1

This one is a bit difficult to explain so let me show you what I am referring to per an example:

from statistics import mean
import numpy as np
import matplotlib.pyplot as plt
from matplotlib import style
import random


# xs = np.array([1,2,3,4,5,6], dtype=np.float64)
# ys = np.array([5,4,6,5,6,7], dtype=np.float64)

def create_dataset(hm, variance, step=2, correlation=False):
    val = 1
    ys = [] # empty list
    for i in range(hm):
        y = val + random.randrange(-variance, variance)
        ys.append(y)
        if correlation and correlation == 'pos':
        val += step
        elif correlation and correlation == 'neg':
        val -= step

    xs = [i for i in range(len(ys))]
    return np.array(xs, dtype=np.float64), np.array(ys, dtype=np.float64)

Now let's create a dataset:

xs, ys = create_dataset(30, 12, 2, correlation='pos')
print("X series: %s\n\nY series: %s" % (xs, ys))

Example output:

X series: [  0.   1.   2.   3.   4.   5.   6.   7.   8.   9.  10.  11.  12.  13.  14.
  15.  16.  17.  18.  19.  20.  21.  22.  23.  24.  25.  26.  27.  28.  29.]

Y series: [  1.  -6.  10.   9.  -1.  13.  24.  21.  14.  12.  17.  29.  23.  37.  32.
  36.  25.  27.  27.  47.  36.  32.  51.  37.  50.  47.  61.  45.  65.  59.]

Coming from a OOP background I'm a bit confused by this:

if correlation and correlation == 'pos':
   val += step

As you can see val is changed after y was already assigned. But it seems to affect y nevertheless post assignment. So this looks like as if an equation reference of sorts is held in memory and the result can be affected by changing any of its operators.

Why and how is this possible in python? In C# or Java, once you assign primitive floats or integers will not change unless you directly reference it. When you use object Floats or Integers then I think that's possible but only if another variable is assigned to the same reference. Changing inputs to a prior equation would not do that either AFAIK.

Anyway, it seems that there's something python related going on I am not familiar with.

4
  • Can you clarify what you mean by "it seems to affect y nevertheless post assignment"?
    – Cities
    Commented Feb 14, 2019 at 19:11
  • @martineau - Please run the code with and without the 'correlation' param. You'll see the y series will be affected by the val assignment. But why is that? y had already been assigned so changing val should have no impact on y. Hope that makes sense.
    – Molecool
    Commented Feb 14, 2019 at 20:15
  • Molecool: I think you should have directed your comment to @Cities...
    – martineau
    Commented Feb 14, 2019 at 20:19
  • @Cities - sorry I got confused there. Hope my response clears it up.
    – Molecool
    Commented Feb 14, 2019 at 21:15

1 Answer 1

1

The random variance makes it hard to see what's going on with val. So let's simplify the function:

In [16]: def create_dataset(hm, step=2, correlation='pos'):
    ...:     val = 1
    ...:     ys = [] # empty list
    ...:     for i in range(hm):
    ...:         y = val
    ...:         ys.append(y)
    ...:         if correlation and correlation == 'pos':
    ...:             val += step
    ...:         elif correlation and correlation == 'neg':
    ...:             val -= step
    ...:     return ys

In [17]: create_dataset(5, 2, "pos")
Out[17]: [1, 3, 5, 7, 9]
In [18]: create_dataset(5, 2, "neg")
Out[18]: [1, -1, -3, -5, -7]

That is what I expected. val incremented by step (or decremented), once per iteration. And the new value is stored in ys in the next loop.

In [19]: val = 0
In [20]: val += 12
In [21]: val
Out[21]: 12
In [22]: val *= 2
In [23]: val
Out[23]: 24

For a number like this val -= 12 is the same as:

In [24]: val = val - 12
In [25]: val
Out[25]: 12

A new number is assigned to val.

'+' and '+=' translate into method calls:

val + 12  => val.__add__(12)
val +=12  => val.__iadd__(12)

Those methods are defined for each object type, so details can vary with type.

For mutable objects like lists and numpy arrays, the difference between '+' and '+=' are more significant, and sometimes cause problems in iterations.

I believe C and/or C++ has i++ operation. This is sort of like a += 1.

1
  • OMG - I'm a complete idiot for not seeing the val reference BEFORE the loop. Went to the dentist today and I think the novocaine is still in my system - LOL :-) Thanks for the response!
    – Molecool
    Commented Feb 14, 2019 at 21:17

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