsNoTracking at all.

These are the classes used to model the database:

class AppDbContext : DbContext
{
    public DbSet<Thing> Thing { get; set; }

    protected override void OnConfiguring(DbContextOptionsBuilder options)
    {
        options.UseSqlServer("...");
    }
}

class Thing
{
    public int ThingId { get; set; }
    public string Name { get; set; }
}

The following is a class used to reproduce the scenario where the entities are retrieved in a detached state:

class Wrapper
{
    public Thing Thing { get; set; }
    public Wrapper(Thing t)
    {
        Thing = t;
    }
}

The main program then does the following:

foreach (var wrapper in context.Thing.Select(a => new Wrapper(a)))
{
    Console.WriteLine(context.Entry(wrapper.Thing).State);
}

foreach (var thing in context.Thing.Select(a => a))
{
    Console.WriteLine(context.Entry(thing).State);
}

Assuming there are three rows in the Thing table, the output becomes the following:

Detached
Detached
Detached
Unchanged
Unchanged
Unchanged

In other words, the entities are detached if retrieved and then passed into the Wrapper constructor but tracked (in the "Unchanged" state) if simply retrieved regularly.

It is my understanding that entities already persisted to the database should always be retrieved in a tracked state unless explicitly retrieved with AsNoTracking, so what could cause this difference in behavior? And how could it be fixed to make sure the entities are always tracked?

A few notes:

  • The Wrapper class is clearly pointless here, but it's a minimal example of a more meaningful construct in my real program that causes the same behavior.
  • Flipping the order of the foreach loops (so that the one with the wrapper runs last) causes the entities to be tracked in both loops, so in that case the first loop clearly has a side effect on the second loop.
  • Extending the first foreach loop to iterate over context.Thing.ToArray().Select(a => new Wrapper(a)) (with a ToArray added) gives the expected result (tracked entities), so this seems to be related to the method of iteration - but how?
1
  • You might want to specify the EF Core version here. I seem to remember this kind of Select action wasn't allowed.
    – H H
    Feb 15, 2019 at 12:19

1 Answer 1

2

Apparently, the EF code interprets Select(a => new Wrapper(a)) the same as Select(a => new { a.Id, a.Name } ). It cannot see that a Wrapper stores a back reference.

In other words, it sees (thinks) you are immediately converting the entity so it decides not to track it.

It is specified here, but you have to understand that the new{} part is also processed by EF. And your new Wrapper(a) is not.

You could try a => new Wrapper() {Thing = a}, I'm not 100% sure about that.

... the first loop clearly has a side effect on the second loop.

Yes, as long as they are part of the same connection. The tracker won't 'forget' entities. You can read about that here.

5
  • This makes sense, but do you have any suggestions for how to get around it? Turning it into an array before the select seems to work, but that looks odd and would be easy to forget.
    – Tree
    Feb 15, 2019 at 13:35
  • No direct solution, but the Wrapper part doesn't look like it belongs in a repository (DbContext). So add an architectural layer and the problem goes away.
    – H H
    Feb 15, 2019 at 13:48
  • And on the other side, keeping things Attached for too long isn't a good idea. So maybe always use AsNoTracking? It all depends on how you use this.
    – H H
    Feb 15, 2019 at 13:49
  • I want to accept this answer, but is there any resource to refer to that describes the actual behavior when EF decides what to track? I assumed that all entities returned from a query are automatically tracked (unless AsNoTracking is no used). The example code and your answer demonstrates that they aren't, but right now it seems everything we have to back that up is experience and intuition. Could we make this more specific in one way or another?
    – Tree
    Feb 19, 2019 at 13:45
  • Fantastic! That gives me the rest of the insights that I was missing.
    – Tree
    Feb 20, 2019 at 13:30

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.